APOD: The Cone Nebula from Hubble (2024 Feb 04)

Comments and questions about the APOD on the main view screen.
User avatar
APOD Robot
Otto Posterman
Posts: 5364
Joined: Fri Dec 04, 2009 3:27 am

APOD: The Cone Nebula from Hubble (2024 Feb 04)

Post by APOD Robot » Sun Feb 04, 2024 5:05 am

Image The Cone Nebula from Hubble

Explanation: Stars are forming in the gigantic dust pillar called the Cone Nebula. Cones, pillars, and majestic flowing shapes abound in stellar nurseries where natal clouds of gas and dust are buffeted by energetic winds from newborn stars. The Cone Nebula, a well-known example, lies within the bright galactic star-forming region NGC 2264. The Cone was captured in unprecedented detail in this close-up composite of several observations from the Earth-orbiting Hubble Space Telescope. While the Cone Nebula, about 2,500 light-years away in Monoceros, is around 7 light-years long, the region pictured here surrounding the cone's blunted head is a mere 2.5 light-years across. In our neck of the galaxy that distance is just over half way from our Sun to its nearest stellar neighbors in the Alpha Centauri star system. The massive star NGC 2264 IRS, seen by Hubble's infrared camera in 1997, is the likely source of the wind sculpting the Cone Nebula and lies off the top of the image. The Cone Nebula's reddish veil is produced by dust and glowing hydrogen gas.

<< Previous APOD This Day in APOD Next APOD >>

User avatar
Ann
4725 Å
Posts: 13410
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 5:33 am

Re: APOD: The Cone Nebula from Hubble (2024 Feb 04)

Post by Ann » Sun Feb 04, 2024 5:30 am


Han Solo: Buddy, you've got stars in your hair.

Chewbacca: Grunt! (Translation: And who knows how many other critters I've got up there?)

Ann
Color Commentator

Christian G.
Science Officer
Posts: 129
Joined: Sat Apr 08, 2023 10:37 pm

Re: APOD: The Cone Nebula from Hubble (2024 Feb 04)

Post by Christian G. » Sun Feb 04, 2024 5:12 pm

Otherworldly!

User avatar
johnnydeep
Commodore
Posts: 2831
Joined: Sun Feb 20, 2011 8:57 pm

Re: APOD: The Cone Nebula from Hubble (2024 Feb 04)

Post by johnnydeep » Sun Feb 04, 2024 5:16 pm

Of the many stars seen in this image, are any actually within the Cone Nebula, or has no stellar conception started there yet?
--
"To B̬̻̋̚o̞̮̚̚l̘̲̀᷾d̫͓᷅ͩḷ̯᷁ͮȳ͙᷊͠ Go......Beyond The F͇̤i̙̖e̤̟l̡͓d͈̹s̙͚ We Know."{ʲₒʰₙNYᵈₑᵉₚ}

User avatar
Ann
4725 Å
Posts: 13410
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 5:33 am

Re: APOD: The Cone Nebula from Hubble (2024 Feb 04)

Post by Ann » Sun Feb 04, 2024 6:12 pm

johnnydeep wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 5:16 pm Of the many stars seen in this image, are any actually within the Cone Nebula, or has no stellar conception started there yet?

The way I understand it, we do see two newborn stars at the top of the Cone Nebula:

APOD 4 February 2024 annotated.png

Stars are often seen at the top of dusty pillars. The Horsehead Nebula, which is another pillar, appears to have given birth to a star at the top of its "head":


And the three famous Pillars of Creation appear to each carry a star at the top of its head:


The Dark Tower in Scorpius, another pillar, seems to be blowing a bubble as it is "spitting out" a new star. The Dark Tower is also wearing a "necklace" of blue stars around its "neck". Since there appear to be no other blue stars in the vicinity, we may perhaps conclude that the blue stars have been birthed by the Dark Tower itself.

Dark Tower in Scorpius Rick Stevenson.png
The Dark Tower in Scorpius. Credit: Rick Stevenson.

I guess it is also possible that some of the other stars that can be seen next to the Cone, the Horsehead and the Pillars of Creation may have been born from these dusty pillars and then drifted away. We must also remember that pillars shrink over time as ultraviolet light and harsh stellar winds from hot massive stars eat away at them. That makes it perhaps even more likely that one or more of the stars that are detached from the outline of the pillars have nevertheless been born inside the pillars, when they were larger.

