Found Images: 2022 June

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Found Images: 2022 June

Post by bystander » Wed Jun 01, 2022 3:24 am


Have you seen a great image or video somewhere that you think would make a great APOD? Nominate it for APOD! Please post as much information here as you have about the image/video with a link to any source(s) for it you know of here, and the editors will take a look.

When posting the image itself, please do not post anything larger than a thumbnail here; please honor the copyright holder's copyright.

Please keep hotlinked images under 500K.

Thank you!

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starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2022 June

Post by starsurfer » Thu Jun 02, 2022 10:48 pm

StDr Object 20
https://www.astrobin.com/950d0s/
Copyright: Marcel Drechsler/Xavier Strottner/Chilescope
iAc5XfVcHNH9_2560x0_n1wMX-gx.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 June

Post by starsurfer » Thu Jun 02, 2022 10:57 pm

NGC 6164-5
http://www.cielaustral.com/galerie/photo134.htm
Copyright: Ciel Austral
Photo134fb.jpg
Photo134.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 June

Post by starsurfer » Fri Jun 03, 2022 10:22 pm

CTB 1
http://www.astronomersdoitinthedark.com ... =146&p=585
Copyright: Scott Rosen
CTB1.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 June

Post by starsurfer » Sat Jun 04, 2022 10:22 pm

MWP 1 and Alv 1
http://www.capella-observatory.com/Imag ... ndALV1.htm
Copyright: Josef Pöpsel, Stefan Binnewies and Frank Sackenheim
MWP1.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 June

Post by starsurfer » Sat Jun 04, 2022 10:25 pm

IC 405 and IC 410
http://www.astrosurf.com/ilizaso/orriak ... Q_U16m.htm
Copyright: Iñaki Lizaso
IC405-IC410.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 June

Post by Ann » Sun Jun 05, 2022 8:54 am

IC 5063
https://www.flickr.com/photos/geckzilla/51407497279/
Contribution: NASA / ESA / Aaron Barth / Julianne Dalcanton / DECaM Legacy Survey / Judy Schmidt
Copyright: Judy Schmidt



This amazing portrait of galaxy IC 5063 reminds me of the fantastic spaceship from Close Encounters of the Third Kind.

Judy Schmidt (Geckzilla) wrote:

The Crepuscular Rays of IC 5063

Revisiting our old friend IC 5063, this time with a bit of color, clearly revealing the emission line features emerging nearly perpendicular from the crepuscular rays. These features, in cyan, are most easily viewed zoomed in on the nucleus. They are thought to be formed by the actively accreting supermassive black hole in the center of the galaxy. In this case, the black hole may have a dark "donut" of dust around its equatorial axis, and the extremely bright light creates ionizing cones and jets of material out of the polar axis.

The processing here is not only extreme, but also a combination of data from two separate HST snapshot proposals, and the wondrous Legacy Survey DR9 release. I used my hacky Photoshop subtraction model to clearly reveal the center of the galaxy in the Hubble data, while the outer parts are partially filled using the LS DR9 imagery, more smoothly and confidently illustrating the galaxy's outer tidal structures.

Hubble image coverage is incomplete; some sections contain only one filter/color.

Read what ESA/Hubble wrote about this galaxy here.

Ann
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Re: Found Images: 2022 June

Post by ExplorerEGYWO » Mon Jun 06, 2022 7:09 am

Image
https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/521 ... a955_o.jpg
Bode Galaxy - Cigar Galaxy - NGC 2976 & IFN group by Wael Omar, on Flickr

M81, also known as Bode's galaxy, is a large bright spiral galaxy located 11.8 million light-years away in the constellation of Ursa Major. It’s a grand design galaxy of diameter 90000 light years with active nucleus that has supermassive Black hole ( 70 million solar mass). It’s also reported that M81 may be the source of FRB 20200120E, a repeating fast radio burst. You can find it in the middle right of my image.

Next to its lower left is the M82 , also known “Cigar Galaxy”, it’s a star burst galaxy that undergo high rate of star formation which is triggered by interaction with the neighboring Bode’s galaxy. Tidal forces caused by gravity have deformed M82, a process that started about 100 million years ago. This interaction has caused star formation to increase tenfold compared to "normal" galaxies. The red spark in the middle of M81 represent the light from the glowing hydrogen filaments.

On the upper right you can see very small spot , its NGC 2976 , a peculiar dwarf galaxy .the galaxy's outer regions stopped making stars because the gas ran out. Now, the inner disk is almost out of gas as new stars burst to life, shrinking the star-formation region to a small area of about 5,000 light-years around the core. The very small blue dots in the galaxy are fledgling blue giant stars residing in the remaining active star-birth regions.

All over the image there is reddish brown interstellar dust known as IFN “Integrated flux nebula “. These nebula clouds are illuminated by energy from the integrated flux of all the stars , They are composed of dust particles, hydrogen and carbon monoxide and other elements.


