Found Images: 2022 September

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starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2022 September

Post by starsurfer » Mon Sep 19, 2022 10:28 pm

Pinwheel Galaxy (M101)
https://www.flickr.com/photos/166915583 ... 207695357/
Copyright: Frederic Vandewattyne
48207695357_18786f2e03.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 September

Post by starsurfer » Mon Sep 19, 2022 10:31 pm

Omega Centauri (NGC 5139)
https://www.flickr.com/photos/97807083@N00/49840361466/
Copyright: Terry Robison
49840361466_8d0f4c0926.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 September

Post by starsurfer » Mon Sep 19, 2022 10:33 pm

Gem Cluster (NGC 3293)
https://www.astrobin.com/ac7n6p/B/
Copyright: Ariel Cappelletti
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Re: Found Images: 2022 September

Post by starsurfer » Mon Sep 19, 2022 10:37 pm

Trifid Nebula (M20)
https://www.astrobin.com/z9rvz7/0/
Copyright: Casey Good and Steve Timmons
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ESO: A Revolutionary Muse (MUSE, VLT)

Post by bystander » Tue Sep 20, 2022 7:13 pm

A Revolutionary Muse
ESO Picture of the Week | 2022 Sep 19
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
ESO: Documentary ‘MUSE, The Cosmic Time Machine’
Is this tangle of cords and hoses a machine from the movie The Matrix? You can stay calm: even though the sign says “danger”, what may look like a threatening machine is actually the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) instrument on ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) at Paranal Observatory. MUSE is one of the largest instruments at the VLT and is connected to one of its four 8.2 m telescopes, Yepun.

The power of MUSE is that it can take thousands of images at many different colours in one go or, in other words, to take lots of spectra within a large portion of the sky at once. This means that astronomers can observe a galaxy and get the spectral information about all regions of that galaxy. From the spectra, astronomers can determine, for instance, the chemical composition of the galaxy, key in understanding how elements such as the ones that make up us came to be.

MUSE is highly sophisticated: it comprises 24 spectrographs working together, and it took over nine years to construct, assemble and test it. One can thus truly say that MUSE is a one of its kind and a revolutionary instrument.
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ESA: An Enigmatic Astronomical Explosion (IRAS 05506+2414)

Post by bystander » Tue Sep 20, 2022 7:25 pm

An Enigmatic Astronomical Explosion
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2022 Sep 19
A bright young star is surrounded by a shroud of thick gas and dust in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) inspected a young stellar object, over 9000 light years away in the constellation Taurus, to help astronomers understand the earliest stages in the lives of massive stars. This object — which is known to astronomers as IRAS 05506+2414 — is thought to be an example of an explosive event caused by the disruption of a massive young star system. If so, it would only be the second such example known.

Usually the swirling discs of material surrounding a young star are funnelled into twin outflows of gas and dust from the star. In the case of IRAS 05506+2414, however, a fan-like spray of material travelling at velocities of up to 350 kilometres per second is spreading outwards from the centre of this image.

Astronomers turned to Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 to measure the distance to IRAS 05506+2414. While it is possible to measure the velocity of material speeding outwards from the star, astronomers cannot tell how far from Earth the star actually is from a single observation. However, by measuring the distance that the outflow travels between successive images, they will be able to infer the distance to IRAS 05506+2414. This will allow astronomers to determine how bright the star is and how much energy it is emitting, and hence to estimate its mass — all vital information that will help to understand the origin of this bright young star’s unusual outflow.
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Re: Found Images: 2022 September

Post by barretosmed » Tue Sep 20, 2022 11:03 pm

NATURE AND THE MILKY WAY

BEST DETAILS
https://www.astrobin.com/full/ygqaps/0/

EQUIPMENT:
Canon 6D
Canon lens 24-105 f4
Panel with 2 frames of 30"

LOCATION: Munhoz - MG - Brazil
DATE: 01/07/2022

Author: Fernando Oliveira de Menezes
(Organizing author of the book Astrofotografia Amadora no Brasil - BOOK - with printed version and ebook)
https://clubedeautores.com.br/livro/ast ... -no-brasil
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Re: Found Images: 2022 September

Post by jimfish » Sat Sep 24, 2022 12:08 pm

HOOClassicBinned_ps1024[1].jpg
https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap220113.html
Supernova Remnant Simeis 147
Image Credit & Copyright: Jason Dain
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ESO: Asteroid Didymos before the DART Impact

Post by bystander » Mon Sep 26, 2022 2:03 pm

Asteroid Didymos before the DART Impact
ESO Picture of the Week | 2022 Sep 26
The arrow in this Picture of the Week marks the asteroid Didymos as seen on the night of September 25/26 with ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile. Didymos has a smaller 160-metre-long moon called Dimorphos (not seen here), and on 26 September at 23:14 UTC a NASA probe is set to crash into this moon as part of the Double Asteroid Redirection Test (DART). Our VLT, like many other telescopes around the world, will be watching.

The purpose of the mission is to see if a future potentially dangerous asteroid could be deflected from its trajectory using this method. The material following the crash will also hopefully provide us with more information about the composition of asteroids – the original building blocks of our planet.

