APOD: Moon Setting Behind Teide Volcano (2020 Mar 22)

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APOD: Moon Setting Behind Teide Volcano (2020 Mar 22)

Post by APOD Robot » Sun Mar 22, 2020 4:05 am

Image Moon Setting Behind Teide Volcano

Explanation: These people are not in danger. What is coming down from the left is just the Moon, far in the distance. Luna appears so large here because she is being photographed through a telescopic lens. What is moving is mostly the Earth, whose spin causes the Moon to slowly disappear behind Mount Teide, a volcano in the Canary Islands off the northwest coast of Africa. The people pictured are 16 kilometers away and many are facing the camera because they are watching the Sun rise behind the photographer. It is not a coincidence that a full moon rises just when the Sun sets because the Sun is always on the opposite side of the sky from a full moon. The featured video was made two years ago during the full Milk Moon. The video is not time-lapse -- this was really how fast the Moon was setting.

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jks
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Re: APOD: Moon Setting Behind Teide Volcano (2020 Mar 22)

Post by jks » Sun Mar 22, 2020 4:29 am

deja vu?

APOD 2018 June 4

Edit: If so, I did not mean to sound harsh or critical. The video is spectacular, and it is worth another view!
Last edited by jks on Sun Mar 22, 2020 4:57 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: APOD: Moon Setting Behind Teide Volcano (2020 Mar 22)

Post by SpaceCadet » Sun Mar 22, 2020 4:55 am

Can someone please explain the giant Luna through a telescopic lend part? Did the people there see an ordinary sized moon? And does the lens type affect the apparent speed also?

heehaw

Re: APOD: Moon Setting Behind Teide Volcano (2020 Mar 22)

Post by heehaw » Sun Mar 22, 2020 9:30 am

It was almost impossible for Galileo to convince the world that that motion is (mostly) motion of the Earth, NOT motion of the Moon at all...

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Re: APOD: Moon Setting Behind Teide Volcano (2020 Mar 22)

Post by orin stepanek » Sun Mar 22, 2020 11:01 am

jks wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 4:29 am
deja vu?

APOD 2018 June 4

Edit: If so, I did not mean to sound harsh or critical. The video is spectacular, and it is worth another view!
Sunday APOD's usually are repeats; a day off is nice for everyone! :D
Orin

Smile today; tomorrow's another day!

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Re: APOD: Moon Setting Behind Teide Volcano (2020 Mar 22)

Post by neufer » Sun Mar 22, 2020 12:42 pm

Click to play embedded YouTube video.
SpaceCadet wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 4:55 am

Can someone please explain the giant Luna through a telescopic lend part?
Did the people there see an ordinary sized moon?
The Moon IS BIG compared to the size of people.

People only look larger than the Moon when they are very close to you.

A telescope can magnify both the Moon and the people equally
(and keep distant people in focus at the same time) but
it can't change their relative sizes as determined by perspective.
Art Neuendorffer

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Re: APOD: Moon Setting Behind Teide Volcano (2020 Mar 22)

Post by neufer » Sun Mar 22, 2020 12:50 pm

heehaw wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 9:30 am

It was almost impossible for Galileo to convince the world that that motion is (mostly) motion of the Earth, NOT motion of the Moon at all...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Earth%27s_rotation#History wrote:
<<Among the ancient Greeks, several of the Pythagorean school believed in the rotation of Earth rather than the apparent diurnal rotation of the heavens. Perhaps the first was Philolaus (470–385 BCE), though his system was complicated, including a counter-earth rotating daily about a central fire. A more conventional picture was that supported by Hicetas, Heraclides and Ecphantus in the fourth century BCE who assumed that Earth rotated but did not suggest that Earth revolved about the Sun. In the third century BCE, Aristarchus of Samos suggested the Sun's central place. However, Aristotle in the fourth century BCE criticized the ideas of Philolaus as being based on theory rather than observation. He established the idea of a sphere of fixed stars that rotated about Earth. This was accepted by most of those who came after, in particular Claudius Ptolemy (2nd century CE), who thought Earth would be devastated by gales if it rotated.

In 499 CE, the Indian astronomer Aryabhata wrote that the spherical Earth rotates about its axis daily, and that the apparent movement of the stars is a relative motion caused by the rotation of Earth. He provided the following analogy: "Just as a man in a boat going in one direction sees the stationary things on the bank as moving in the opposite direction, in the same way to a man at Lanka the fixed stars appear to be going westward."

