Submissions: 2022 August

See new, spectacular, or mysterious sky images.
Mathieu80

Re: Submissions: 2022 August

Post by Mathieu80 » Mon Aug 15, 2022 10:03 am

ImageMosaique NGC7000 IC5067 IC5068 by Mathieu Guinot, sur Flickr

I took this 2nd picture with my new wide field setup during holidays, and enjoyed very much to give to this wonderful and famous Cygnus area a try.
It is a 2 frames mosaic which maybe i hope to complete later by including Sh2-119 with a 3x2 panels mosaïc.

Takahashi FS60CB Feathertouch
Camera ZWO ASI 2600mm & filters ANTLIA SHO 3.5nm
Guiding OAG M68 ZWO + camera ASI 290mm mini
Mounts Ioptron CEM70 & CEM25p

Acquisitions From 07/14/22 to 08/08/22

NGC7000 & IC5067 panel :
S : 56x300s
H : 92x300s
O : 65x300s

IC5068 panel :
S : 52x300s
H : 104x300s
O : 88x300s

RichStevenson
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Re: Submissions: 2022 August

Post by RichStevenson » Mon Aug 15, 2022 12:06 pm

Mineral Moon version of the Sturgeon Moon taken on 8/12/22.
100 images at 1/800, ISO 100, stacked and processed in Ps.

https://telescopius.com/pictures/view/124709

markh@tds.net
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Re: Submissions: 2022 August

Post by markh@tds.net » Mon Aug 15, 2022 3:46 pm

NGC 1808- In Columba (this is a Reprocessed Version showing outer arms and some very nice deep detail.
© Selby-Hanson
NGC 1808 LRGB rev APOD cropsmallCDK 1000 10 August 2022.jpg
NGC 1808 is a barred spiral galaxy of some 35,000 light-years across, located about 40 million light-years away in the southern constellation Columba. NGC 1808 is undergoing so much star formation it has been deemed a starburst galaxy. The galaxy is moving away from us at 995 kilometers per second.

NGC 1808 is distinguished by a peculiar and complex nucleus, an unusually warped disk, and strange flows of hydrogen gas out from the central regions. The galaxy’s center is the hotbed of vigorous star formation.

The starburst must be at least 50 million years old and can be no older than 100 million years old. Star formation has been rapid and continuous. Without an influx of fresh molecular gas into the central region, the star forming activity can only be maintained at this rate for another 6 to 20 million years.

NGC 1808 is called a barred spiral galaxy because of the straight lines of star formation on both sides of the bright nucleus. This star formation may have been triggered by the rotation of the bar, or by matter which is streaming along the bar towards the nuclear region (feeding the starburst). Filaments of dust are being ejected from the core into the galactic halo by massive stars that have exploded as supernovae in the starburst region.

Taken from Chile with 1-meter Planewave CDK telescope by Mike Selby. Re Processed by us.

Enjoy,

Mike & Mark
http://hansonastronomy.com
http://throughlightandtime.com
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the_astronomy_enthusiast
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Re: Submissions: 2022 August

Post by the_astronomy_enthusiast » Mon Aug 15, 2022 3:48 pm

Image
Hubble's infrared view of the Horsehead Nebula by William Ostling, on Flickr

Full write-up here: https://theastroenthusiast.com/hubbles- ... ad-nebula/
Looking like an apparition rising from whitecaps of interstellar foam, the iconic Horsehead Nebula has graced astronomy books ever since its discovery over a century ago. The nebula is a favorite target for amateur and professional astronomers.

In this new Hubble Space Telescope view, the nebula appears in a new light, as seen in infrared wavelengths. The nebula, shadowy in optical light, appears transparent and ethereal when seen in the infrared, represented here with visible shades. The rich tapestry of the Horsehead Nebula pops out against the backdrop of Milky Way stars and distant galaxies that are easily seen in infrared light.

The Horsehead was photographed in celebration of the 23rd anniversary of the launch of Hubble aboard the space shuttle Discovery. Over its two decades of producing ground-breaking science, Hubble has benefited from a slew of upgrades, including the 2009 addition of a new imaging workhorse: the high-resolution Wide Field Camera 3 that was used to take this portrait of the Horsehead.

The backlit wisps along the Horsehead’s upper ridge are being illuminated by Sigma Orionis, a young five-star system just off the top of the Hubble image. A harsh ultraviolet glare from one of these bright stars is slowly evaporating the nebula. Along the nebula’s top ridge, two fledgling stars peek out from their now-exposed nurseries.