Ann
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Color Commentator

User avatar
Chris Peterson
Abominable Snowman
Posts: 18167
Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2007 11:13 pm
Location: Guffey, Colorado, USA

Re: APOD: The Cone Nebula from Hubble (2024 Feb 04)

Post by Chris Peterson » Sun Feb 04, 2024 6:41 pm

johnnydeep wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 5:16 pm Of the many stars seen in this image, are any actually within the Cone Nebula, or has no stellar conception started there yet?
It's really hard to say. There are a few stars (identified by Ann) that are ambiguous. I'm quite sure that in a molecular cloud this dense there is star formation going on. But we don't usually see that in visible wavelengths until they are outside the edge of the cloud, usually at the tip of a proplyd. There are little bumps on the surface of this cloud that might well be proplyds beginning to form. The absence of obvious ones suggests that this cloud is somewhat younger than others, like the Pillars of Creation. I'll bet that a JWST image of this would show stars forming inside.
Chris

*****************************************
Chris L Peterson
Cloudbait Observatory
https://www.cloudbait.com

User avatar
johnnydeep
Commodore
Posts: 2831
Joined: Sun Feb 20, 2011 8:57 pm

Re: APOD: The Cone Nebula from Hubble (2024 Feb 04)

Post by johnnydeep » Sun Feb 04, 2024 7:18 pm

Chris Peterson wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 6:41 pm
johnnydeep wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 5:16 pm Of the many stars seen in this image, are any actually within the Cone Nebula, or has no stellar conception started there yet?
It's really hard to say. There are a few stars (identified by Ann) that are ambiguous. I'm quite sure that in a molecular cloud this dense there is star formation going on. But we don't usually see that in visible wavelengths until they are outside the edge of the cloud, usually at the tip of a proplyd. There are little bumps on the surface of this cloud that might well be proplyds beginning to form. The absence of obvious ones suggests that this cloud is somewhat younger than others, like the Pillars of Creation. I'll bet that a JWST image of this would show stars forming inside.
Thanks Chris (and Ann). I'd think any stars that actually formed from the dust would have blown the dust clear already, but that doesn't seem to have been the case here. I wonder what the Gaia measurements of the distances of the suspected neonate stars are.

PS - "proplyd": another cool word to add to my vocabulary!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proplyd wrote:A proplyd, short for ionized protoplanetary disk, is an externally illuminated photoevaporating protoplanetary disk around a young star. Nearly 180 proplyds have been discovered in the Orion Nebula.[1] Images of proplyds in other star-forming regions are rare, while Orion is the only region with a large known sample due to its relative proximity to Earth.[2]
--
"To B̬̻̋̚o̞̮̚̚l̘̲̀᷾d̫͓᷅ͩḷ̯᷁ͮȳ͙᷊͠ Go......Beyond The F͇̤i̙̖e̤̟l̡͓d͈̹s̙͚ We Know."{ʲₒʰₙNYᵈₑᵉₚ}

User avatar
Ann
4725 Å
Posts: 13410
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 5:33 am

Re: APOD: The Cone Nebula from Hubble (2024 Feb 04)

Post by Ann » Sun Feb 04, 2024 8:28 pm

johnnydeep wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 7:18 pm
Chris Peterson wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 6:41 pm
johnnydeep wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 5:16 pm Of the many stars seen in this image, are any actually within the Cone Nebula, or has no stellar conception started there yet?
It's really hard to say. There are a few stars (identified by Ann) that are ambiguous. I'm quite sure that in a molecular cloud this dense there is star formation going on. But we don't usually see that in visible wavelengths until they are outside the edge of the cloud, usually at the tip of a proplyd. There are little bumps on the surface of this cloud that might well be proplyds beginning to form. The absence of obvious ones suggests that this cloud is somewhat younger than others, like the Pillars of Creation. I'll bet that a JWST image of this would show stars forming inside.
Thanks Chris (and Ann). I'd think any stars that actually formed from the dust would have blown the dust clear already, but that doesn't seem to have been the case here. I wonder what the Gaia measurements of the distances of the suspected neonate stars are.

PS - "proplyd": another cool word to add to my vocabulary!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proplyd wrote:A proplyd, short for ionized protoplanetary disk, is an externally illuminated photoevaporating protoplanetary disk around a young star. Nearly 180 proplyds have been discovered in the Orion Nebula.[1] Images of proplyds in other star-forming regions are rare, while Orion is the only region with a large known sample due to its relative proximity to Earth.[2]
Despite what I said about blue (and therefore reasonably massive) stars possibly having formed from the Dark Tower in Scorpius, I believe that typically only low-mass stars will form from pillars, because there usually isn't enough starforming material there for massive stars to form. (There may be exceptions.)

Still, take a look at the star that I think is called Herschel 36 (too lazy to look it up) forming at the center of the Lagoon Nebula. The sound and fury of the birth of that massive star has sure stirred up the center of the Lagoon!


You don't see that kind of violence when small stars form in pillars like the Cone Nebula, do you?

