Found Images: 2022 December

See new, spectacular, or mysterious sky images.
User avatar
bystander
Apathetic Retiree
Posts: 21263
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:06 pm
Location: Oklahoma

Found Images: 2022 December

Post by bystander » Thu Dec 01, 2022 7:59 am


Have you seen a great image or video somewhere that you think would make a great APOD? Nominate it for APOD! Please post as much information here as you have about the image/video with a link to any source(s) for it you know of here, and the editors will take a look.

When posting the image itself, please do not post anything larger than a thumbnail here; please honor the copyright holder's copyright.

Please keep hotlinked images under 500K.

Thank you!

<< Previously
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2022 December

Post by starsurfer » Thu Dec 01, 2022 11:36 pm

StDr 1
https://www.astrobin.com/2o4to3/
Copyright: Jerry Macon
N75qgSX6CKZM_16536x0_DANEPLWO.jpg
This is the first entry of the StDr catalogue of planetary nebulae started by Marcel Drechsler and Xavier Strottner in 2019.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2022 December

Post by starsurfer » Thu Dec 01, 2022 11:40 pm

Patchick 28
https://www.imagingdeepspace.com/pa28.html
Copyright: Peter Goodhew
MXRb5oE73lua_16536x16536_UioLiwJR.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2022 December

Post by starsurfer » Sat Dec 03, 2022 11:43 pm

NGC 4194
https://esahubble.org/images/potw1939a/
Copyright: ESA/Hubble & NASA, A. Adamo

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2022 December

Post by starsurfer » Sat Dec 03, 2022 11:46 pm


barretosmed
Science Officer
Posts: 387
Joined: Thu Oct 12, 2017 6:04 pm

Re: Found Images: 2022 December

Post by barretosmed » Sun Dec 04, 2022 12:03 am

The Sagittarius Star Cloud (Messier 24) - MOSAIC


BEST DETAILS
https://www.astrobin.com/full/nkagc8/0/

EQUIPMENT:
Esprit 150mm triplet
ASI 6200mc
Mount CEM120

THERE ARE 4 IMAGES OF (MOSAIC)
98X300" and 50x30"
96x300" and 50x30"
110x300" and 50x30"
93x300" and 50x30"

LOCATION: Munhoz - MG - Brazil
DATES: 08/01/2022 to 10/24/2022

Copyright: Fernando Oliveira de Menezes
eMAIL: Barretosmed@hotmail.com
(Organizing author of the book Amateur Astrophotography in Brazil)
https://clubedeautores.com.br/livro/ast ... -no-brasil
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
bystander
Apathetic Retiree
Posts: 21263
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:06 pm
Location: Oklahoma

ESA: Head in the Clouds (NGC 376)

Post by bystander » Mon Dec 05, 2022 4:19 pm

Head in the Clouds
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2022 Dec 05
A small portion of the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) is pictured in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. The SMC is a dwarf galaxy and one of the Milky Way’s nearest neighbours, lying only about 200 000 light-years from Earth. It makes a pair with the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), and both objects can be seen from the southern hemisphere, as well as from some northern latitudes.

The Small Magellanic Cloud contains hundreds of millions of stars, but this image focuses on just a small fraction of them. These stars comprise the open cluster NGC 376, which has a total mass only about 3400 times that of the Sun. Open clusters, as the name suggests, are loosely bound and sparsely populated. This distinguishes open clusters from globular clusters, which are often so thronged with stars that they have a continuous blur of starlight at their centres. In the case of NGC 376, individual stars can be picked out clearly even in the most densely populated parts of this image.

The data in this image come from two different astronomical investigations which relied on two of Hubble’s instruments: the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). The first investigation used the ACS to explore a handful of star clusters in the Small Magellanic Cloud and help astronomers explore topics including the abundance of low- and high-mass stars in different environments. The second investigation used both the WFC3 and ACS, and aimed to answer fundamental questions about the lives of stars and help astronomers understand precisely where, when, why and how stars form.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2022 December

Post by starsurfer » Mon Dec 05, 2022 11:00 pm

NGC 6822
http://www.cielaustral.com/galerie/photo140.htm
Copyright: Ciel Austral
photo140.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2022 December

Post by starsurfer » Mon Dec 05, 2022 11:04 pm

NGC 55
https://www.hansonastronomy.com/ngc-55
Copyright: Mark Hanson
NGC-55.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2022 December

Post by starsurfer » Mon Dec 05, 2022 11:08 pm

Maa 1
https://www.astrobin.com/mkm0e1/H/
Copyright: Peter Maasewerd
90j-UEC02rJN_16536x0_GfcyilEy.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
bystander
Apathetic Retiree
Posts: 21263
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:06 pm
Location: Oklahoma

Hubble Observes an Outstanding Open Cluster

Post by bystander » Wed Dec 07, 2022 12:34 am

Hubble Observes an Outstanding Open Cluster
NASA | GSFC | Hubble | 2022 Dec 05
A twinkling group of stars dominates the center of this image. NGC 2002 is an open star cluster that resides roughly 160,000 light-years away from Earth in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite galaxy of our Milky Way containing numerous star-forming regions. NGC 2002 is about 30 light-years in diameter and is a relatively young cluster at 18 million years old.