Gas clouds surrounding the Horsehead have already dissipated, but the tip of the jutting pillar contains a slightly higher density of hydrogen and helium, laced with dust. This casts a shadow that protects material behind it from being photo-evaporated, and a pillar structure forms. Astronomers estimate that the Horsehead formation has about five million years left before it too disintegrates.

Website: https://theastroenthusiast.com/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/the_astronomy_enthusiast/

themis85_GR
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Location: Greece

Re: Submissions: 2022 August

Post by themis85_GR » Mon Aug 15, 2022 3:58 pm

VDB152 LRGB Collaboration work from 2 astrophotographers

The work is collaboration from the latest annual astronomer meeting in Drimonas mountain Greece.
Lum data is from me Themis Karteris
RGB data oneshot Kallias Ioannidis
Lum data equipment
SW esprit ed100
QHY 268M
SW EQ6-R PRO
Baader Lum filter
RGB data equipment
Astro-tech 65mm EDQ
ZWO 2600MC
EQ6 Pro

ImageVDB152 LRGB Collaboration work by Efthymios Karteris, on Flickr

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Sergio
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Location: Buenos Aires, Argentina

Re: Submissions: 2022 August

Post by Sergio » Mon Aug 15, 2022 10:51 pm

NGC 3496 in Carina

NGC 3496 is located almost 3 degrees east from Carina Nebula. This open cluster is embedded with nebulosity which is part of the enormous nebula region known as RCW 54 ich is whionized by stars of the Car OB2 association. RCW 54 complex is at 3100 parsecs while NGC 3496 is at 990 parsecs
This cluster has same similarities to the well known open cluster NGC 3532. Although the last one is relative bright and bigger, it has the same RCW cloud crossing by in its background.

NGC 3496 presents a fairly compact structure grouped in 11 to 15 magnitude stars. It is a relative young open cluster with a estimated age between 400 to 600 Million years.

The image was taken from Buenos Aires suburbs.
Haven't seen many colour images of NGC 3496 taken by non professionals telescopes...

More information at

http://www.baskies.com.ar/PHOTOS/NGC%20 ... LHARGB.htm

Best Regards
Sergio
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Kinch
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Re: Submissions: 2022 August

Post by Kinch » Tue Aug 16, 2022 2:11 am

SNR G082.2+05.3
A combination of my previous HOO & SHO images to better bring out the very faint OIII bubble.
Final SNR G082.2+05.2 Sign.jpg
Click on above to enlarge.

Full info & higher resolution images @ https://www.kinchastro.com/snr-g0822053.html
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YSTY
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Re: Submissions: 2022 August

Post by YSTY » Tue Aug 16, 2022 11:48 am

Taking pictures of nebulae in another galaxy

Image

By shooting with a narrowband filter we can isolate the Hydrogen Alpha signal from an image.

The Andrometa galaxy is our neighbor and it is very bright, so the Ha signal is often lost in the galaxy.

With the use of this filter having a bandwidth of 3nm, the Ha stands out particularly well.

We can see appear full of small nebulae of a galaxy other than ours.

This image appears in black and white because it was shot with a monochrome camera which, coupled with a narrowband filter, makes it possible to isolate the signal.

By shooting with a narrowband filter we can isolate the Hydrogen Alpha signal from an image.

The Andromeda galaxy is our neighbor and it is very bright, so the Ha signal is often lost in the galaxy.

With the use of this filter having a bandwidth of 3nm, the Ha stands out particularly well.

We can see appear full of small nebulae of a galaxy other than ours.

This image appears in black and white because it was shot with a monochrome camera which, coupled with a narrowband filter, makes it possible to isolate the signal.

Taken in France between 08/05/2022 and 08/14/2022 in Lorraine (France)
Copyright : Yann SAINTYAstrobin : https://www.astrobin.com/users/Ysty/
FlickR : https://flic.kr/ps/3WUVwh

a.carrozzi
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Re: Submissions: 2022 August

Post by a.carrozzi » Tue Aug 16, 2022 5:14 pm

The Bubble Nebula, also known as NGC 7635, is an emission nebula visible in the constellation Cassiopeia and located about 11,000 light-years from us. It is a cloud of interstellar gas stretching about 10 light-years excited by a huge central star, 45 times more massive than our Sun and which has shaped them to form the characteristic bubble that gives the nebula its name.
Technical data: SkyWatcher 200mm f/5 Newton with Atik 4000 LE on SkyWatcher NEQ 6 Pro. 7x420s L, 7x420s Ha, 3x420s for RGB channels.

