APOD: Perijove 11: Passing Jupiter (2022 Aug 28)

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APOD: Perijove 11: Passing Jupiter (2022 Aug 28)

Post by APOD Robot » Sun Aug 28, 2022 4:05 am

Image Perijove 11: Passing Jupiter

Explanation: Here comes Jupiter! NASA's robotic spacecraft Juno is continuing on its highly-elongated orbits around our Solar System's largest planet. The featured video is from perijove 11 in early 2018, the eleventh time Juno has passed near Jupiter since it arrived in mid-2016. This time-lapse, color-enhanced movie covers about four hours and morphs between 36 JunoCam images. The video begins with Jupiter rising as Juno approaches from the north. As Juno reaches its closest view -- from about 3,500 kilometers over Jupiter's cloud tops -- the spacecraft captures the great planet in tremendous detail. Juno passes light zones and dark belt of clouds that circle the planet, as well as numerous swirling circular storms, many of which are larger than hurricanes on Earth. After the perijove, Jupiter recedes into the distance, then displaying the unusual clouds that appear over Jupiter's south. To get desired science data, Juno swoops so close to Jupiter that its instruments are exposed to very high levels of radiation.

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Re: APOD: Perijove 11: Passing Jupiter (2022 Aug 28)

Post by Ann » Sun Aug 28, 2022 4:55 am

Jupiter is so beautiful! And in today's video, much of it is so blue!

I root for Jupiter being blue. And at the same time, I strongly doubt that it is blue. I mean, why would it be blue? Consider Uranus and Neptune, which are bluish because methane absorbs certain red and infrared wavelengths in their atmospheres. But nothing like that has ever been said about Jupiter. Why would parts of it be blue?

Well, actually a few small parts of it are blue, namely the hot spots!

A hot spot on Jupiter NASA SwRI MSSS Gerald Eichstädt Seán Doran.png
A blue hotspot on Jupiter. NASA/ SwRI/ MSSS/ Gerald Eichstädt/Seán Doran

I read somewhere (and don't ask me where) that all of Jupiter's atmosphere is really orange. The white parts are frost, comparable to snow. The blue hot spots are cloud free, and they look blue for the same reason that the Earth's sky is blue, due to Rayleigh scattering of sunlight! Actually even the blue hot spots are a little red, because some reddish atmospheric particles are found in the hot spots, too!

Whatever. Jupiter is beautiful!

Ann
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Re: APOD: Perijove 11: Passing Jupiter (2022 Aug 28)

Post by VictorBorun » Sun Aug 28, 2022 5:56 am

Ann wrote: Sun Aug 28, 2022 4:55 am The blue hot spots are cloud free, and they look blue for the same reason that the Earth's sky is blue, due to Rayleigh scattering of sunlight!
A team once tried to strip atmospheric blue from Earth:
Earth 13143_2021_257_Fig3.jpg
Image

However I don't think we know enough about Jupiter to do the same trick
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Re: APOD: Perijove 11: Passing Jupiter (2022 Aug 28)

Post by orin stepanek » Sun Aug 28, 2022 12:32 pm

An oldie; but a goodie! :lol2:
Orin

Smile today; tomorrow's another day!

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Re: APOD: Perijove 11: Passing Jupiter (2022 Aug 28)

Post by AVAO » Sun Aug 28, 2022 1:12 pm

Ann wrote: Sun Aug 28, 2022 4:55 am
Jupiter is so beautiful! And in today's video, much of it is so blue!
...
Ann

I like your Idea of the blue planet Jupiter... 0.34 sec
(Jupiter and Earth in size comparison)

Image


...let's settle the green valleys... 0.26 sec

Image


... and drink the water from the ice plume of the Jupiter ice volcanoes :-) ... 0.45 sec

Image
jac berne (flickr)
Last edited by AVAO on Mon Aug 29, 2022 5:33 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: APOD: Perijove 11: Passing Jupiter (2022 Aug 28)

Post by heehaw » Sun Aug 28, 2022 9:33 pm

There are quintillions of Jupiters in OUR galaxy, and there are quintillions of galaxies. Is our Universe deadly dull?

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Re: APOD: Perijove 11: Passing Jupiter (2022 Aug 28)

Post by MarkBour » Sun Aug 28, 2022 10:30 pm

For a long time, I have thought -- if Jupiter's surface is really clouds, then those cloud formations ought to swirl, and waft.

They certainly have the appearance of swirls, but always we only see what looks like a still snapshot, so we cannot see the wispy, undulating motion.

One problem is that the features we can see on grand Jupiter are so huge, that it would take a while to see them changing, in this manner that I think all clouds do. We aren't looking at puffs of merely 10-100 km in radius, rotating. The vortices we see on Jupiter are thousands of km in size. And even at good soft-cloud changing speed, it would take days or maybe even weeks for much change to happen.

So, how about a time-lapse? Here are a few images of Earth's clouds one day.
I can see the changes in the images. Even better, at the YouTube video animated from about 70 of them per day.

Capture124.png
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Another problem with Jupiter -- the planet itself rotates so rapidly that a cloud will go out of view a number of times before you can see much change. It forces us to see a strobed set of snapshots. Still, has anyone made a time-lapse that captured the great red spot in the same position for a good long sequence of rotations? If so, I think we could see the whirling dance of the clouds.