The Large and Small Magellanic Clouds (LMC, SMC) are rich in young star clusters, making them ideal laboratories for studying stellar formation and evolution. In fact, the LMC and SMC are the only systems that contain star clusters at all stages of evolution while also being near enough to Earth to be fully resolved, meaning that one can make out and study individual stars.

NGC 2002 is more spherical than a typical open cluster, which is a type of star cluster that has low star density and an irregular shape due to the weak mutual gravitational attraction of its constituent stars. Individual stars in an open cluster can generally be observed, while the stars in a globular cluster – the other main type of cluster – are often too dense to make out even with powerful telescopes. Researchers used Hubble’s high resolution and sensitivity at discerning individual stars to study NGC 2002.

NGC 2002 contains about 1,100 stars. The more massive stars in the cluster tend to sink inwards towards the center, while the lighter stars move away from the center as the cluster evolves. Visible in the center of the cluster are five red supergiants, which are physically massive but cooler stars that are fusing helium after exhausting their hydrogen fuel.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

User avatar
bystander
Apathetic Retiree
Posts: 21263
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:06 pm
Location: Oklahoma

Hubble Spots Bright Splash of Stars Amid Ripples of Gas and Dust

Post by bystander » Wed Dec 07, 2022 12:37 am

Hubble Spots Bright Splash of Stars Amid Ripples of Gas and Dust
NASA | GSFC | Hubble | 2022 Dec 06
Open cluster KMHK 1231 is a group of stars loosely bound by gravity. Seen in the upper right of this Hubble Space Telescope image, this cluster in the Large Magellanic Cloud is surrounded by a crimson nebula of gas and dust extending across the image, where new stars may someday form. Orange and red in this image indicates visible and near-infrared light, respectively.

Open clusters are found in spiral and irregular galaxies, where star formation is common. They tend to form from the same cloud of gas and dust, so their stars share characteristics like age and chemical composition, providing excellent laboratories for studying how stars form and evolve. After a few million years, they may disperse into their galaxies. Hubble observed this particular cluster as part of a program to examine how ultraviolet light is absorbed by the material that exists in space between Earth and the Large Magellanic Cloud. This information helps astronomers discover how much light objects in the satellite galaxy to the Milky Way truly emanate, critical to determining the characteristics of these objects.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

User avatar
bystander
Apathetic Retiree
Posts: 21263
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:06 pm
Location: Oklahoma

NOIRLab: Coloring the Night (Great Rift, Ophiuchus)

Post by bystander » Wed Dec 07, 2022 8:54 pm

Coloring the Night
NOIRLab Image of the Week | 2022 Dec 07
Looking past Earth’s brightly lit atmosphere, incredibly brilliant and colorful celestial objects exist in the vast expanse of space. The Milky Way is the most conspicuous of these nighttime objects, captured here near Cerro Pachón in Chile, home to several facilities operated by NSF's NOIRLab, including half of the International Gemini Observatory, the SOAR Telescope and Vera C. Rubin Observatory. The Milky Way’s luminous disk is partially obscured by the interstellar clouds of dust known as the Great Rift. Some of the rift’s dark nebulae fragments appear to stretch into the nearby neighborhood of nebulae. The small grouping of colors is known as the Rho Ophiuchi cloud complex, a dynamic bunch made of reflection nebulae, scattering bright blue and yellow hues from nearby stars, and emission nebulae, diffusing the reddish glow of hot hydrogen gas. Hidden among this interstellar complex are the stars Rho Ophiuchi itself and the ‘heart’ of Scorpius, Antares. ‘Above’ this vibrant group is a much larger deep red emission nebula known as Sh2-27, surrounding the star Zeta Ophiuchi.

The diffuse light to the right of the center is the gegenschein, which is caused by sunlight that is scattered back from dust particles in the outer Solar System. The dust that produces the zodiacal light and Gegenschein comes from a variety of sources, including comet tails and asteroid collisions.

This 170-megapixel photo was taken as part of the recent NOIRLab 2022 Photo Expedition to all the NOIRLab sites. Explore the details of the image with the zoom feature.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2022 December

Post by starsurfer » Thu Dec 08, 2022 11:37 pm

M78
https://www.astrobin.com/ynhkfy/
Copyright: Masahiro Takahashi
xaluvdLS8PSY_2560x0_qko5Tvbp.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2022 December

Post by starsurfer » Thu Dec 08, 2022 11:40 pm

Sh2-264
https://www.astrobin.com/6r69sh/E/
Copyright: Maxim Valenko
7YK8eQDw565Y_16536x16536_8pHGERZ7.jpg
The planetary nebula WDHS 1 (or WeDe 1) can be seen near the top left corner.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
bystander
Apathetic Retiree
Posts: 21263
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:06 pm
Location: Oklahoma

ESO: A Flame Thrower (Messier 66)

Post by bystander » Mon Dec 12, 2022 2:43 pm

A Flame Thrower
ESO Picture of the Week | 2022 Dec 12
The NGC 3627 galaxy, also known as Messier 66, appears to be expelling flames out of its majestic spiral arms in this Picture of the Week. The “fire” actually marks clouds of cold molecular gas, which is the material out of which stars form, and has been captured using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) in Chile, of which ESO is a partner. The bluish regions in the background reveal the pattern of older, already formed stars, imaged by the Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) on ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) also in Chile.

