APOD: Moon and Planets at Twilight (2019 Nov 28)

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APOD: Moon and Planets at Twilight (2019 Nov 28)

Post by APOD Robot » Thu Nov 28, 2019 5:07 am

Image Moon and Planets at Twilight

Explanation: This week's ongoing conjunction of Venus and Jupiter may have whetted your appetite for skygazing. Tonight is the main course though. On November 28, a young crescent Moon will join them posing next to the two bright planets above the western horizon at twilight. Much like tonight's visual feast, this night skyscape shows a young lunar crescent and brilliant Venus in the western evening twilight on October 29. The celestial beacons are setting over distant mountains and the Minya monastery, Ganzi Tibetan Autonomous Prefecture, Sichuan, China, planet Earth. Then Mercury, not Jupiter, was a celestial companion to Venus and the Moon. The fleeting innermost planet is just visible here in the bright twilight, below and left of Venus and near the center of the frame. Tomorrow, November 29, the crescent Moon will also help you spot planet Saturn for desert.

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Ann
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Re: APOD: Moon and Planets at Twilight (2019 Nov 28)

Post by Ann » Thu Nov 28, 2019 6:38 am

APOD Robot wrote:

Tomorrow, November 29, the crescent Moon will also help you spot planet Saturn for desert.
Surely you don't mean "desert" as in, say, Sahara? Surely you mean dessert, like in a big slice of cake or an ice cream sundae? Or as a last, satisfying observation of your sky watching session by capturing a glimpse of the majestic ringed planet?

Ann
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Re: APOD: Moon and Planets at Twilight (2019 Nov 28)

Post by Boomer12k » Thu Nov 28, 2019 7:31 am

Interesting image...and great trio of objects... ummm... what is the bright object just above the clouds to the left of Venus then???

We are socked in...rather wet now...

Save some sand for me....er.... PIE... I mean...
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just deserts

Post by neufer » Thu Nov 28, 2019 12:20 pm

Ann wrote:
Thu Nov 28, 2019 6:38 am
APOD Robot wrote:
Tomorrow, November 29, the crescent Moon will also help you spot planet Saturn for desert.
Surely you don't mean "desert" as in, say, Sahara?
Surely you mean dessert, like in a big slice of cake or an ice cream sundae?
  • It may all depend on how "whetted your appetite" is.
https://www.etymonline.com/search?q=desert wrote:
desert (n.2) c. 1300, "fact of deserving a certain treatment (for good or ill) for one's behavior," from Old French deserte "merit, recompense," noun use of past participle of deservir "be worthy to have," ultimately from Latin deservire "serve well," from de- "completely" (see de-) + servire "to serve". Meaning "suitable reward or punishment, what one deserves" (now usually plural and with just), is from late 14c.
......................................................
dessert (n.) "a service of fruits and sweets at the close of a meal," c. 1600, from Middle French dessert (mid-16c.) "last course," literally "removal of what has been served," from desservir "clear the table," literally "un-serve," from des- "remove, undo" + Old French servir "to serve".
......................................................
desert (n.1) "wasteland, wilderness, barren area," wooded or not, c. 1200, from Old French desert (12c.) "desert, wilderness, wasteland; destruction, ruin" and directly from Late Latin desertum (source of Italian diserto, Old Provençal dezert, Spanish desierto), literally "thing abandoned" (used in Vulgate to translate "wilderness"), noun use of neuter past participle of Latin deserere "forsake".
Last edited by neufer on Fri Nov 29, 2019 12:30 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Ann
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Re: APOD: Moon and Planets at Twilight (2019 Nov 28)

Post by Ann » Thu Nov 28, 2019 12:37 pm

neufer wrote:
Thu Nov 28, 2019 12:20 pm
Ann wrote:
Thu Nov 28, 2019 6:38 am
APOD Robot wrote:
Tomorrow, November 29, the crescent Moon will also help you spot planet Saturn for desert.
Surely you don't mean "desert" as in, say, Sahara?
Surely you mean dessert, like in a big slice of cake or an ice cream sundae?
  • It may all depend on how "whetted your appetite" is.

To each his or her own.

Click to play embedded YouTube video.
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Re: APOD: Moon and Planets at Twilight (2019 Nov 28)

Post by orin stepanek » Thu Nov 28, 2019 1:15 pm

Ann wrote:
Thu Nov 28, 2019 12:37 pm
neufer wrote:
Thu Nov 28, 2019 12:20 pm
Ann wrote:
Thu Nov 28, 2019 6:38 am


Surely you don't mean "desert" as in, say, Sahara?
Surely you mean dessert, like in a big slice of cake or an ice cream sundae?
  • It may all depend on how "whetted your appetite" is.

To each his or her own.

Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Maybe she couldn't get a sandwich!
Orin

Smile today; tomorrow's another day!

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Re: APOD: Moon and Planets at Twilight (2019 Nov 28)

Post by orin stepanek » Thu Nov 28, 2019 1:27 pm

For me Mercury was pretty hard to find! :roll:
2019_10_29_Village_Moon_Venus_Mercury_1024px.png

So I Blew it up! (the photo that is!) :wink:
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Orin

Smile today; tomorrow's another day!