In the 10th century, some Muslim astronomers accepted that Earth rotates around its axis. According to al-Biruni, Abu Sa'id al-Sijzi (d. circa 1020) invented an astrolabe called al-zūraqī based on the idea believed by some of his contemporaries "that the motion we see is due to the Earth's movement and not to that of the sky." The prevalence of this view is further confirmed by a reference from the 13th century which states: "According to the geometers [or engineers] (muhandisīn), the Earth is in constant circular motion, and what appears to be the motion of the heavens is actually due to the motion of the Earth and not the stars." Treatises were written to discuss its possibility, either as refutations or expressing doubts about Ptolemy's arguments against it. At the Maragha and Samarkand observatories, Earth's rotation was discussed by Tusi (b. 1201) and Qushji (b. 1403); the arguments and evidence they used resemble those used by Copernicus.

In medieval Europe, Thomas Aquinas accepted Aristotle's view and so, reluctantly, did John Buridan and Nicole Oresme in the fourteenth century. Not until Nicolaus Copernicus in 1543 adopted a heliocentric world system did the contemporary understanding of Earth's rotation begin to be established. Copernicus pointed out that if the movement of Earth is violent, then the movement of the stars must be very much more so. He acknowledged the contribution of the Pythagoreans and pointed to examples of relative motion. For Copernicus this was the first step in establishing the simpler pattern of planets circling a central Sun.

Tycho Brahe, who produced accurate observations on which Kepler based his laws, used Copernicus's work as the basis of a system assuming a stationary Earth. In 1600, William Gilbert strongly supported Earth's rotation in his treatise on Earth's magnetism and thereby influenced many of his contemporaries. Those like Gilbert who did not openly support or reject the motion of Earth about the Sun are often called "semi-Copernicans". A century after Copernicus, Riccioli disputed the model of a rotating Earth due to the lack of then-observable eastward deflections in falling bodies; such deflections would later be called the Coriolis effect. However, the contributions of Kepler, Galileo and Newton gathered support for the theory of the rotation of Earth.>>
Art Neuendorffer

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Re: APOD: Moon Setting Behind Teide Volcano (2020 Mar 22)

Post by Chris Peterson » Sun Mar 22, 2020 1:52 pm

SpaceCadet wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 4:55 am
Can someone please explain the giant Luna through a telescopic lend part? Did the people there see an ordinary sized moon? And does the lens type affect the apparent speed also?
It has nothing to do with the lens, and only the relative distance between the observer, intermediate objects, and the Moon. At arm's length, the Moon is the size of your thumbnail. Across the street, it's the size of your neighbor's chimney. A few blocks away and it's the size of a house. A few miles away, it's the size of a mountain.

For you, the Moon is always the same angular size, about 0.5°. You make a picture like today's by having the people far enough away that they subtend a much smaller angle than that.
Chris

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Re: APOD: Moon Setting Behind Teide Volcano (2020 Mar 22)

Post by pferkul » Sun Mar 22, 2020 2:02 pm

Here's a version with a bit more lively music: the conclusion to Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata. Enjoy!
Click to play embedded YouTube video.

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Re: APOD: Moon Setting Behind Teide Volcano (2020 Mar 22)

Post by aildoux » Sun Mar 22, 2020 2:28 pm

I see smoke rising up. I presume it's from the volcano and not campfires.
I feel the Earth rising up, like an elevator.

NCTom

Re: APOD: Moon Setting Behind Teide Volcano (2020 Mar 22)

Post by NCTom » Sun Mar 22, 2020 2:46 pm

I am as fascinated by this APOD now as when I saw its first posting. Fabulous repeat!

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Re: APOD: Moon Setting Behind Teide Volcano (2020 Mar 22)

Post by jks » Sun Mar 22, 2020 7:12 pm

orin stepanek wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 11:01 am
jks wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 4:29 am
deja vu?

APOD 2018 June 4

Edit: If so, I did not mean to sound harsh or critical. The video is spectacular, and it is worth another view!
Sunday APOD's usually are repeats; a day off is nice for everyone! :D
Thank you. Good grief, I should have figured that out by now. :lol2:

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Re: APOD: Moon Setting Behind Teide Volcano (2020 Mar 22)

Post by TheZuke! » Tue Mar 24, 2020 1:18 pm

Chris Peterson wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 1:52 pm
SpaceCadet wrote:
Sun Mar 22, 2020 4:55 am
Can someone please explain the giant Luna through a telescopic lend part? Did the people there see an ordinary sized moon? And does the lens type affect the apparent speed also?
It has nothing to do with the lens, and only the relative distance between the observer, intermediate objects, and the Moon. At arm's length, the Moon is the size of your thumbnail. Across the street, it's the size of your neighbor's chimney. A few blocks away and it's the size of a house. A few miles away, it's the size of a mountain.

For you, the Moon is always the same angular size, about 0.5°. You make a picture like today's by having the people far enough away that they subtend a much smaller angle than that.
What a good explanation!
Thanks!