APOD: Catalog Entry Number 1 (2018 Mar 15)

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APOD Robot
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APOD: Catalog Entry Number 1 (2018 Mar 15)

Post by APOD Robot » Thu Mar 15, 2018 4:08 am

Image Catalog Entry Number 1

Explanation: Every journey has first step and every catalog a first entry. First entries in six well-known deep sky catalogs appear in these panels, from upper left to lower right in chronological order of original catalog publication. From 1774, Charles Messier's catalog entry number 1 is M1, famous cosmic crustacean and supernova remnant the Crab Nebula. J.L.E. Dreyer's (not so new) New General Catalog was published in 1888. A spiral galaxy in Pegasus, his NGC 1 is centered in the next panel. Just below it in the frame is another spiral galaxy cataloged as NGC 2. In Dreyer's follow-on Index Catalog (next panel), IC 1 is actually a faint double star, though. Now recognized as part of the Perseus molecular cloud complex, dark nebula Barnard 1 begins the bottom row from Dark Markings of the Sky, a 1919 catalog by E.E. Barnard. Abell 1 is a distant galaxy cluster in Pegasus, from George Abell's 1958 catalog of Rich Clusters of Galaxies. The final panel is centered on vdB 1, from Sidney van den Bergh's 1966 study. The pretty, blue galactic reflection nebula is found in the constellation Cassiopeia.

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starsurfer
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Re: APOD: Catalog Entry Number 1 (2018 Mar 15)

Post by starsurfer » Thu Mar 15, 2018 9:08 am

This is a fantastic idea! Every journey starts with a single step. Another good idea would be to do the last entries in these catalogues.

Here are some more number ones:

The other Abell 1 by Mike Keith

AM 1 by CHART32

CG 1 by CEDIC

DeHt 1 by Steve Crouch

DS 1 by Steve Crouch

EGB 1 by Stephane Zoll

HFG 1 by Ken Crawford

HH 1 by Capella Observatory

Longmore 1 by CHART32

Menzel 1 by CHART32

Sh2-1 by Atacama Photographic Observatory

Shapley 1 by Michael Sidonio

We 5-1 by CHART32

Westerlund 1 by Rolf Olsen


There are still lots of number ones yet to be photographed! The one I most want to see is the planetary nebula VBRC 1.

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Indigo_Sunrise
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Re: APOD: Catalog Entry Number 1 (2018 Mar 15)

Post by Indigo_Sunrise » Thu Mar 15, 2018 11:35 am

What a very nice - and varied - collection! 8-)

[and yours too, starsurfer :) ]
Forget the box, just get outside.

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Ann
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Re: APOD: Catalog Entry Number 1 (2018 Mar 15)

Post by Ann » Thu Mar 15, 2018 11:43 am

Indigo_Sunrise wrote: Thu Mar 15, 2018 11:35 am What a very nice - and varied - collection! 8-)

[and yours too, starsurfer :) ]
Agreed! :D

Ann
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saturno2
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Re: APOD: Catalog Entry Number 1 (2018 Mar 15)

Post by saturno2 » Thu Mar 15, 2018 1:00 pm

Interesting

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orin stepanek
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Re: APOD: Catalog Entry Number 1 (2018 Mar 15)

Post by orin stepanek » Thu Mar 15, 2018 1:27 pm

Imagine the date on our calendars if we could start counting years after the Earth's first trip around the Sun! Maybe something like 4,976;432,0181 :shock: :lol2: ! Notice I ended with 2018 !
Be nice! :D
Orin

Smile today; tomorrow's another day!

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Re: APOD: Catalog Entry Number 1 (2018 Mar 15)

Post by De58te » Thu Mar 15, 2018 1:58 pm

I wonder, is the IC 1 [pronounced icy one] star really so cold that it has frozen over?

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neufer
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Re: APOD: Catalog Entry Number 1 (2018 Mar 15)

Post by neufer » Thu Mar 15, 2018 3:53 pm

starsurfer wrote: Thu Mar 15, 2018 9:08 am
This is a fantastic idea!
Every journey starts with a single step.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_journey_of_a_thousand_miles_begins_with_a_single_step wrote:
<<"A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step" (Chinese: 千里之行,始於足下; literally: "A journey of a thousand li starts beneath one's feet") is a common saying that originated from a famous Chinese proverb. The quotation is from Chapter 64 of the Tao Te Ching. This saying teaches that even the longest and most difficult ventures have a starting point; something which only begins with one first step.>>
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tao_Te_Ching wrote:
<<The Tao Te Ching is a Chinese classic text traditionally credited to the 6th-century BCE sage Laozi. The text's authorship, date of composition and date of compilation are debated. The oldest excavated portion dates back to the late 4th century BCE. The Tao Te Ching, along with the Zhuangzi, is a fundamental text for both philosophical and religious Taoism.