Gears and Acquisition Data:

The image is represented in HaLRGB , Total Exposure = 7 hrs and 10 minutes taken at Bortle 5 and Bortle 2 areas.

I use zwo 294 mm pro with Red Cat 51, the FOV is too wide for these galaxies but I tried my best to reveal their details as I could.

I created different crops to have different views of the objects included in my imaging session.
Image
https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/521 ... a8c3_o.jpg
Bode's Galaxy - Cigar Galaxy by Wael Omar, on Flickr

Image
https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/521 ... bf7c_o.jpg
Bode's-Cigar Galaxies by Wael Omar, on Flickr


Image Credit: Wael Omar WO/ https://www.instagram.com/waelomar_astrophotography/

Location: Qatamyah & Fayoum / EGYPT.
Last edited by bystander on Mon Jun 06, 2022 12:21 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Please, no hot links to images > 500 kb. Substituted smaller images.

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ESO: A Curled Viper (NGC 1087)

Post by bystander » Mon Jun 06, 2022 1:07 pm

A Curled Viper
ESO Picture of the Week | 2022 Jun 06
Resembling a curled sleeping snake, this picture shows NGC 1087. This spiral galaxy, located approximately 80 million light-years from Earth in the constellation of Cetus, is captured here by a combination of observations conducted at different wavelengths –– or colours –– of light.

But no need to worry, NGC 1087 will not poison you! The apparent menacing red glow actually corresponds to clouds of cold molecular gas, the raw material out of which stars form. Astronomers are able to image these clouds thanks to the Chile-based Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), in which ESO is a partner. The bluish regions in the background reveal the pattern of older, already formed stars, imaged by the Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) on ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) also in Chile.

The images were taken as part of the Physics at High Angular resolution in Nearby GalaxieS (PHANGS) project. The team is making high-resolution observations of nearby galaxies with telescopes operating across a wide range of wavelengths. Different wavelengths tell us about the physical properties of stars, gas and dust within galaxies, and by comparing them astronomers are able to study what activates, boosts or hinders the birth of new stars.
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ESA: Hubble Investigates an Enigmatic Globular Cluster

Post by bystander » Mon Jun 06, 2022 1:16 pm

Hubble Investigates an Enigmatic Globular Cluster
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2022 Jun 06
potw2223a[1].jpg
Image Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, A. Dotter
Like Sherlock Holmes’s magnifying glass writ large, the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope has been used to peer into an astronomical mystery in search of clues. The enigma in question concerns the globular cluster Ruprecht 106, which is pictured in this image. While the constituent stars of globular clusters all formed at approximately the same location and time, it turns out that almost all globular clusters contain groups of stars with distinct chemical compositions. These distinct chemical fingerprints are left by groups of stars with very slightly different ages or compositions from the rest of the cluster. A tiny handful of globular clusters do not possess these multiple populations of stars, and Ruprecht 106 is a member of this enigmatic group.

Hubble captured this star-studded image using one of its most versatile instruments; the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). Much like the stars in globular clusters, Hubble’s instruments also have distinct generations: ACS is a third generation instrument which replaced the original Faint Object Camera (FOC) in 2002. Some of Hubble’s other instruments have also gone through three iterations: the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) replaced the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2) during the final servicing mission to Hubble. WFPC2 itself replaced the original Wide Field and Planetary Camera (WFPC1), which was installed on Hubble at launch.

Astronauts on the NASA Space Shuttle serviced Hubble in orbit a total of five times, and were able to either upgrade aging equipment or replace instruments with newer, more capable versions. This high-tech tinkering in low Earth orbit has helped keep Hubble at the cutting edge of astronomy for more than 3 decades.
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Re: Found Images: 2022 June

Post by starsurfer » Mon Jun 06, 2022 10:30 pm

Abell 78
https://www.hansonastronomy.com/abell-78
Copyright: Mark Hanson
Abell-78.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 June

Post by starsurfer » Mon Jun 06, 2022 10:32 pm

PM 1-333
https://www.imagingdeepspace.com/pm1-333.html
Copyright: Peter Goodhew
w2KQU7rYdG0N_16536x0_b9muqi8S.jpg
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NOIRLab: Starry Night, Laser Light (Gemini South)

Post by bystander » Wed Jun 08, 2022 7:58 pm

Starry Night, Laser Light
NOIRLab Image of the Week | 2022 Jun 08
Gemini South, one half of the International Gemini Observatory, a Program of NSF’s NOIRLab, is seen here with its laser guide star in action. Both of the Gemini telescopes use laser guide stars to provide data for the calibration of their adaptive optics, systems of deformable mirrors that compensate for fluctuations in the upper atmosphere which can blur the images of distant stars and galaxies. The laser excites trace gas particles high in Earth’s upper atmosphere. Software then analyzes feedback from the laser to provide a model for the adaptive optics to map against. The laser guide stars can also be augmented by additional adaptive optics systems that use images of real stars from the telescope itself, such as the Natural Guide Star Next Generation Sensor (NGS-2).
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Re: Found Images: 2022 June