But it's not so easy to do. You couldn't get it easily from Earth, since our own motion is making consistent views difficult to amass. And an orbiter such as Juno is not in the position to keep a good record of this. But I suppose, if I looked at all of the photographic data from Juno, with a little work, it perhaps could be done.

I don't suppose anyone is planning to launch a satellite into a "junostationary" orbit (like Himawari-8 is to Earth, producing the images above). Or one at a Lagrange point for Jupiter (like DSCOVR for Earth), which is another convenient place to capture this.
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Re: APOD: Perijove 11: Passing Jupiter (2022 Aug 28)

Post by Chris Peterson » Mon Aug 29, 2022 12:41 am

MarkBour wrote: Sun Aug 28, 2022 10:30 pm For a long time, I have thought -- if Jupiter's surface is really clouds, then those cloud formations ought to swirl, and waft.

They certainly have the appearance of swirls, but always we only see what looks like a still snapshot, so we cannot see the wispy, undulating motion.

One problem is that the features we can see on grand Jupiter are so huge, that it would take a while to see them changing, in this manner that I think all clouds do. We aren't looking at puffs of merely 10-100 km in radius, rotating. The vortices we see on Jupiter are thousands of km in size. And even at good soft-cloud changing speed, it would take days or maybe even weeks for much change to happen.

So, how about a time-lapse? Here are a few images of Earth's clouds one day.
I can see the changes in the images. Even better, at the YouTube video animated from about 70 of them per day.

Capture124.png
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Another problem with Jupiter -- the planet itself rotates so rapidly that a cloud will go out of view a number of times before you can see much change. It forces us to see a strobed set of snapshots. Still, has anyone made a time-lapse that captured the great red spot in the same position for a good long sequence of rotations? If so, I think we could see the whirling dance of the clouds.

But it's not so easy to do. You couldn't get it easily from Earth, since our own motion is making consistent views difficult to amass. And an orbiter such as Juno is not in the position to keep a good record of this. But I suppose, if I looked at all of the photographic data from Juno, with a little work, it perhaps could be done.

I don't suppose anyone is planning to launch a satellite into a "junostationary" orbit (like Himawari-8 is to Earth, producing the images above). Or one at a Lagrange point for Jupiter (like DSCOVR for Earth), which is another convenient place to capture this.
Google is your friend. There are a number of time lapse videos out there which show cloud motion in the bands and in the Red Spot. Videos made with data from probes as well as from ground based telescopes.
Chris

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Re: APOD: Perijove 11: Passing Jupiter (2022 Aug 28)

Post by AVAO » Mon Aug 29, 2022 5:28 am

MarkBour wrote: Sun Aug 28, 2022 10:30 pm I don't suppose anyone is planning to launch a satellite into a "junostationary" orbit (like Himawari-8 is to Earth, producing the images above). Or one at a Lagrange point for Jupiter (like DSCOVR for Earth), which is another convenient place to capture this.

I like this animation: Voyager 1 fly by
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... educed.gif

The Great Red Spot is a vortex between two rotating segments of a circle.
Astonishing, as can be seen in the animation, the upper segment of the circle rotates in opposite directions.

See also the APOD discussion viewtopic.php?t=42145
Last edited by bystander on Mon Aug 29, 2022 2:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: APOD: Perijove 11: Passing Jupiter (2022 Aug 28)

Post by johnnydeep » Mon Aug 29, 2022 3:08 pm

heehaw wrote: Sun Aug 28, 2022 9:33 pm There are quintillions of Jupiters in OUR galaxy, and there are quintillions of galaxies. Is our Universe deadly dull?
I'm afraid you're off by at least 6 orders of magnitude. Our galaxy contains an estimated 200-400 billion stars, ranging in size from red dwarfs to super giants. Even if every one of those star systems held 10 Jupiter-like planets (which is infinitesimally unlikely to say the least), it would still "only" amount to 4 trillion Jupiters in the Milky Way. You need a factor of a million more to get to 4 quintillion. :-)

As for your query: deadliness and dullness are the eye(s) of the beholder!
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Re: APOD: Perijove 11: Passing Jupiter (2022 Aug 28)

Post by MarkBour » Tue Aug 30, 2022 7:39 am

Chris Peterson wrote: Mon Aug 29, 2022 12:41 am ...
Google is your friend. There are a number of time lapse videos out there which show cloud motion in the bands and in the Red Spot. Videos made with data from probes as well as from ground based telescopes.
Well, I swear that the last time I tried googling it, I did not find any time lapses that were at all like this. But thanks for your suggestion, there were several good ones that came up today. I especially liked this one:
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
AVAO wrote: Mon Aug 29, 2022 5:28 am ...
I like this animation: Voyager 1 fly by
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... educed.gif

The Great Red Spot is a vortex between two rotating segments of a circle.
Astonishing, as can be seen in the animation, the upper segment of the circle rotates in opposite directions.

See also the APOD discussion viewtopic.php?t=42145
Ah, yes, thanks for that one! I have watched it for quite a while now, and will watch it some more. Mesmerizing to see the motions. The dynamics are amazing.
Thank you both!
Mark Goldfain