The Tao Te Ching is ascribed to Lao Tzu ("Old Master"), whose historical existence has been a matter of scholastic debate. Legends claim variously that Laozi was "born old"; that he lived for 996 years, with twelve previous incarnations starting around the time of the Three Sovereigns before the thirteenth as Laozi. Some Western scholars have expressed doubts over Lao Tzu's historical existence, claiming that the Tao Te Ching is actually a collection of the work of various authors.>>
Art Neuendorffer

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Re: APOD: Catalog Entry Number 1 (2018 Mar 15)

Post by edgardine » Thu Mar 15, 2018 5:30 pm

Do you know the stories of these first ? I only know that M1 is because Messier had mistaken the Crabe nebula for the Halley's comet. (And that this location is close to where was Uranus when Herschel discovered it.)

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MarkBour
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Re: APOD: Catalog Entry Number 1 (2018 Mar 15)

Post by MarkBour » Thu Mar 15, 2018 7:59 pm

In the caption today, there is one reference:
APOD Robot wrote: Thu Mar 15, 2018 4:08 am ...
The pretty, blue galactic reflection nebula is found in the constellation Cassiopeia.
I'm wondering if there is significance in adding the term "galactic" here. Or was it just pointing out that this reflection nebula is within our own galaxy?
Mark Goldfain

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neufer
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Re: APOD: Catalog Entry Number 1 (2018 Mar 15)

Post by neufer » Thu Mar 15, 2018 10:10 pm

MarkBour wrote: Thu Mar 15, 2018 7:59 pm
In the caption today, there is one reference:
APOD Robot wrote: Thu Mar 15, 2018 4:08 am ...
The pretty, blue galactic reflection nebula is found in the constellation Cassiopeia.
I'm wondering if there is significance in adding the term "galactic" here.

Or was it just pointing out that this reflection nebula is within our own galaxy?
  • ...a little gaLactic acid from Mark :!:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lactic_acid wrote:
<<Lactic acid was isolated for the first time by the Swedish chemist Carl Wilhelm Scheele in 1780 from sour milk. The name reflects the lact- combining form derived from the Latin word for milk. In 1808, Jöns Jacob Berzelius discovered that lactic acid (actually L-lactate) also is produced in muscles during exertion. In 1856, Louis Pasteur discovered Lactobacillus and its role in the making of lactic acid.

Although glucose is usually assumed to be the main energy source for living tissues, there are some indications that it is lactate, and not glucose, that is preferentially metabolized by neurons in the brain of several mammalian species (the notable ones being mice, rats, and humans). According to the lactate-shuttle hypothesis, glial cells are responsible for transforming glucose into lactate, and for providing lactate to the neurons. Because of this local metabolic activity of glial cells, the extracellular fluid immediately surrounding neurons strongly differs in composition from the blood or cerebro-spinal fluid, being much richer with lactate, as was found in microdialysis studies.>>
Art Neuendorffer

starsurfer
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Re: APOD: Catalog Entry Number 1 (2018 Mar 15)

Post by starsurfer » Sun Mar 18, 2018 10:18 am

MarkBour wrote: Thu Mar 15, 2018 7:59 pm In the caption today, there is one reference:
APOD Robot wrote: Thu Mar 15, 2018 4:08 am ...
The pretty, blue galactic reflection nebula is found in the constellation Cassiopeia.
I'm wondering if there is significance in adding the term "galactic" here. Or was it just pointing out that this reflection nebula is within our own galaxy?
Galactic refers to things that are in our galaxy.

starsurfer
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Re: APOD: Catalog Entry Number 1 (2018 Mar 15)

Post by starsurfer » Thu Mar 29, 2018 9:42 am

starsurfer wrote: Thu Mar 15, 2018 9:08 am This is a fantastic idea! Every journey starts with a single step. Another good idea would be to do the last entries in these catalogues.

Here are some more number ones:

The other Abell 1 by Mike Keith

AM 1 by CHART32

CG 1 by CEDIC

DeHt 1 by Steve Crouch

DS 1 by Steve Crouch

EGB 1 by Stephane Zoll

HFG 1 by Ken Crawford

HH 1 by Capella Observatory

Longmore 1 by CHART32

Menzel 1 by CHART32

Sh2-1 by Atacama Photographic Observatory

Shapley 1 by Michael Sidonio

We 5-1 by CHART32

Westerlund 1 by Rolf Olsen


There are still lots of number ones yet to be photographed! The one I most want to see is the planetary nebula VBRC 1.
I forgot this one!

Fg 1 by Michael Sidonio