Found Images: 2022 November

See new, spectacular, or mysterious sky images.
starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2022 November

Post by starsurfer » Mon Nov 14, 2022 11:18 pm

IC 1396 and Sh2-132
https://www.astrobin.com/314500/
Copyright: Rolf Dietrich
ClsmEOaw0OJo_16536x16536_JUsogMhh.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 November

Post by starsurfer » Sun Nov 20, 2022 11:41 pm

IC 1276 and LDN 430
http://www.capella-observatory.com/Imag ... lomar7.htm
Copyright: Josef Pöpsel, Stefan Binnewies and Frank Sackenheim
IC1276.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 November

Post by starsurfer » Sun Nov 20, 2022 11:43 pm

Abell 22
https://www.chart32.de/index.php/component/k2/item/356
Copyright: CHART32
Processing: Bernd Flach-Wilken

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NOIRLab: Beginning to End of a Total Lunar Eclipse

Post by bystander » Mon Nov 21, 2022 12:14 am

Beginning to End of a Total Lunar Eclipse
NOIRLab Image of the Week | 2022 Nov 16
This still image combines hundreds of time-lapse exposures that capture the entirety of the 8 November 2022 total lunar eclipse above the Nicholas U. Mayall 4-meter Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory, a Program of NSF’s NOIRLab. Lunar eclipses occur when the Moon passes through the shadow of Earth. During a total lunar eclipse, when the whole Moon enters Earth’s shadow, our natural satellite is drenched in red. The period of totality is evident in this image by the red at the center of the lunar light ‘string.’ The other long streaks of light in the night sky are stars. These star trails form in the camera image as Earth turns. Polaris, the North Star, is the smallest trail in the top right corner of the image. On the ground, an observer drives down the hill, as revealed by the streak of their red tail lights, from the Mayall telescope.

The previous Image of the Week of this eclipse here linking to many different images and videos of this event. Another view of last week’s Image of the Week can be found here.
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ESO: A Window to the Galaxy (ESO 1.52-metre)

Post by bystander » Mon Nov 21, 2022 8:22 pm

A Window to the Galaxy
ESO Picture of the Week | 2022 Nov 21
he ESO 1.52-metre telescope gazes at the Milky Way from its home at La Silla Observatory in this Picture of the Week. The now retired telescope has uncovered many of the Universe's secrets. Its most popular instrument was the B&C spectrograph, used for almost 30 years to study stars, galaxies and comets. Another instrument, ECHELEC, helped astronomers understand the intense winds of Wolf-Rayet stars, and FEROS discovered exciting exoplanets. When the telescope was decommissioned in 2002, FEROS was moved to the MPG/ESO 2.2-metre telescope, also in La Silla, where it still searches for distant new worlds.

Through the dome’s opening we can see the pink-shaded Carina Nebula, home to some of the most massive and luminous stars in our galaxy. Further down, to the centre-left of the slit, there’s the Coalsack Nebula, a dark cloud of dust. Let’s finish with a quiz: the four stars of the Southern Cross, which appear in the ESO logo, can also be seen here. Can you spot them? Here’s a clue.
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ESA: Hubble Hunts an Unusual Galaxy (AM 417-391)

Post by bystander » Mon Nov 21, 2022 8:51 pm

Hubble Hunts an Unusual Galaxy
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2022 Nov 21
The galaxy merger Arp-Madore 417-391 steals the spotlight in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The Arp-Madore catalogue is a collection of particularly peculiar galaxies spread throughout the southern sky, and includes a collection of subtly interacting galaxies as well as more spectacular colliding galaxies. Arp-Madore 417-391, which lies around 670 million light-years away in the constellation Eridanus in the southern celestial hemisphere, is one such galactic collision. The two galaxies have been distorted by gravity and twisted into a colossal ring, leaving the cores of the two galaxies nestled side by side.