ImageThe Bubble Nebula - NGC 7635 by Alessandro Carrozzi, su Flickr

mftoet
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Re: Submissions: 2022 August

Post by mftoet » Tue Aug 16, 2022 10:10 pm

NGC6992, Eatern Veil Nebula in bi-color
https://www.mauricetoet.nl/DeepSky/i-cGtRtsL/A
Copyright: Maurice Toet

Tommy L.
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Re: Submissions: 2022 August

Post by Tommy L. » Wed Aug 17, 2022 2:52 pm

Title: NGC 7000 aka North America Nebula

Image Credit: Tommy Lease aka colorado_astro on Instagram

Tech details:
Gear: Nikon D5600 modified, Antlia ALPT 5nm dual-band filter, Orion 6" f/4 Newt, Skywatcher EQ35 mount.
Image details: 97x180s, 20 dark frames, 5 hrs total integration
Acquired with NINA, Sharpcap and PHD2. Processed with Pixinsight and Photoshop.
NA Nikon ALPT copy.jpg
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fxcuvelier
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Re: Submissions: 2022 August

Post by fxcuvelier » Wed Aug 17, 2022 3:57 pm

This picture has been taken on august, the 6th, 2022.
Location : Lands of Cojoux, France
This location is 5000 years old, the only difference is light pollution !
We are in front of a megalitic alignment called « Demoiselles de Cojoux ».
This picture is taken from a timelapse.

Nikon D610 + Lens Irix 15 mm f/2.4
15 sec @ ISO 1600 – f/2.4

Image
Perseids over megaliths by fx-cuvelier on flickr
Last edited by bystander on Wed Aug 17, 2022 4:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: all <img> tags require image urls not page urls

astrosama
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Re: Submissions: 2022 August

Post by astrosama » Wed Aug 17, 2022 4:28 pm

Panorama of the Milky way Arch over the Sand dunes of the Egyptian western Desert near El-Fayoum with the beginning of Perseid meteor shower

ImagePersied Meteor-shower- over sand dunes 2022 by osama Fathi, on Flickr

Date : 3 nights (5-6-7 August 2022)

We captured more than 1200 photos to get this number of the meteors near the desert of elFayoum.

Gears:
Nikon z6 Mod, Skywacher staradventurer tracker , Nikkor 14-24 mm lens , Panorama Head


Settings :
Milky way Stacked tracked Pano : 6 columns *4rows, 36 photos , 120 sec at Iso 800@ 24mm f2.8
foreground : 2photos (one row) , 1/4 sec Iso 250@ 14 mm at the blue hour

Softwares: Adobe Photoshop 2022, Pixinsight , Astrotools, Topaz Denoise


Credits: Osama Fat'hi

https://www.instagram.com/osama.fathi.nswatcher85/

Fayoum, Egypt

Kinch
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Re: Submissions: 2022 August

Post by Kinch » Wed Aug 17, 2022 7:18 pm

The Wizard Nebula
Wizard Nebula.jpg
Click on above to enlarge.

Full info & higher resolution @ https://www.kinchastro.com/ngc-7380-wizard-2022.html
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MarT
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Re: Submissions: 2022 August

Post by MarT » Wed Aug 17, 2022 7:32 pm

The sunspot AR3078

While testing our relatively new Baader Tri-Band 9,25" with the RG32 Ha filter, I had an idea to take a few hours of data together with my colleague. This is a test stack made from 1000 images from 3500 taken. We started taking the images on 16th August 2022 at 11:34 UT. It is made from around three minutes of data. The camera used was a ZWO ASI 294MC together with a SolarSpectrum 0,4x reducer and a TeleVue 2x Barlow.
There is even some granulation noticeable.

