APOD: Moonset at Whitby Abbey (2016 Oct 29)

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APOD Robot
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APOD: Moonset at Whitby Abbey (2016 Oct 29)

Post by APOD Robot » Sat Oct 29, 2016 4:06 am

Image Moonset at Whitby Abbey

Explanation: October's Hunters Moon shines near the horizon, setting beyond the arches of Whitby Abbey in this eerie night scene. The moonlight partly illuminates the ruined Benedictine abbey's grounds and walls on a cliff overlooking the North Sea from England's Yorkshire coast. Fans of Bram Stoker's 1897 novel Dracula will recognize the abbey and town of Whitby as the location of the Transylvanian count's shipwrecked landing on English shores. There fiction's most famous vampire transformed into an immense dog, jumped ashore and ran up the cliff to the ruined abbey. A 360 degree panorama, the dramatic fisheye view was created from 23 digitally stitched photos.

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hamilton1
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Re: APOD: Moonset at Whitby Abbey (2016 Oct 29)

Post by hamilton1 » Sat Oct 29, 2016 12:18 pm

It has always surprised me how poor and anti-climactic the ending to Dracula actually is, as if Stoker was rushing to finish the novel before his in-laws came to visit.

Seedsof Earth

Re: APOD: Moonset at Whitby Abbey (2016 Oct 29)

Post by Seedsof Earth » Sat Oct 29, 2016 3:21 pm

This hardly qualifies as an astronomical picture; however, it did inspire me to do more research on the abbey. Quite a fascinating place.
Would love to visit there.

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Re: APOD: Moonset at Whitby Abbey (2016 Oct 29)

Post by ChrisKotsiopoulos » Sat Oct 29, 2016 5:23 pm

'Seedsof Earth' this is true. The astronomical element is not strong (although, apart from the Moon, Orion constellation is also visible for those who observe!).

Earth is also a part of Cosmos though, with many stories worth to be told every once in a while even on Astronomy Picture of the Day site.
Personally, one of my favorite APODs is this one:
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap120710.html

Thanks for watching everyone and have a nice evening from the cloudy England!

No one in paticular

Re: APOD: Moonset at Whitby Abbey (2016 Oct 29)

Post by No one in paticular » Sun Oct 30, 2016 2:27 am

Really? The APOD is just to show us that we, in planet Earth, have a moon in the sky? Not criticizing, just expecting something of value.

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geckzilla
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Re: APOD: Moonset at Whitby Abbey (2016 Oct 29)

Post by geckzilla » Sun Oct 30, 2016 3:52 am

No one in paticular wrote:Really? The APOD is just to show us that we, in planet Earth, have a moon in the sky? Not criticizing, just expecting something of value.
Putting "not criticizing" in the middle of some criticism doesn't stop it being criticism. Not criticizing, just pointing that out.
Just call me "geck" because "zilla" is like a last name.

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DavidLeodis
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Re: APOD: Moonset at Whitby Abbey (2016 Oct 29)

Post by DavidLeodis » Sun Oct 30, 2016 1:59 pm

Seedsof Earth wrote:This hardly qualifies as an astronomical picture; however, it did inspire me to do more research on the abbey. Quite a fascinating place.
Would love to visit there.
Hi Seedsof Earth. :)

Whitby is a great place to visit. Take the bus from Scarborough and see the superb views of Ravenscar and Robin Hoods Bay before reaching Whitby. Or come by the road from Pickering that goes through part of the North York Moors National Park and see the intriguing Hole of Horcum and other views, or take the excellent heritage steam train from Pickering to Whitby. If you climb the 199 steps (which I did a few weeks back) be sure to look at the many old mostly quite eroded gravestones at the old Church of Saint Mary that is at the top of the steps and so reached before the Abbey. There is cliff erosion constantly going on in the area and not that long back some bones where exposed below the church that were thought might have come from very old graves. It all adds to the interest of Whitby.

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Re: APOD: Moonset at Whitby Abbey (2016 Oct 29)

Post by ChrisKotsiopoulos » Sun Oct 30, 2016 5:36 pm

No one in paticular wrote:Really? The APOD is just to show us that we, in planet Earth, have a moon in the sky? Not criticizing, just expecting something of value.
I'm referring to the Whitby Abbey story and the Dracula myth. These are the "stories worth to be told". I never said that APOD is here to show us that we "have a moon in the sky". These are only your words. "Not criticizing" but clearly you don’t know what are you talking about and apart from being rude you also trying to mislead the others by misrepresenting my words.

Someone in particular:
Chris Kotsiopoulos.

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geckzilla
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Re: APOD: Moonset at Whitby Abbey (2016 Oct 29)

Post by geckzilla » Sun Oct 30, 2016 6:07 pm

ChrisKotsiopoulos wrote:
No one in paticular wrote:Really? The APOD is just to show us that we, in planet Earth, have a moon in the sky? Not criticizing, just expecting something of value.
I'm referring to the Whitby Abbey story and the Dracula myth. These are the "stories worth to be told". I never said that APOD is here to show us that we "have a moon in the sky". These are only your words. "Not criticizing" but clearly you don’t know what are you talking about and apart from being rude you also trying to mislead the others by misrepresenting my words.
Crhis, I think Seedsof Earth and the other guest, No one in particular, are two different individuals (I checked the IPs). I don't think the second one intended to reply to you directly.
Just call me "geck" because "zilla" is like a last name.

ChrisKotsiopoulos
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Re: APOD: Moonset at Whitby Abbey (2016 Oct 29)

Post by ChrisKotsiopoulos » Sun Oct 30, 2016 8:44 pm

Hi Geckzilla.

I have noticed that they are two different individuals.

Anyway. No worries..

I verify what DavidLeodis said. Whitby is a fantastic place and despite the 800 km driving I can't wait to get there again.

nelliesgrampa@gmail.com

Re: APOD: Moonset at Whitby Abbey (2016 Oct 29)

Post by nelliesgrampa@gmail.com » Sat Nov 05, 2016 1:53 am

Isn't Whitby the port from which Captain James Cooke sailed as he began his voyage to the South Pacific to view the Transit of Venus?

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neufer
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Re: APOD: Moonset at Whitby Abbey (2016 Oct 29)

Post by neufer » Sat Nov 05, 2016 2:30 am

nelliesgrampa@gmail.com wrote:
Isn't Whitby the port from which Captain James Cooke sailed as he began his voyage to the South Pacific to view the Transit of Venus?
  • No.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whitby wrote:
<<In his youth the explorer James Cook learned his trade on colliers, shipping coal from the port. HMS Endeavour, the ship commanded by Cook on his voyage to Australia and New Zealand, was built in Whitby in 1764 by Tomas Fishburn as a coal carrier named Earl of Pembroke. She was bought by the Royal Navy 1768, refitted and renamed.>>
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/First_voyage_of_James_Cook wrote:
<<The first voyage of James Cook was a combined Royal Navy and Royal Society expedition to the south Pacific Ocean aboard HMS Endeavour, from 1768 to 1771. The aims of this first expedition were to observe the 1769 transit of Venus across the Sun (3–4 June of that year), and to seek evidence of the postulated Terra Australis Incognita or "unknown southern land". The voyage was commissioned by King George III and commanded by Lieutenant James Cook, a junior naval officer with skills in cartography and mathematics. Cook departed from Plymouth on 26 August 1768, carrying 94 people and 18 months of provisions. The result of the observations was not as conclusive or accurate as had been hoped.>>
Art Neuendorffer