Hubble used its Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) to capture this scene — the instrument is optimised to hunt for galaxies and galaxy clusters in the ancient Universe. Hubble’s ACS has been contributing to scientific discovery for 20 years, and throughout its lifetime it has been involved in everything from mapping the distribution of dark matter to studying the evolution of galaxy clusters.

This image comes from a selection of Hubble observations designed to create a list of intriguing targets for follow-up observations with the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), as well as other ground-based telescopes. Astronomers chose a list of previously unobserved galaxies for Hubble to inspect between other scheduled observations. Over time, this lets astronomers build up a menagerie of interesting galaxies while using Hubble’s limited observing time as fully as possible.
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Re: Found Images: 2022 November

Post by starsurfer » Tue Nov 22, 2022 11:22 pm

NGC 6781
https://www.astrobin.com/915jxc/C/
Copyright: Niels V. Christensen
uW_WKX5ZMMue_2560x0_UgIYlJOz.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 November

Post by starsurfer » Tue Nov 22, 2022 11:25 pm

vdB149 and vdB150
https://galaxyphoto.de/de/vdb150-de/
Copyright: Michael Deger
vdB150.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 November

Post by starsurfer » Tue Nov 22, 2022 11:26 pm

vdB141
https://www.astrobin.com/8t4jys/
Copyright: Alejandro López
MX4IFZvVP_sk_2560x0_jaUALzhf.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 November

Post by starsurfer » Tue Nov 22, 2022 11:28 pm

NGC 654 region
https://www.astrobin.com/j75lst/C/
Copyright: Andreas Zirke
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Re: Found Images: 2022 November

Post by starsurfer » Tue Nov 22, 2022 11:30 pm

Abell 262
https://www.astrobin.com/sxx5t2/
Copyright: Bart Delsaert
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NOIRLanb: Galactic Quartet (NGC 6845)

Post by bystander » Thu Nov 24, 2022 5:20 am

Galactic Quartet
NOIRLab Image of the Week | 2022 Nov 23
A quartet of interacting galaxies is captured in this observation from Gemini South, which is one of the twin telescopes of the International Gemini Observatory, operated by NSF’s NOIRLab. The four galaxies in this image are collectively known as NGC 6845, and lie roughly 270 million light-years from Earth in a constellation named, appropriately, Telescopium. This constellation is one of a handful named after scientific instruments rather than animals or mythological figures.

The galaxies in NGC 6845 come in two varieties: the pair of galaxies at the top of this image are well-defined spiral galaxies whereas the two below them are disk-shaped lenticular galaxies. Connecting the galaxies is evidence of star-forming regions and filaments made of stars detached from their original galaxies. Being relatively close neighbors, the galaxies in NGC 6845 are interacting. These gravitational interactions are subtly distorting the galaxies in NGC 6845, and astronomers believe that the two spiral galaxies will eventually evolve into lenticular galaxies.
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Re: Found Images: 2022 November

Post by Mauro Rorato » Sun Nov 27, 2022 2:05 pm

IC 434 is an emission nebula visible in the constellation Orion; thanks to its presence it is possible to observe the famous Horsehead Nebula, a dark cloud that overlaps it on our line of sight.

At the bottom left we find NGC 2023, a small nebula that shines by reflection of the light produced by the star HD 37903, of spectral class B5, from which it takes its markedly bluish color; this is the southernmost illuminated part of Orion B.

At the top left enters the blue light of the star Alnitak, one of the three stars in Orion's belt

Mauro

https://themaurosky.wixsite.com/astroph ... di-cavallo
d3e31f_162b9a189069421d88638318ed899dc3~mv2[1].png
https://static.wixstatic.com/media/d3e3 ... c3~mv2.png
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starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2022 November

Post by starsurfer » Sun Nov 27, 2022 11:35 pm

IC 4653
https://esahubble.org/images/potw1942a/
Copyright: ESA/Hubble & NASA, D. Rosario (CEA, Durham University)

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Re: Found Images: 2022 November