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Re: APOD: Moon and Planets at Twilight (2019 Nov 28)

Post by Ann » Thu Nov 28, 2019 2:03 pm

orin stepanek wrote:
Thu Nov 28, 2019 1:15 pm
Ann wrote:
Thu Nov 28, 2019 12:37 pm
neufer wrote:
Thu Nov 28, 2019 12:20 pm
  • It may all depend on how "whetted your appetite" is.

To each his or her own.

Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Maybe she couldn't get a sandwich!


A sandwich, that's it! (So what's the "wich" of the sandwich?)

Ann
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Re: APOD: Moon and Planets at Twilight (2019 Nov 28)

Post by Chris Peterson » Thu Nov 28, 2019 2:07 pm

Boomer12k wrote:
Thu Nov 28, 2019 7:31 am
Interesting image...and great trio of objects... ummm... what is the bright object just above the clouds to the left of Venus then???
Jupiter.
Chris

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orin stepanek
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Re: APOD: Moon and Planets at Twilight (2019 Nov 28)

Post by orin stepanek » Thu Nov 28, 2019 2:12 pm

Click to play embedded YouTube video.
[/quote]

Maybe she couldn't get a sandwich!

[/quote]



A sandwich, that's it! (So what's the "wich" of the sandwich?)

Ann
[/quote]

Ann; did she want a sandwich? I don't think she was a Sandwitch; but I don't really know! :mrgreen: Hmmm; which was it?
Orin

Smile today; tomorrow's another day!

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Ann
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Re: APOD: Moon and Planets at Twilight (2019 Nov 28)

Post by Ann » Thu Nov 28, 2019 2:33 pm

orin stepanek wrote:
Thu Nov 28, 2019 2:12 pm
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Maybe she couldn't get a sandwich!

[/quote]



A sandwich, that's it! (So what's the "wich" of the sandwich?)

Ann
[/quote]

Ann; did she want a sandwich? I don't think she was a Sandwitch; but I don't really know! :mrgreen: Hmmm; which was it?
[/quote]

I'll ask her next time I see her! :D

Ann
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Re: APOD: Moon and Planets at Twilight (2019 Nov 28)

Post by heehaw » Thu Nov 28, 2019 5:06 pm

You can never starve in the Sahara Desert ... because: you can always eat ... the sand-which-is there.

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Re: APOD: Moon and Planets at Twilight (2019 Nov 28)

Post by alter-ego » Thu Nov 28, 2019 5:56 pm

Chris Peterson wrote:
Thu Nov 28, 2019 2:07 pm
Boomer12k wrote:
Thu Nov 28, 2019 7:31 am
Interesting image...and great trio of objects... ummm... what is the bright object just above the clouds to the left of Venus then???
Jupiter.
Actually it is δ Sco, mag 2.4. Jupiter is about 17° out of the field of view to the upper left.
A pessimist is nothing more than an experienced optimist

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Re: APOD: Moon and Planets at Twilight (2019 Nov 28)

Post by Chris Peterson » Thu Nov 28, 2019 6:10 pm

alter-ego wrote:
Thu Nov 28, 2019 5:56 pm
Chris Peterson wrote:
Thu Nov 28, 2019 2:07 pm
Boomer12k wrote:
Thu Nov 28, 2019 7:31 am
Interesting image...and great trio of objects... ummm... what is the bright object just above the clouds to the left of Venus then???
Jupiter.
Actually it is δ Sco, mag 2.4. Jupiter is about 17° out of the field of view to the upper left.
I agree. That looks about right.
Chris

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Re: APOD: Moon and Planets at Twilight (2019 Nov 28)

Post by Boomer12k » Fri Nov 29, 2019 2:54 am

Chris Peterson wrote:
Thu Nov 28, 2019 6:10 pm
alter-ego wrote:
Thu Nov 28, 2019 5:56 pm
Chris Peterson wrote:
Thu Nov 28, 2019 2:07 pm


Jupiter.
Actually it is δ Sco, mag 2.4. Jupiter is about 17° out of the field of view to the upper left.
I agree. That looks about right.
Thanks to the both of you... Happy TG.
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Just deserts: Dschubba Gump shrimp

Post by neufer » Fri Nov 29, 2019 12:50 pm

Click to play embedded YouTube video.
APOD Robot wrote:
Tomorrow, November 29, the crescent Moon will also help you spot planet Saturn for desert.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delta_Scorpii wrote:
<<Dschubba (δ Scorpii A) is a Gamma Cassiopeiae variable star. This type of star shows irregular slow brightness variations of a few hundredths of a magnitude due to a disc of material spun off by the rapidly rotating star.

In 1981 Dschubba (δ Sco) was occulted by Saturn's rings as seen by Voyager 2, with starlight unexpectedly blocked even by the apparently empty gaps, indicating that "there is very little empty space anywhere in the main ring system.">>
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