Post by starsurfer » Wed Jun 08, 2022 10:12 pm

We 3-1
https://www.astrobin.com/vnje4o/
Copyright: Boris Chausov
wfQUHfFRT8xu_2560x0_n1wMX-gx.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 June

Post by starsurfer » Wed Jun 08, 2022 10:14 pm

Abell 34
https://www.starscapeimaging.com/Abell34/Abell34.html
Copyright: Jon Talbot
Abell34.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 June

Post by starsurfer » Wed Jun 08, 2022 10:18 pm

NGC 3195
https://www.adamblockphotos.com/ngc-3195.html
Copyright: Adam Block/Telescope Live
n3195.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 June

Post by starsurfer » Sun Jun 12, 2022 10:39 pm

M98
https://esahubble.org/images/potw1925a/
Copyright: ESA/Hubble & NASA, V. Rubin et al.

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Re: Found Images: 2022 June

Post by starsurfer » Sun Jun 12, 2022 10:50 pm

NGC 3576 and NGC 3603
http://www.atacama-photographic-observa ... .php?id=38
Copyright: Thierry Demange, Richard Galli and Thomas Petit
ngc3576.jpg
http://www.atacama-photographic-observa ... .php?id=42
ngc3576_SHO.jpg
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ESO: Twin Telescopes Share a Sunset in Paranal

Post by bystander » Mon Jun 13, 2022 3:34 pm

Twin Telescopes Share a Sunset in Paranal
ESO Picture of the Week | 2022 Jun 13
This Picture of the Week shows a soothing sunset over ESO’s Paranal Observatory, home to the Very Large Telescope (VLT). The watercolour skies create a magnificent backdrop for two Auxiliary Telescopes (ATs). The VLT has four of these, and they work together as part of a larger observing facility known as the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI).

The VLTI combines the cosmic light collected by up to four telescopes, either the ATs or their four larger counterparts, the 8.2 m Unit Telescopes (UTs). A system of mirrors housed within underground tunnels channel the different light beams towards the VLTI lab, where they are combined using a technique called interferometry. This allows researchers to probe the universe with much sharper eyes, with a huge “virtual” telescope as large as the separation between the individual telescopes, currently up to about 140 m, which can spot details that each telescope would individually miss.

The VLTI recently celebrated its 20th birthday With its extraordinarily high resolution, it is able to see fine details such as stellar surfaces, and even to study the stars orbiting the black hole at the centre of our galaxy.
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ESA: Cosmic Treasure Chest (Terzan 9)

Post by bystander » Mon Jun 13, 2022 3:46 pm

Cosmic Treasure Chest
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2022 Jun 13
potw2224a[1].jpg
Image Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, R. Cohen
This star-studded image shows the globular cluster Terzan 9 in the constellation Sagittarius, towards the centre of the Milky Way. The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope captured this glittering scene using its Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS).

Globular clusters are stable, tightly bound groupings of tens of thousands to millions of stars. As this image demonstrates, the hearts of globular clusters can be densely packed with stars; the night sky in this image is strewn with so many stars that it resembles a sea of sequins or a vast treasure chest crammed with gold.

This starry snapshot is from a Hubble programme investigating globular clusters located towards the heart of the Milky Way. The central region of our home galaxy contains a tightly packed group of stars known as the Galactic bulge, which is also rich in interstellar dust. This dust has made globular clusters near the Galactic centre difficult to study, as it absorbs starlight and can even change the apparent colours of the stars in these clusters. Hubble's sensitivity at both visible and infrared wavelengths has allowed astronomers to measure how the colours of these globular clusters have been changed by interstellar dust, and thereby to establish their ages.
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Re: Found Images: 2022 June

Post by starsurfer » Mon Jun 13, 2022 10:06 pm

Helix Galaxy (NGC 2685)
https://www.astrobin.com/486jrg/0/
Copyright: Tim Gillespie
f9p_s_LwXsOs_2560x0_wmyInb3A.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 June

Post by starsurfer » Mon Jun 13, 2022 10:08 pm

NGC 6752
https://www.astrobin.com/6poqfr/
Copyright: Rod Kennedy
SJeaooczjFZH_2560x0_n1wMX-gx.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 June

Post by starsurfer » Mon Jun 13, 2022 10:11 pm

vdB152 region
https://www.astrobin.com/5ezmna/
Copyright: Jan Schubert
mKIFAZy05i6O_2560x0_5pyJjyjk.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 June

Post by starsurfer » Mon Jun 13, 2022 10:13 pm

PuWe 1
https://www.astrobin.com/s9140b/C/
Copyright: Stefan Thrun
jM8wmX-X8YMf_2560x0_jaUALzhf.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 June

Post by starsurfer » Mon Jun 13, 2022 10:16 pm

IC 417 and NGC 1931
https://www.astrobin.com/rnw191/
Copyright: Mathieu Guinot
fWm2yuHClfCT_2560x0_7m_0LUcz.jpg
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