Located approximately 31 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Leo, NGC 3627 is one of the many galaxies observed as part of the Physics at High Angular resolution in Nearby GalaxieS (PHANGS) project. PHANGS is making high-resolution observations of nearby galaxies with telescopes operating across all colours or wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum. Different wavelengths can reveal a multitude of secrets about a galaxy, and by comparing them astronomers are able to study what triggers, boosts or hinders the birth of new stars.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

User avatar
bystander
Apathetic Retiree
Posts: 21263
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:06 pm
Location: Oklahoma

ESA: Cosmic Smokescreen (NGC 6530)

Post by bystander » Mon Dec 12, 2022 2:56 pm

Cosmic Smokescreen
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2022 Dec 12
A portion of the open cluster NGC 6530 appears as a roiling wall of smoke studded with stars in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. NGC 6530 is a collection of several thousand stars lying around 4350 light-years from Earth in the constellation Sagittarius. The cluster is set within the larger Lagoon Nebula, a gigantic interstellar cloud of gas and dust. It is the nebula that gives this image its distinctly smokey appearance; clouds of interstellar gas and dust stretch from one side of this image to the other.

Astronomers investigated NGC 6530 using Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). They scoured the region in the hope of finding new examples of proplyds, a particular class of illuminated protoplanetary discs surrounding newborn stars. The vast majority of proplyds have been found in only one region, the nearby Orion Nebula. This makes understanding their origin and lifetimes in other astronomical environments challenging.

Hubble’s ability to observe at infrared wavelengths — particularly with Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) — have made it an indispensable tool for understanding starbirth and the origin of exoplanetary systems. In particular, Hubble was crucial to investigations of the proplyds around newly born stars in the Orion Nebula. The new NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope’s (JWST) unprecedented observational capabilities at infrared wavelengths will complement Hubble observations by allowing astronomers to peer through the dusty envelopes around newly born stars and investigate the faintest, earliest stages of starbirth.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2022 December

Post by starsurfer » Mon Dec 12, 2022 11:28 pm


starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2022 December

Post by starsurfer » Mon Dec 12, 2022 11:31 pm

IC 447 region
http://www.astrostudio.at/1_Deep%20Sky% ... _IC447.jpg
Copyright: Gerald Rhemann
IC447.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
bystander
Apathetic Retiree
Posts: 21263
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:06 pm
Location: Oklahoma

NOIRLab: Big Telescope, Bigger Moon

Post by bystander » Wed Dec 14, 2022 8:39 pm

Big Telescope, Bigger Moon
NOIRLab Image of the Week | 2022 Dec 14
A full Moon is arguably the worst time to do any optical astronomy, whether it’s with a backyard telescope or at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO), a Program of NSF’s NOIRLab, near Tucson, Arizona. But the full Moon does make for a spectacular view to the naked eye and in this shot beautifully illuminates the surrounding desert landscape. Taken from close to Tucson, several tens of miles/kilometers from KPNO, this image appears to show the Nicholas U. Mayall 4-meter Telescope (Mayall 4m) eclipsing nearly half the diameter of the Moon after moonrise. The Mayall telescope is home to the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI). DESI, led by the US Department of Energy, is acquiring the spectra of tens of millions of galaxies and quasars to construct a 3D map that will reveal the effects of dark energy in the Universe.

This image was taken before the 2022 Contreras Fire, which affected KPNO. Read more here.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2022 December

Post by starsurfer » Wed Dec 14, 2022 11:31 pm


starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2022 December

Post by starsurfer » Wed Dec 14, 2022 11:35 pm

NGC 4631 and NGC 4656
https://www.astrobin.com/w37wrw/B/
Copyright: Bart Delsaert
RQ14_MDYSWdD_16536x0_U2NWvvjJ.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2022 December

Post by starsurfer » Wed Dec 14, 2022 11:37 pm

Hickson 44
https://www.astrobin.com/xqyy0m/
Copyright: Don Reed
l5HK7fVBWWJq_16536x0_puobbmOH.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2022 December

Post by starsurfer » Wed Dec 14, 2022 11:39 pm

IC 1613
https://www.astrobin.com/44h3wh/B/
Copyright: Jan Sjoerd de Vries
uuwX40GKdSLs_16536x16536_idU37VlX.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2022 December

Post by starsurfer » Wed Dec 14, 2022 11:41 pm

M33
https://www.astrobin.com/muxmi8/
Copyright: Pavel Karavatskiy
GQtJ2yPgW3fM_16536x0_reDfql3U.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.