APOD: Jones-Emberson 1 (2023 Feb 24)

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APOD: Jones-Emberson 1 (2023 Feb 24)

Post by APOD Robot » Fri Feb 24, 2023 5:05 am

Image Jones-Emberson 1

Explanation: Planetary nebula Jones-Emberson 1 is the death shroud of a dying Sun-like star. It lies some 1,600 light-years from Earth toward the sharp-eyed constellation Lynx. About 4 light-years across, the expanding remnant of the dying star's atmosphere was shrugged off into interstellar space, as the star's central supply of hydrogen and then helium for fusion was finally depleted after billions of years. Visible near the center of the planetary nebula is what remains of the stellar core, a blue-hot white dwarf star. Also known as PK 164 +31.1, the nebula is faint and very difficult to glimpse at a telescope's eyepiece. But this deep broadband image combining 22 hours of exposure time does show it off in exceptional detail. Stars within our own Milky Way galaxy as well as background galaxies across the universe are scattered through the clear field of view. Ephemeral on the cosmic stage, Jones-Emberson 1 will fade away over the next few thousand years. Its hot, central white dwarf star will take billions of years to cool.

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Ann
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Re: APOD: Jones-Emberson 1 (2023 Feb 24)

Post by Ann » Fri Feb 24, 2023 7:18 am

That's a great image! :D


As a Color Commentator, I need you to look at the colors first. Note that the central white dwarf star inside the planetary nebula is the bluest object in the image, because it is the hottest thing here. The "surface temperature" of the white dwarf is probably at least 50,000 K, and it could be more.

The reason why the white dwarf is so hot is because it is the naked exposed core of what used to be a normal star. Our own Sun, after all, has a core temperature of about 15 million K. But the core of our Sun is wrapped inside a radius of some ~600,000 kilometers (some ~400,000 miles) of thick gas, which brings the mean temperature of the photosphere (the visible "surface") of the Sun down to some 5,777 K. Thank you, that's much better than 15 million K!

The white dwarf inside Jones-Emberson 1 has shrugged off all the gas that once surrounded its blisteringly hot core. You can see the remnant of that former cosy gas coat as the quite spherical red shell surrounding the white dwarf. The roundness of the outer part of the shell suggests to me that the gas was ejected quite symmetrically in all directions, and this in turn suggests to me that the central star was a single star. The red color of the shell shows that it is rich in hydrogen, and that the hydrogen has been ionized by the harsh ultraviolet light from the central star.

But the inner edge of the red shell is not spherical. This suggests to me that the white dwarf is emitting some sort of jets, to carve out the "fat figure eight shape" that we see in the inner part of the planetary nebula. Obviously those "jets" would be nothing like the jets from a pulsar, but maybe possibly maybe they would be like a very little baby brother of the pulsar jets:


[youtube]https://www.youtube.com/shorts/IhamKR0bYm4[/youtube]


Note while the inner "fat figure eight shape" is very rarefied, we do see a bit of green here. The green color comes from doubly ionized oxygen. It turns out that extremely rarefied concentrations of gas near extremely energetic sources is precisely the sort of conditions that favor this kind of ionization in oxygen.

Also note the absolute wealth of background galaxies here! Wowzers!!! :shock:

APOD 24 February 2023 detail.png

Most of the background galaxies are yellow-orange in color. They are reddened mostly by distance, because their light has been "stretched" to longer, redder wavelengths by the expansion of the Universe. But several of them are also intrinsically yellowish, because they contain no (or extremely few) young stars.

Anyway, great image! :D

Ann
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Re: APOD: Jones-Emberson 1 (2023 Feb 24)

Post by jeffbax » Fri Feb 24, 2023 10:53 am

Thank you Ann for this very interesting description. We are very proud of this deep image.

Best,

JF BAX

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Re: APOD: Jones-Emberson 1 (2023 Feb 24)

Post by AVAO » Fri Feb 24, 2023 8:20 pm

APOD Robot wrote: Fri Feb 24, 2023 5:05 am Image Jones-Emberson 1
Congratulations on this team effort. The picture is amazing and BETTER than all HUBBLE images from the same object.
I'm speechless...

Astrobin Comments:
"The quantity and quality of distant galaxies in this image is incredible."
"The luminance data with such exceptional seeing makes this one of the most incredible images."
"The galaxies that are visible through the PN creates the illusion of looking through some kind of a cosmic window."
"Its like a Hubble Deep-Field, but for a 1 meter aperture telescope. I can't believe there's so many tiny galaxies hidden in the field of view! "
"I have no words: THIS is called "Deep Sky"!"
"Mindblowing"
Last edited by AVAO on Sat Feb 25, 2023 4:53 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: APOD: Jones-Emberson 1 (2023 Feb 24)

Post by Fred the Cat » Sat Feb 25, 2023 12:18 am

Beautiful eye peering from a long way away. Clear enough we could echo light off its cornea to see ourselves looking pale. :wink:

Reflect on that while gazing at this gorgeous image! :ssmile:
Freddy's Felicity "Only ascertain as a cat box survivor"

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Re: APOD: Jones-Emberson 1 (2023 Feb 24)

Post by jeffbax » Sat Feb 25, 2023 9:34 pm

AVAO wrote: Fri Feb 24, 2023 8:20 pm
APOD Robot wrote: Fri Feb 24, 2023 5:05 am Image Jones-Emberson 1
Congratulations on this team effort. The picture is amazing and BETTER than all HUBBLE images from the same object.
I'm speechless...

Astrobin Comments:
"The quantity and quality of distant galaxies in this image is incredible."
"The luminance data with such exceptional seeing makes this one of the most incredible images."
"The galaxies that are visible through the PN creates the illusion of looking through some kind of a cosmic window."
"Its like a Hubble Deep-Field, but for a 1 meter aperture telescope. I can't believe there's so many tiny galaxies hidden in the field of view! "
"I have no words: THIS is called "Deep Sky"!"
"Mindblowing"
Thank you so much for this message.

JF