Post by starsurfer » Sun Nov 27, 2022 11:36 pm


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ESA: Revisiting a Celestial Fireworks Display (DEM L 190)

Post by bystander » Mon Nov 28, 2022 6:31 pm

Revisiting a Celestial Fireworks Display
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2022 Nov 28
Shreds of the luridly coloured supernova remnant DEM L 190 seem to billow across the screen in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The delicate sheets and intricate filaments are debris from the cataclysmic death of a massive star that once lived in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small satellite galaxy of the Milky Way. DEM L 190 — also known as LMC N49 — is the brightest supernova remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud and lies approximately 160 000 light-years away from Earth in the constellation Dorado.

This striking image was created with data from two different astronomical investigations, using one of Hubble’s retired instruments, the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). This instrument has since been replaced by the more powerful Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), but during its operational lifetime it contributed to cutting-edge science and produced a series of stunning public outreach images. The first of the two WFPC2 investigations used DEM L 190 as a natural laboratory in which to study the interaction of supernova remnants and the interstellar medium, the tenuous mixture of gas and dust that lies between stars. In the second project, astronomers turned to Hubble to pinpoint the origin of a Soft Gamma-ray Repeater, an enigmatic object lurking in DEM L 190 which repeatedly emits high-energy bursts of gamma rays

This is not the first image of DEM L 190 to be released to the public — a previous Hubble portrait of this supernova remnant was published in 2003. This new image incorporates additional data and improved image processing techniques, making this spectacular celestial fireworks display even more striking!
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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Re: ESA: Revisiting a Celestial Fireworks Display (DEM L 190)

Post by starsurfer » Mon Nov 28, 2022 11:15 pm

bystander wrote: Mon Nov 28, 2022 6:31 pm Revisiting a Celestial Fireworks Display
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2022 Nov 28
Shreds of the luridly coloured supernova remnant DEM L 190 seem to billow across the screen in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The delicate sheets and intricate filaments are debris from the cataclysmic death of a massive star that once lived in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a small satellite galaxy of the Milky Way. DEM L 190 — also known as LMC N49 — is the brightest supernova remnant in the Large Magellanic Cloud and lies approximately 160 000 light-years away from Earth in the constellation Dorado.

This striking image was created with data from two different astronomical investigations, using one of Hubble’s retired instruments, the Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). This instrument has since been replaced by the more powerful Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), but during its operational lifetime it contributed to cutting-edge science and produced a series of stunning public outreach images. The first of the two WFPC2 investigations used DEM L 190 as a natural laboratory in which to study the interaction of supernova remnants and the interstellar medium, the tenuous mixture of gas and dust that lies between stars. In the second project, astronomers turned to Hubble to pinpoint the origin of a Soft Gamma-ray Repeater, an enigmatic object lurking in DEM L 190 which repeatedly emits high-energy bursts of gamma rays

This is not the first image of DEM L 190 to be released to the public — a previous Hubble portrait of this supernova remnant was published in 2003. This new image incorporates additional data and improved image processing techniques, making this spectacular celestial fireworks display even more striking!
Such a joy to see an extragalactic SNR like this in such exquisite detail! I'm so happy I wish I could hug Ann! :D

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Re: Found Images: 2022 November

Post by starsurfer » Mon Nov 28, 2022 11:19 pm

NGC 1528 and Sh2-209
https://www.astrobin.com/mji559/
Copyright: Marcus Jungwirth
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Re: Found Images: 2022 November

Post by starsurfer » Mon Nov 28, 2022 11:19 pm


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Re: Found Images: 2022 November

Post by starsurfer » Mon Nov 28, 2022 11:21 pm

NGC 7129
https://www.astrobin.com/udx41k/
Copyright: Martin Voigt
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Mars - Nov. 28th

Post by Efrain Morales » Tue Nov 29, 2022 6:21 pm

Mars on November 28th, 04:34 ut. Approaching opposition closest to Earth on Dec. 1st and to the Sun on Dec. 8th. Schiaparelli, Hellas Planitia, Syrtis Major Planum regions.
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ESA: Galactic Get-Together (II ZW 96)

