Submissions: 2023 October

See new, spectacular, or mysterious sky images.
SH2-119. The clamshell nebula

Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by SH2-119. The clamshell nebula » Sun Oct 29, 2023 8:46 am

Alex Battù and Luca Barcaro would like to submit SH2-119, the clamshell nebula.

2200 years ago, when the photons of light left this nebula to reach us, the Earth was definitely another place. The cosmic time machine, the telescope, this time was pointed towards the constellation Cygnus, more precisely towards Sh2-119. Gas and dust envelop the main star, 68-Cygni being mostly responsible for the ionization of the gas around it. This ionization makes the gases all colored at different wavelengths, from blue to green, passing through all shades of brown and orange. The dark nebula filaments above contrast strongly with both the glow of the nebula and the rich field full of stars in the background. These filaments are clouds containing mostly gas (hydrogen and helium) and a minimal fraction of dust (about 1%), responsible for the appearance of the cloud. These dusts, although minimal, absorb the light, making the nebula completely dark. Sh2-119 is a celestial signature of an ancient explosion that released gas and dust into the universe, forming new stars and planets. The silk effect of the nebula makes us think of a white colored pillow in a bed of stars, but, among that dust, stars and planets are forming in the most violent and destructive processes.
ImageSH2-119. The clamshell Nebula by Astro Divers, su Flickr

Alson Wong
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Posts: 85
Joined: Tue Sep 06, 2011 4:14 am

Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by Alson Wong » Sun Oct 29, 2023 4:47 pm

The Veil Nebula
Copyright: Alson Wong
My_Picture.jpg
Portions of the Veil Nebula supernova remnant: NGC 6960 (the "Witch's Broom") at top, and Fleming's Triangular Wisp at lower left.
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Alson Wong
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Posts: 85
Joined: Tue Sep 06, 2011 4:14 am

Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by Alson Wong » Sun Oct 29, 2023 4:49 pm

Portion of the Veil Nebula - NGC 6992 and NGC 6995
Copyright: Alson Wong
My_Picture.jpg
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Alson Wong
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Posts: 85
Joined: Tue Sep 06, 2011 4:14 am

Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by Alson Wong » Sun Oct 29, 2023 4:50 pm

The Flying Bat Nebula and the Squid Nebula
Copyright: Alson Wong
My_Picture.jpg
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salvatorecerruto
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Posts: 21
Joined: Thu Aug 22, 2019 2:28 pm

Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by salvatorecerruto » Sun Oct 29, 2023 7:26 pm

ImagePartial lunar eclipse by Salvatore Cerruto, su Flickr

Last night, I had the privilege of witnessing a partial lunar eclipse, an event always filled with anticipation and fascination. The atmospheric conditions, which are never quite predictable at this time of the year, not only allowed us to observe this beautiful phenomenon but also made the moment even more special by creating a lunar halo that formed right at that moment, as if to highlight the spectacle taking place in the sky. Adding to the beauty of this scene were the presence of Jupiter in conjunction and the open cluster of the Pleiades.

Here is a brief description of the two celestial phenomena I was able to observe last night. The first, the partial lunar eclipse, is a celestial event in which the moon's disc is partially obscured by the shadow cast by the Earth. The second, the lunar halo, is an optical phenomenon that results in the formation of a ring of light around the moon and occurs when moonlight interacts with ice crystals suspended in the atmosphere and is refracted to create the described effect. Lunar halos typically have a diameter of about 22 degrees.

Shooting data: Nikon D800 + Sigma 35mm f/1.4, a blend of two shots

f/7.1, 8 sec., ISO-640
f/7.1, 1/200 sec., ISO-640 (for the detail of the eclipsed moon)

Date: October 28, 2023
Author: Salvatore Cerruto
Location: Modica, Italy

Yead Muhammad Ivan

Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by Yead Muhammad Ivan » Mon Oct 30, 2023 1:28 am


bodon
Asternaut
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Oct 12, 2023 1:12 am

Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by bodon » Mon Oct 30, 2023 1:58 am

Pencil Nebula NGC2736
I captured this image from my back yard in Nowra NSW. This slender and elongated emission nebula resides in the southern constellation Vela. It provides a fascinating glimpse into the aftermath of a supernova explosion, revealing the intricate interplay of cosmic forces in space.
I used an Askar FRA500, ZWO2600MM Pro camera with Antlia Ha and Oiii 3nm filters, exposing 78 frames at 240 seconds each for Ha and 140 frames for Oiii. These were taken over the course of several nights from 25 May to 20 July 23.
I applied a gain of 100 and maintained a temperature of minus 10. The images were processed, involving the stacking of 40 bias and 35 flat frames for each filter. Subsequently, I stretched and coloured the image using the HOO method in PixInsight, resulting in a total of 14.0 hours.
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Tom Glenn
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Posts: 51
Joined: Sat Jan 25, 2020 6:56 pm

Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by Tom Glenn » Mon Oct 30, 2023 5:43 am

Hunter's Moon and ISS
ImageHunter's Moon and ISS by Tom Glenn, on Flickr

I captured this image of the International Space Station in transit across the full Hunter's Moon, approximately 12 hours after the partial lunar eclipse that was visible from some locations. The image is a single exposure of 0.3ms (no compositing or stacking) that was extracted from a video sequence of the event, and shows significant details on the ISS, which is observed over the southern highlands region of the Moon near the prominent rays of the crater Tycho (link to full size image).

Image details:
October 29, 2023
01:55:35am local time (PDT)
San Diego, CA
6" f/6 Newtonian telescope
ASI183mm camera w/610nm pass filter and coma corrector
Single 0.3ms exposure

kentbiggs
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Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Nov 01, 2010 12:52 am

Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by kentbiggs » Mon Oct 30, 2023 10:07 am

NGC 7217 ~ Multi-Ringed Galaxy
URL: https://www.kentbiggs.com/images/galaxies/N7217-2.htm

Exciting new detail in this image showing 5 or more rings including outer star halo, outer blueish ring, middle grey ring, inner blue-grey ring, 2nd inner dark ring, and yellow-white nucleus!

Zoomed in view without stars. Hover over to show stars!
Click to view full size image 1 or image 2
https://www.kentbiggs.com/images/galaxi ... _4Kzns.jpg
https://www.kentbiggs.com/images/galaxi ... GB_4Kz.jpg

Full image. Hover over to see annotations:
Click to view full size image 1 or image 2

No Stars URL: https://www.kentbiggs.com/images/galaxi ... B_4Kns.jpg
Full screen URL: https://www.kentbiggs.com/images/galaxi ... RGB_4K.jpg
Enlargement URL: https://www.kentbiggs.com/images/galaxi ... GB_4Kz.jpg
Integration time: 16 hours. Copyright Kent E. Biggs

Clear skies,
www.kentbiggs.com
Houston, Texas
Last edited by bystander on Tue Oct 31, 2023 4:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Please no hot links to images > 500 kb. Used smaller images.

Wolfgang
Science Officer
Posts: 165
Joined: Mon Oct 04, 2010 4:22 pm

Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by Wolfgang » Mon Oct 30, 2023 1:58 pm

NGC1365
https://www.astrobin.com/j39n4r/
Copyright: Wolfgang Promper
1365rcbn3.jpg
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maxmarchini
Asternaut
Posts: 4
Joined: Sun Oct 08, 2023 2:58 pm

Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by maxmarchini » Mon Oct 30, 2023 4:27 pm

ImageRCW98 - Coffee Bean Nebula in Nor - TL CH1 202305 - DynSHO by Massimo Marchini, su Flickr

Due to the bad weather, for over two months, I decided to subscribe to a remote telescope service; so, I can now process some pictures of objects not visible from my home observatory.
Looking for some interesting objects, I found this uncommon HII region; it’s included only in the RCW Catalogue (Rodgers, Campbell and Whiteoak).

I developed the picture using (for the first time) a Dynamic SHO palette, which uses factors based on pixel values (instead of mean values). The image resulting has more color deepness.

MrRat
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Posts: 41
Joined: Sat Jul 24, 2021 11:37 am

Happy Halloween

Post by MrRat » Mon Oct 30, 2023 8:39 pm

The spooky Ghost of Cassiopeia
IC 63 taken from my backyard in Hartford, AL, USA. 74 shots at 300 seconds each taken with a ZWO ASI2600MC camera, William Optics GT81 telescope, and Losmandy GM811G equatorial mount. The last set of images were taken Oct. 30th, 2023.
231030 SH2-185_Ghost_RTU_74_300-crop-lpc-cbg-csc-St-Edit.jpg
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Juan_Chanclas
Asternaut
Posts: 2
Joined: Tue Oct 31, 2023 3:43 am

Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by Juan_Chanclas » Tue Oct 31, 2023 3:55 am

Ring of Fire - Annular Eclipse October 2023

High resolution: https://www.astrobin.com/9vmah5/

Copyright: Juan_Chanclas
I went to Chetumal in Quintana Roo, Mexico and I captured this image of the eclipse . It was my first solar Eclipse that I captured! I hope you enjoy it !!