At ESO’s Paranal Observatory in Chile, all four 8.2-metre telescopes of the VLT will observe the aftermath of the impact with different instruments. The resulting data will allow astronomers to study the composition and motion of the ejected material, the structure of the asteroid’s surface and its internal properties.

The results of this experiment may provide a method of protecting our planet from hazardous asteroids but will also deepen our understanding of asteroids and hence the formation of our Solar System. To learn more about the important scientific data that will be obtained by the VLT, read our latest blog post.
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ESA: Hubble Spies a Stately Spiral Galaxy (NGC 5495)

Post by bystander » Mon Sep 26, 2022 2:16 pm

Hubble Spies a Stately Spiral Galaxy
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2022 Sep 26
The stately sweeping spiral arms of the spiral galaxy NGC 5495 are revealed by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) in this image. NGC 5495, which lies around 300 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Hydra, is a Seyfert galaxy, a type of galaxy with a particularly bright central region. These luminous cores — known to astronomers as active galactic nuclei — are dominated by the light emitted by dust and gas falling into a supermassive black hole.

This image is drawn from a series of observations captured by astronomers studying supermassive black holes lurking in the hearts of other galaxies. Studying the central regions of galaxies can be challenging: as well as the light created by matter falling into supermassive black holes, areas of star formation and the light from existing stars all contribute to the brightness of galactic cores. Hubble’s crystal-clear vision helped astronomers disentangle the various sources of light at the core of NGC 5495, allowing them to precisely weigh its supermassive black hole.

As well as NGC 5495, two stellar interlopers are visible in this image. One is just outside the centre of NGC 5495, and the other is very prominent alongside the galaxy. While they share the same location on the sky, these objects are much closer to home than NGC 5495: they are stars from our own Milky Way. The bright stars are surrounded by criss-cross diffraction spikes, optical artefacts created by the internal structure of Hubble interacting with starlight.
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Re: Found Images: 2022 September

Post by starsurfer » Wed Sep 28, 2022 9:35 am

Sagittarius B1
https://www.eso.org/public/images/potw2235a/
Copyright: ESO/Nogueras-Lara et al

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Re: Found Images: 2022 September

Post by starsurfer » Wed Sep 28, 2022 9:39 am

Southern Pleiades (IC 2602)
http://www.astrostudio.at/1_Deep%20Sky% ... 9_2602.jpg
Copyright: Geralrd Rhemann
IC2602.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 September

Post by bystander » Wed Sep 28, 2022 4:40 pm

starsurfer wrote: Wed Sep 28, 2022 9:35 am Sagittarius B1
https://www.eso.org/public/images/potw2235a/
Copyright: ESO/Nogueras-Lara et al
viewtopic.php?t=42557&p=325460#p325460
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Ann
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Re: ESA: Hubble Spies a Stately Spiral Galaxy (NGC 5495)

Post by Ann » Wed Sep 28, 2022 6:27 pm

bystander wrote: Mon Sep 26, 2022 2:16 pm Hubble Spies a Stately Spiral Galaxy
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2022 Sep 26
The stately sweeping spiral arms of the spiral galaxy NGC 5495 are revealed by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) in this image. NGC 5495, which lies around 300 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Hydra, is a Seyfert galaxy, a type of galaxy with a particularly bright central region. These luminous cores — known to astronomers as active galactic nuclei — are dominated by the light emitted by dust and gas falling into a supermassive black hole.

This image is drawn from a series of observations captured by astronomers studying supermassive black holes lurking in the hearts of other galaxies. Studying the central regions of galaxies can be challenging: as well as the light created by matter falling into supermassive black holes, areas of star formation and the light from existing stars all contribute to the brightness of galactic cores. Hubble’s crystal-clear vision helped astronomers disentangle the various sources of light at the core of NGC 5495, allowing them to precisely weigh its supermassive black hole.

As well as NGC 5495, two stellar interlopers are visible in this image. One is just outside the centre of NGC 5495, and the other is very prominent alongside the galaxy. While they share the same location on the sky, these objects are much closer to home than NGC 5495: they are stars from our own Milky Way. The bright stars are surrounded by criss-cross diffraction spikes, optical artefacts created by the internal structure of Hubble interacting with starlight.
NGC 5495 is an interesting-looking galaxy. It looks big. It has very well-formed spiral arms which form a lot of young blue stars, but they also contain a bright old yellow population.

NGC 5495 thus resembles NGC 5371, which is also an elegant spiral with a lot of star formation in the arms, but also a bright old yellow population:

NGC 5371 Javier Gómez Laina.png
NGC 5371. Photo: Javier Gómez Laina.

NGC 5495 and NGC 5371 look like two impressive spirals that are as massive as they are elegant, rich in old stars and yet busily making myriads of new ones in their beautiful spiral arms.

An interesting difference is that the arms of NGC 5495 are quite "open", whereas the arms of NGC 5371 are much more tightly wound. I wonder if that means that NGC 5371 has a much more massive central black hole pulling at the arms than does NGC 5495.

Anyway. Both galaxies are situated, as seen from the Earth, right next to a bright red foreground star. Fancy that.

Ann
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