Post by bystander » Thu Dec 01, 2022 7:53 am

Galactic Get-Together
ESA Webb Picture of the Month | 2022 Nov 30
Click to view full size image 1 or image 2
Image Credit: ESA/Webb, NASA & CSA, L. Armus, A. Evans;
Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration

A merging galaxy pair cavort in this image captured by the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope. This pair of galaxies, known to astronomers as II ZW 96, is roughly 500 million light-years from Earth and lies in the constellation Delphinus, close to the celestial equator. As well as the wild swirl of the merging galaxies, a menagerie of background galaxies are dotted throughout the image.

The two galaxies are in the process of merging and as a result have a chaotic, disturbed shape. The bright cores of the two galaxies are connected by bright tendrils of star-forming regions, and the spiral arms of the lower galaxy have been twisted out of shape by the gravitational perturbation of the galaxy merger. It is these star-forming regions that made II ZW 96 such a tempting target for Webb; the galaxy pair is particularly bright at infrared wavelengths thanks to the presence of the star formation.

This observation is from a collection of Webb measurements delving into the details of galactic evolution, in particular in nearby Luminous Infrared Galaxies such as II ZW 96. These galaxies, as the name suggests, are particularly bright at infrared wavelengths, with luminosities more than 100 billion times that of the Sun. An international team of astronomers proposed a study of complex galactic ecosystems — including the merging galaxies in II ZW 96 — to put Webb through its paces soon after the telescope was commissioned. Their chosen targets have already been observed with ground-based telescopes and the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, which will provide astronomers with insights into Webb’s ability to unravel the details of complex galactic environments. ...
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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Re: ESA: Galactic Get-Together (II ZW 96)

Post by starsurfer » Thu Dec 01, 2022 11:32 pm

bystander wrote: Thu Dec 01, 2022 7:53 am Galactic Get-Together
ESA Webb Picture of the Month | 2022 Nov 30
Click to view full size image 1 or image 2
Image Credit: ESA/Webb, NASA & CSA, L. Armus, A. Evans;
Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA)-ESA/Hubble Collaboration

A merging galaxy pair cavort in this image captured by the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope. This pair of galaxies, known to astronomers as II ZW 96, is roughly 500 million light-years from Earth and lies in the constellation Delphinus, close to the celestial equator. As well as the wild swirl of the merging galaxies, a menagerie of background galaxies are dotted throughout the image.

The two galaxies are in the process of merging and as a result have a chaotic, disturbed shape. The bright cores of the two galaxies are connected by bright tendrils of star-forming regions, and the spiral arms of the lower galaxy have been twisted out of shape by the gravitational perturbation of the galaxy merger. It is these star-forming regions that made II ZW 96 such a tempting target for Webb; the galaxy pair is particularly bright at infrared wavelengths thanks to the presence of the star formation.

This observation is from a collection of Webb measurements delving into the details of galactic evolution, in particular in nearby Luminous Infrared Galaxies such as II ZW 96. These galaxies, as the name suggests, are particularly bright at infrared wavelengths, with luminosities more than 100 billion times that of the Sun. An international team of astronomers proposed a study of complex galactic ecosystems — including the merging galaxies in II ZW 96 — to put Webb through its paces soon after the telescope was commissioned. Their chosen targets have already been observed with ground-based telescopes and the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, which will provide astronomers with insights into Webb’s ability to unravel the details of complex galactic environments. ...
OMG! I'm so happy I wish I could hug Judy! :D

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Re: ESA: Galactic Get-Together (II ZW 96)

Post by bystander » Thu Dec 01, 2022 11:48 pm

starsurfer wrote: Thu Dec 01, 2022 11:32 pm
OMG! I'm so happy I wish I could hug Judy! :D
??? I'm not sure I understand the reasoning.
I'm sure she probably deserves it, but ???
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor