APOD: The Tarantula Zone (2022 Sep 16)

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APOD: The Tarantula Zone (2022 Sep 16)

Post by APOD Robot » Fri Sep 16, 2022 4:05 am

Image The Tarantula Zone

Explanation: The Tarantula Nebula, also known as 30 Doradus, is more than a thousand light-years in diameter, a giant star forming region within nearby satellite galaxy the Large Magellanic Cloud. About 180 thousand light-years away, it's the largest, most violent star forming region known in the whole Local Group of galaxies. The cosmic arachnid sprawls across this magnificent view, an assembly of image data from large space- and ground-based telescopes. Within the Tarantula (NGC 2070), intense radiation, stellar winds, and supernova shocks from the central young cluster of massive stars cataloged as R136 energize the nebular glow and shape the spidery filaments. Around the Tarantula are other star forming regions with young star clusters, filaments, and blown-out bubble-shaped clouds. In fact, the frame includes the site of the closest supernova in modern times, SN 1987A, at lower right. The rich field of view spans about 2 degrees or 4 full moons, in the southern constellation Dorado. But were the Tarantula Nebula closer, say 1,500 light-years distant like the Milky Way's own star forming Orion Nebula, it would take up half the sky.

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Re: APOD: The Tarantula Zone (2022 Sep 16)

Post by FLPhotoCatcher » Fri Sep 16, 2022 6:44 am

The write-up says that this contains data from the JWST. Is that correct, and if so, what did the JWST contribute?

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Re: APOD: The Tarantula Zone (2022 Sep 16)

Post by VictorBorun » Fri Sep 16, 2022 10:11 am

the site of the closest supernova in modern times, SN 1987A, at lower right
please, can anybody point that remnant

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Re: APOD: The Tarantula Zone (2022 Sep 16)

Post by AVAO » Fri Sep 16, 2022 12:05 pm

...
Congratulations to the dream team of the two creators. The picture is so visually stunning and yet detailed, I'm speechless!
VictorBorun wrote: Fri Sep 16, 2022 10:11 am
the site of the closest supernova in modern times, SN 1987A, at lower right
please, can anybody point that remnant
... almost starless ...

Image

... and slightly enhanced in red and magenta ...

Image
jac berne (flickr)

Original source: Image Credit & Copyright: Processing - Robert Gendler, Roberto Colombari
Data - Hubble Tarantula Treasury, European Southern Observatory, James Webb Space Telescope, Amateur Sources
Last edited by AVAO on Fri Sep 16, 2022 2:53 pm, edited 4 times in total.

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VictorBorun
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Re: APOD: The Tarantula Zone (2022 Sep 16)

Post by VictorBorun » Fri Sep 16, 2022 12:23 pm

AVAO wrote: Fri Sep 16, 2022 12:05 pm
VictorBorun wrote: Fri Sep 16, 2022 10:11 am
the site of the closest supernova in modern times, SN 1987A, at lower right
please, can anybody point that remnant
... almost starless...
Image
Image
jac berne (flickr)
thanks! Now, why do they emphasize that R136 is so young that it has no SNRs yet? What an SNR, say 300 or 3000 years old, would look like at this distance ?
Or do they mean just radio and X-rays bubbles, too faint in H-alpha red to see?

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Re: APOD: The Tarantula Zone (2022 Sep 16)

Post by orin stepanek » Fri Sep 16, 2022 2:51 pm

Tarantula-HST-ESO-Webb-SS1024.jpg
Tarantula-HST-ESO-annotated1800.jpg
Tarantula has the largest star forming area in the local group! Wow!
That's quite something for a small Galaxy! 8-)
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Re: APOD: The Tarantula Zone (2022 Sep 16)

Post by MarkBour » Fri Sep 16, 2022 3:42 pm

FLPhotoCatcher wrote: Fri Sep 16, 2022 6:44 am The write-up says that this contains data from the JWST. Is that correct, and if so, what did the JWST contribute?
Just click on the "James Webb Space Telescope" link in the Image credits part.
It looks like stars from the JWST that have spikes, have lots of spikes. 6 large ones and then more smaller.
The central R136 cluster was its target.
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Re: APOD: The Tarantula Zone (2022 Sep 16)

Post by De58te » Fri Sep 16, 2022 5:39 pm

FLPhotoCatcher wrote: Fri Sep 16, 2022 6:44 am The write-up says that this contains data from the JWST. Is that correct, and if so, what did the JWST contribute?
Here is the JWST contribution. It appears to have focused on the blue star cluster region near the center which they say is "only" 340 light years across.

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/20 ... asa-s-webb

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Re: APOD: The Tarantula Zone (2022 Sep 16)

Post by johnnydeep » Fri Sep 16, 2022 8:21 pm

Is the linked-to "bubble shaped" clouds N44 emission nebula complex in this image? I'm not finding it in the annotated image? It's in the LMC at least.
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Re: APOD: The Tarantula Zone (2022 Sep 16)

Post by MoonRockMan » Fri Sep 16, 2022 8:48 pm

orin stepanek wrote: Fri Sep 16, 2022 2:51 pm Tarantula-HST-ESO-Webb-SS1024.jpg
Tarantula-HST-ESO-annotated1800.jpg
Tarantula has the largest star forming area in the local group! Wow!
That's quite something for a small Galaxy! 8-)
Thank you so much the for annotated image! That's great.

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Re: APOD: The Tarantula Zone (2022 Sep 16)

Post by orin stepanek » Sat Sep 17, 2022 12:26 pm

MoonRockMan wrote: Fri Sep 16, 2022 8:48 pm
orin stepanek wrote: Fri Sep 16, 2022 2:51 pm Tarantula-HST-ESO-Webb-SS1024.jpg
Tarantula-HST-ESO-annotated1800.jpg
Tarantula has the largest star forming area in the local group! Wow!
That's quite something for a small Galaxy! 8-)
Thank you so much the for annotated image! That's great.
You're welcome! :D
Orin

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Re: APOD: The Tarantula Zone (2022 Sep 16)

Post by FLPhotoCatcher » Sun Sep 18, 2022 5:44 am

De58te wrote: Fri Sep 16, 2022 5:39 pm
FLPhotoCatcher wrote: Fri Sep 16, 2022 6:44 am The write-up says that this contains data from the JWST. Is that correct, and if so, what did the JWST contribute?
Here is the JWST contribution. It appears to have focused on the blue star cluster region near the center which they say is "only" 340 light years across.

https://www.nasa.gov/feature/goddard/20 ... asa-s-webb
Thanks.