Location: Observatory and planetarium in Hradec Kralove, Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic
Credits: HPHK\ Marek Tušl \ Martin Cholasta
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Efrain Morales
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AKA: Jaicoa
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Jupiter - GRS, Moons Ganymede, IO

Post by Efrain Morales » Wed Aug 17, 2022 7:50 pm

Jupiter - GRS and the moons transiting Ganymede (L) casting its elongated shadow and Io (R) with albedo features on August 16th.
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gpassera
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Re: Submissions: 2022 August

Post by gpassera » Thu Aug 18, 2022 7:13 pm

Gulf of Mexico
Optic: SW ED 120 with TSFLAT2 Flattener
Guide: Altair Astro 60mm and StarlightXpress Lodestar
Mount: 10Micron GM2000 HPS II
Exposure Time: Ha 44 X 1200, OIII 16 X 1200, SII 16 X 1200
Camera: Moravian G2 8300 Mark II
Acquisition: CCD autopilot 5
Calibration: Pixinsight 1.8
Processing: Pixinsight 1.8 , Photoshop 2021. Topaz De Noise Ai, DXO Nik collection
Date: Aug 2022

Image

https://www.giuseppepassera.com/page-2/ ... ge-119.png
Last edited by bystander on Thu Aug 18, 2022 8:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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mathewbrowne
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Re: Submissions: 2022 August

Post by mathewbrowne » Thu Aug 18, 2022 8:57 pm

Image

Disney's Art of Animation Resort, United States © Mathew Browne via PhotoHound

At dawn on August 4th, an Atlas 5 rocket blasted off from Kennedy Space Center.
I'd never seen a rocket launch, nor photographed one, and wasn't entirely sure what I'd see from my viewpoint 60 miles west overlooking Hourglass Lake. You can only imagine my delight when a bright light emerged from the treeline seconds after launch, arcing back towards the horizon a few minutes later.
After it rose, it's contrail started to cast an unusual shadow going *up* into the sky - sunrise had not yet happened for us at ground level.

MarcAfterDark
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Re: Submissions: 2022 August

Post by MarcAfterDark » Thu Aug 18, 2022 9:24 pm

Animated transit of Io and Ganymede shadows across Jupiter over about 4 hours of real time
Connecticut, USA on August 16 2022, 03:21 to 07:12 UTC
10" Meade LX200 ACF (de-forked) on a Celestron CGX
ZWO ASI224MC with ZWO ADC & 2x TeleVue Powermate

47 Subframes, each from 2 minute video captures at about 200fps taken at 5 minute intervals
Stacked in AutoStakkert, wavelets in Registax, color correction, alignment, and gif generated in Photoshop 2022.

The transits started with Jupiter in the muck at about 20 degrees, but seeing conditions improved dramatically as it rose to almost 50 degrees by the time Ganymede's shadow exited the disc.

Link to full resolution: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1j_UOxz ... Yy8dNZoF6D

Click for animation if it doesn't play in the preview:
Jupiter-Transit-Sequence_small_wm.gif
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sydney
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Re: Submissions: 2022 August

Post by sydney » Fri Aug 19, 2022 2:59 am

O Canada (North America) Nebula

This is the Canada region of the North America Nebula (NGC 7000). I was unable to find information or designations for the prominent “L” and “C” structures. The image is an Ha/OIII bi-color mapped as red (Ha), green (80% OIII, 20% Ha), and blue (90% OIII, 10% Ha). I collected RGB data for the stars, but in this case, I prefer the starless version (removed with Starnet ++).

I hope you like it!

Nick Pavelchak
https://www.astrobin.com/eyaace/
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Ann
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Re: Submissions: 2022 August

Post by Ann » Fri Aug 19, 2022 7:14 am

sydney wrote: Fri Aug 19, 2022 2:59 am O Canada (North America) Nebula

This is the Canada region of the North America Nebula (NGC 7000). I was unable to find information or designations for the prominent “L” and “C” structures. The image is an Ha/OIII bi-color mapped as red (Ha), green (80% OIII, 20% Ha), and blue (90% OIII, 10% Ha). I collected RGB data for the stars, but in this case, I prefer the starless version (removed with Starnet ++).

I hope you like it!

Nick Pavelchak
https://www.astrobin.com/eyaace/

That's a fine image! :D

Your image made me curious about what is causing the "C" and the "L", so I decided to check images of NGC 7000 with stars. If you go to this image, you can see how the "C" stands out (at top center). The "L", to the lower right of the "C", is a lot less visible. Nevertheless, there is a blue star pretty much centered between these two regions of high ionization, and that star is HD 199579, an O6.5V star. A star of this spectral class will emit huge amounts of ultraviolet photons and also a strong stellar wind, and this is what has sculpted the "C" and the "L".