Astrodude13
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Posts: 37
Joined: Sun Jan 19, 2014 11:44 pm

Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by Astrodude13 » Tue Oct 31, 2023 6:00 am

ImagePtolemy's Cluster - M7 by Blake Estes, on Flickr

This image consists 36 x 600 second exposures
A collaboration between Christian Sasse and I.

Camera: ZWO ASI 6200MC Pro
Telescope: TEC 160
Filter: Optolong L-Pro
Mount: Paramount ME
Location: Chile

SparkyHT
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Posts: 12
Joined: Mon Sep 27, 2021 11:37 pm

Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by SparkyHT » Tue Oct 31, 2023 11:28 pm

Flying Bat and Squid nebulae (Sh2-129/OU4) 88h 10m over 20 nights. SpaceCat51/ASI2600MMC. Processing in Pixinsight.

This has got to be one of the toughest images I've processed. Despite having 54 hours of OIII, a lot of work had to be done to bring out OU4. The stars are RGB and were added to replace the HOO stars for a much more natural look.
Full res image and info:https://astrob.in/azflsd/0/

Equipment:
Imaging Telescopes Or Lenses: William Optics SpaceCat 51
Imaging Cameras: ZWO ASI2600MM Pro
Mounts: Astro-Physics Mach2 GTO
Filters:
Chroma Blue 31 mm · Chroma Green 31 mm · Chroma H-alpha 3nm Bandpass 31 mm · Chroma OIII 3nm Bandpass 31 mm · Chroma Red 31 mm
Software:
Open PHD Guiding Project PHD2 · Pleiades Astrophoto PixInsight · Russell Croman Astrophotography BlurXTerminator · Russell Croman Astrophotography NoiseXTerminator · Russell Croman Astrophotography StarXTerminator · Starkeeper Voyager

Acquisition details:
Dates:
July 9, 2023 · July 10, 2023 · July 17, 2023 · July 18, 2023 · July 30, 2023 · Aug. 8, 2023 · Aug. 12, 2023 · Aug. 15, 2023 · Aug. 16, 2023 · Aug. 17, 2023 · Aug. 19, 2023 · Aug. 22, 2023 · Aug. 23, 2023 · Aug. 26, 2023 · Aug. 27, 2023 · Aug. 29, 2023 · Aug. 30, 2023 · Aug. 31, 2023 · Sept. 1, 2023 · Sept. 3, 2023

Frames:
Chroma Blue 31 mm: 60×180″(3h)
Chroma Green 31 mm: 60×180″(3h)
Chroma H-alpha 3nm Bandpass 31 mm: 297×300″(24h 45′)
Chroma OIII 3nm Bandpass 31 mm: 653×300″(54h 25′)
Chroma Red 31 mm: 60×180″(3h)

Integration: 88h 10′
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Groovynight
Asternaut
Posts: 7
Joined: Thu Oct 12, 2023 7:47 pm

Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by Groovynight » Thu Nov 02, 2023 2:45 pm

VdB 14, VdB 15, Sh2-202 & Stock 23 in Camelopardalis (Widefield)

VdB 14 & 15 are a really nice pair of reflection nebulae in Camelopardalis, though containing a little bit of emission components, too. In this 400mm widefield I was able to capture the large nebula Sh2-202 and the open cluster Stock 23 as well. To bring out the emission parts, I added some H-alpha data to the RGB picture. Nevertheless, all objects are very faint, and so I invested a total of 13 hours at f/2 to gather enough data for processing. Hope you like it!

Image
(Thumb only)

>>>High Resolution: http://astrophoto-hannover.de/downloads ... s_Horn.jpg

Equipment & Capture Info:

Celestron RASA 8 f/2
Celestron Motorfocuser
EQ6-R Pro
ZWO ASI 2600 MC Pro (Gain 100, Offset 18, -10°)
RGB: 300 × 30″ (2h 30′)
RGB (IDAS LPS-D3 Filter): 260 × 120″ (8h 40′)
TS 2600 MP Mono (Gain 100, Offset 50, -10°)
Ha: (Baader H-alpha Highspeed Ultra-Narrowband 3.5nm Filter): 130 x 60 (2h 10')
Total: 13 h 20'
Flats, Darkflats, Dithering
N.I.N.A., Guiding: ZWO ASI 120MM und PHD2
Astropixelprocessor, Photoshop, Pixinsight

Date: November 23, December 8 & 15, 2022 / New edit November 2023

Location: Hannover, Germany (Bortle 5-6)

Contact:
Website: www.astrophoto-hannover.de
Instagram: @astrophoto_hannover
Astrobin: https://www.astrobin.com/users/Groovynight/
E-Mail: info@astrophoto-hannover.de

salvatorecerruto
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Posts: 21
Joined: Thu Aug 22, 2019 2:28 pm

Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by salvatorecerruto » Thu Nov 02, 2023 5:24 pm

ImagePartial lunar eclipse by Salvatore Cerruto, su Flickr

The partial lunar eclipse of October 28th and the conjunction between the moon and Jupiter. The main Jovian satellites can be clearly distinguished: Io, Callisto, Europa and Ganymede.

Technical data: Nikon D800 + Tamron 100-400mm, merge of 3 shots @230mm, f/5.6, taken by the same position and at the same time (few seconds interval between shots)

Date: October 28, 2023
Author: Salvatore Cerruto
Location: Modica, Italy

Xeebok
Asternaut
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Nov 03, 2023 9:41 am

Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by Xeebok » Fri Nov 03, 2023 9:57 am

Sh2-114 - The Flying Dragon
https://www.astrobin.com/wlm6w9/B/
credits: Ahmed Wegdan & Mark Ellis


The image is a combination of 2 data sets 31h and 36 mins in July 2023 and 18 hours in October 2021 a total of 49.5 hours

Location: Chandler, Arizona, United State By Mark Ellis

Imaging Telescopes: Planewave CDK14 + Planewave Reducer 0.66x CDK12.5-14-17
Imaging Cameras: QHYCCD QHY600PH M SBFL (Short back-focal length)
Mounts: Planewave L-350
Filters:
Chroma Lum 50 mm
Chroma Red 50 mm
Chroma Green 50 mm
Chroma Blue 50 mm
Chroma H-alpha 3nm Bandpass 50 mm
Chroma SII 3nm Bandpass 50 mm

Image Acquisition: Mark Ellis
Processing: Ahmed Wegdan

Image

astrosama
Ensign
Posts: 53
Joined: Thu Dec 17, 2020 9:51 pm

Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by astrosama » Fri Nov 03, 2023 6:13 pm

Jupiter at the Opposition and Closest approach above the Pyramids of Giza


Following a fantastic night spent within the Great Pyramid complex, we captured this breathtaking image for Jupiter's closest approach to Earth.

The ancient Egyptians known Jupiter and called it " Horus who illuminates the two lands "


ImageJupiter Closest approach above the Pyramids of Giza by osama Fathi, on Flickr

Location: Giza, Egypt

ImageJupiter Closest approach above the Pyramids of Giza-annotated by osama Fathi, on Flickr

Gears:
Nikon z6 , Nikkor 14-24

Settings :
Single shot 2sec , Iso 125, f3.2
another shot added to enhance HDR, 1/8 sec ، iso 1000

Softwares :
Adobe Photoshop


Credit :
Osama Fathi :
https://www.instagram.com/osama.fathi.nswatcher85/
https://www.facebook.com/NSWatcher/

Cairo, Egypt

1lostone
Asternaut
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Jun 07, 2021 7:24 am

Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by 1lostone » Sat Nov 04, 2023 9:11 am

Horsehead Nebula in SHH
Image

The Iconic Horsehead Nebula with a twist. This consits of 12hrs of data. I decided I wanted something diffrent from the normal Horsehead.
I took 10hrs of Ha and 2 hrs of Sii and did a combination of SHH. This is the results of that combination
Image taken with my CDK14 from my B-8 back yard. Processed it using Pixinsight.
I like how this came out and to be honest it's the best Horsehead I've done.

Planewave CDK 14
Planewave L-350 Mount
QHY 268M Pro
Chroma 50mm Filters

Hope you enjoy it.

bluvega
Asternaut
Posts: 3
Joined: Thu Oct 17, 2019 8:52 am

Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by bluvega » Sat Nov 04, 2023 12:20 pm

The Cocoon nebula (IC 5146)

Telescope: Vixen AX103S
Camere: ZWO ASI ASI 294 PRO
Mount: iOptron iEQ45-pro
Software: Pleiades Astrophoto S.L. PixInsight V1.8 , PHD2 Guiding PHD 2.6.2
Light: 102x300" (gain: 200.00) -5°C bin 1x1
Location: Santa Cesarea Terme (Italy)
Sky bortle 4/5


The Cocoon nebula
https://www.flickr.com/photos/bluvega/
Copyright: Salvatore Cozza
ImageCocoon Nebula (IC 5146) by Salvatore Cozza, su Flickr

MrRat
Ensign
Posts: 41
Joined: Sat Jul 24, 2021 11:37 am

Sol

Post by MrRat » Sat Nov 04, 2023 7:09 pm

Birth Of A Phoenix

We enter a new age where the bounds of observation and photography are opening to everyone at the push of a button in a phone app. The barriers of cost and skill are being removed to provide learning and enjoyment to a much wider audience.

A single shot capture of a Turkey Vulture in front of the Sun using the ZWO SeeStar50 smart telescope sitting on top of my car in Hartford, AL, USA on Nov. 4th, 2023
Birth Of A Phoenix.jpg
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Astroben
Asternaut
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Oct 26, 2020 8:05 am

49H MOSAIC ON VEIL NEBULA IN HOO / RGB STARS

Post by Astroben » Sun Nov 05, 2023 5:46 pm

Hello

I would like to submit my last Picture.
This is a 49H , 2 panel Mosaic, on the Veil Nebula.
This image is the result of a desire to reveal the maximum level of detail in the Cygnus Veil Nebula using a purely amateur instrument.
It is comprised of a total of 49 hours of exposure time, spread across 2 mosaics, including approximately 13 hours and 30 minutes in Hydrogen-Alpha, 9 hours in Oxygen-III, and a bit more than 2 hours of RGB data for the stars, all of this on each panel.
The image captures were taken over a period of 3 weeks because I aimed to prioritize only those nights when the target was at an altitude of more than 60/70 degrees, in order to obtain the cleanest possible signal.
The equipment used is within the realm of amateur astronomy, consisting of an FRA400 telescope equipped with an ASI 2600MM, all mounted on a ZWO AM5. This is a mobile setup ,no fixed observatory, and it was all captured under the French Picardie sky, teaching you the value of patience...

Ha: 404*240s
OIII: 263*240s
Red:145*40s
Green:148*40s
Blue:151*40s
( 1111 pictures Total )

Processing was done only with Pixinsight, and Photoshop for final editing

Clear Skies to all !

Image

Rafeee
Ensign
Posts: 49
Joined: Fri Feb 24, 2012 8:52 pm
Location: Hungary, Zselic Starry Sky Park

Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by Rafeee » Sun Nov 05, 2023 7:04 pm

Once in a Decade
2023_11_05_134102_2_2048px.jpg
Copyright: Rafael Schmall
https://www.astrobin.com/users/Rafeee/

Perhaps the most spectacular and strongest Aurora Borealis of the last 20 years that could be observed from Hungary. It regularly cast shadows and you could see the colors.

Image Details:
Equipment: Canon EOS6D, Canon 50mm f/1.4, SkyWatcher Star-Adventurer
Exif data: 5sec, ISO3200, 50mm
Processing: Photoshop

Location: Hungary, Somogy, Kaposfo
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Julien Looten
Ensign
Posts: 36
Joined: Tue Mar 08, 2022 7:08 pm

Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by Julien Looten » Sun Nov 05, 2023 11:21 pm

SAR Arc in France
https://www.flickr.com/photos/julienlooten/
Copyright: Looten Julien

Image

Solar activity over the last few days has led to the emergence of spectacular aurora borealis that can be seen this evening and tonight in France. There was an impressive peak of auroras at around 6.15 this evening, but unfortunately the clouds prevented me from photographing them...

However, despite a few rain showers, I finally managed to capture a vast panorama (180°, from west to east), allowing me to capture a red auroral arc, known as the SAR (Stable Auroral Red) arc. This is surmounted by the arch of the Milky Way.

The SAR arc is a band of reddish light observable in the sky. It is a rare phenomenon at these latitudes (50.2°). Unlike traditional (polar) aurorae, which display a variety of colours and dynamic patterns, SAR arcs display a fixed colour and remain motionless. This one was visible almost at zenith in the sky. Although geomagnetic activity due to an eruption of charged particles from the Sun triggers both aurorae and SAR arcs, their formation mechanisms differ slightly...

While auroras are created when energetic particles collide with atoms in the atmosphere, SAR arcs are generated by the enormous thermal and kinetic energy of the Earth's atmosphere (around 3000°C).

SAR arcs form at an altitude of around 400 km, well above the classic aurora borealis located between 90 and 150 km. SAR arcs occur during geomagnetic storms, as was the case when the KP index was around 7 at around 7.50pm this evening.

Equipment used 📸: Canon 6D Astrodon (scrolled) - Sigma 28mm F1.4 - 33 shots to form the panorama - Individual exposure of 6 seconds