By the way, the parallax given for HD 199579 puts it at a distance of some 2,800 light-years, so this would be the distance to the North America Nebula. At least it would be the distance to the "O Canada" part of it, and the "C" and the "L"! :D

Ann
Last edited by Ann on Sat Aug 20, 2022 3:42 am, edited 1 time in total.
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cdavmd
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Re: Submissions: 2022 August

Post by cdavmd » Fri Aug 19, 2022 10:48 am

A crescent...a bubble...and a shell in the void
Copyright: Carlos David

tommasostella
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Re: Submissions: 2022 August

Post by tommasostella » Fri Aug 19, 2022 11:17 am

The Blue Horsehead
url: https://www.facebook.com/tommaso.m.stella
Copyright: Tommaso Stella
From: Taranto (Italy)

The shots were taken in 4 nights in Stigliano (MT) under an average SQM sky 21 / 21.1
12 total hours of integration and 1000km traveled

Lights: 142x300s
Telescope: Takahashi FS-60CB + Reducer 0,72x
Camera: Omegon veTEC 571C
Filters: Optolong L-Pro
Mount: Skywatcher AZ-EQ6 GT
Processing: DeepSkyStacker, PixInsight, Photoshop CC
IC4592-TommasoStellaWEB.jpg
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avdhoeven
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Re: Submissions: 2022 August

Post by avdhoeven » Fri Aug 19, 2022 9:28 pm

This 90 megapixel image is the result of a cooperation with 3 fellow astrophotographers, Sara Wager, Dominique Dierick and Kees Scherer and myself. It all started in 2017 when we worked together on a larger mosaic of part of the Cygnus constellation.

The zoomable result of this cooperation can be seen here: https://zoomhub.net/al3me

I would recommend to strawl through the image to find all the details. For example the Soap Bubble Nebula, the Cygnus X1 shockwave, Crescent and Tulip Nebula are nicely visible.

Last year (2021) I wanted to make a nice image of the Tulip Nebula (SH2-101) and the nearby hydrogen clouds so I made an image stack consisting of 1 panel of this region. This summer (2022) they predicted a longer period of clear skies and I decided to extend the field of view to get more coverage of this very interesting region.

After finishing this image I noticed that I was very nearby the Crescent nebula region and knew I had a lot of data of that region also, so I decided to look onto my image archive to see which data there was more region and that was how I stumbled onto the mosaic data again that we all captured in 2017. It showed that with this data a very nice field of view could be generated with full coverage from the Tulip up to far above the Crescent nebula. Because of the high quality of the data processing was very easy and that is what resulted in an 90 megapixel image of 4,5x6,2 degrees of sky area.
On my webpage you can find a lot more info and details about the image: https://www.astro-photo.nl/deepsky/nebu ... o-crescent

Exposures:
Dominique Dierick: 36x300s Crescent (3h)
Sara Wager: 50x1800s Crescent (25h)
Kees Scherer: 38x900s Overall field (9,5h)
André van der Hoeven: 211x900s Detailed regions (52,75h)
Total: 90,25h

Equipment:
Dominique: Takahashi FSQ106/QHY163M
Sara: Orion Optics ODK10/TMB152/QSI683wsg
Kees: Skywatcher Esprit 100D/QHY16200
André: TMB92/QSI583ws
Tulip_to_Crescent_2022_small_20p.jpg
https://www.astrobin.com/full/odqsqz/0/
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sydney
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Re: Submissions: 2022 August

Post by sydney » Fri Aug 19, 2022 10:40 pm

That's a fine image! :D

Your image made me curious about what is causing the "C" and the "L", so I decided to check images of NGC 7000 with stars. If you go to this image, you can see how the "C" stands out (at top center). The "L", to the lower right of the "C", is a lot less visible. Nevertheless, there is a blue star pretty much centered between these two regions of high ionization, and that star is HD 199579, an O6.5V star. A star of this spectral class will emit huge amounts of ultraviolet photons and also a strong stellar wind, and this is what has sculpted the "C" and the "L".

By the way, the parallax given for HD 199579 puts it at a distance of some 2,800 light-years, to this would be the distance to the North America Nebula. At least it would be the distance to the "O Canada" part of it, and the "C" and the "L"! :D

Ann

Hi Ann,

Thank you for taking the time to provide a clear explanation for me! Here is my version with stars, including HD 199579!
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