Ann
Color Commentator

User avatar
johnnydeep
Commodore
Posts: 2831
Joined: Sun Feb 20, 2011 8:57 pm

Re: APOD: The Cone Nebula from Hubble (2024 Feb 04)

Post by johnnydeep » Sun Feb 04, 2024 8:49 pm

Ann wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 8:28 pm
johnnydeep wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 7:18 pm
Chris Peterson wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 6:41 pm

It's really hard to say. There are a few stars (identified by Ann) that are ambiguous. I'm quite sure that in a molecular cloud this dense there is star formation going on. But we don't usually see that in visible wavelengths until they are outside the edge of the cloud, usually at the tip of a proplyd. There are little bumps on the surface of this cloud that might well be proplyds beginning to form. The absence of obvious ones suggests that this cloud is somewhat younger than others, like the Pillars of Creation. I'll bet that a JWST image of this would show stars forming inside.
Thanks Chris (and Ann). I'd think any stars that actually formed from the dust would have blown the dust clear already, but that doesn't seem to have been the case here. I wonder what the Gaia measurements of the distances of the suspected neonate stars are.

PS - "proplyd": another cool word to add to my vocabulary!
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proplyd wrote:A proplyd, short for ionized protoplanetary disk, is an externally illuminated photoevaporating protoplanetary disk around a young star. Nearly 180 proplyds have been discovered in the Orion Nebula.[1] Images of proplyds in other star-forming regions are rare, while Orion is the only region with a large known sample due to its relative proximity to Earth.[2]
Despite what I said about blue (and therefore reasonably massive) stars possibly having formed from the Dark Tower in Scorpius, I believe that typically only low-mass stars will form from pillars, because there usually isn't enough starforming material there for massive stars to form. (There may be exceptions.)

Still, take a look at the star that I think is called Herschel 36 (too lazy to look it up) forming at the center of the Lagoon Nebula. The sound and fury of the birth of that massive star has sure stirred up the center of the Lagoon!


You don't see that kind of violence when small stars form in pillars like the Cone Nebula, do you?

Ann
So, are you saying that low mass stars wouldn't blow away much of their surrounding embryonic dust?
--
"To B̬̻̋̚o̞̮̚̚l̘̲̀᷾d̫͓᷅ͩḷ̯᷁ͮȳ͙᷊͠ Go......Beyond The F͇̤i̙̖e̤̟l̡͓d͈̹s̙͚ We Know."{ʲₒʰₙNYᵈₑᵉₚ}

User avatar
Ann
4725 Å
Posts: 13410
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 5:33 am

Re: APOD: The Cone Nebula from Hubble (2024 Feb 04)

Post by Ann » Sun Feb 04, 2024 8:58 pm

johnnydeep wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 8:49 pm
Ann wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 8:28 pm
johnnydeep wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 7:18 pm

Thanks Chris (and Ann). I'd think any stars that actually formed from the dust would have blown the dust clear already, but that doesn't seem to have been the case here. I wonder what the Gaia measurements of the distances of the suspected neonate stars are.

PS - "proplyd": another cool word to add to my vocabulary!

Despite what I said about blue (and therefore reasonably massive) stars possibly having formed from the Dark Tower in Scorpius, I believe that typically only low-mass stars will form from pillars, because there usually isn't enough starforming material there for massive stars to form. (There may be exceptions.)

Still, take a look at the star that I think is called Herschel 36 (too lazy to look it up) forming at the center of the Lagoon Nebula. The sound and fury of the birth of that massive star has sure stirred up the center of the Lagoon!


You don't see that kind of violence when small stars form in pillars like the Cone Nebula, do you?

Ann
So, are you saying that low mass stars wouldn't blow away much of their surrounding embryonic dust?

Not as much of it as a massive star would, no.

Ann
Color Commentator

User avatar
johnnydeep
Commodore
Posts: 2831
Joined: Sun Feb 20, 2011 8:57 pm

Re: APOD: The Cone Nebula from Hubble (2024 Feb 04)

Post by johnnydeep » Sun Feb 04, 2024 9:03 pm

Ann wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 8:58 pm
johnnydeep wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 8:49 pm
Ann wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 8:28 pm

Despite what I said about blue (and therefore reasonably massive) stars possibly having formed from the Dark Tower in Scorpius, I believe that typically only low-mass stars will form from pillars, because there usually isn't enough starforming material there for massive stars to form. (There may be exceptions.)

Still, take a look at the star that I think is called Herschel 36 (too lazy to look it up) forming at the center of the Lagoon Nebula. The sound and fury of the birth of that massive star has sure stirred up the center of the Lagoon!


You don't see that kind of violence when small stars form in pillars like the Cone Nebula, do you?

Ann
So, are you saying that low mass stars wouldn't blow away much of their surrounding embryonic dust?

Not as much of it as a massive star would, no.

Ann
Frankly, though, I see no signs of any of these supposedly infant stars blowing any of their surrounding dust away.
--
"To B̬̻̋̚o̞̮̚̚l̘̲̀᷾d̫͓᷅ͩḷ̯᷁ͮȳ͙᷊͠ Go......Beyond The F͇̤i̙̖e̤̟l̡͓d͈̹s̙͚ We Know."{ʲₒʰₙNYᵈₑᵉₚ}

User avatar
Chris Peterson
Abominable Snowman
Posts: 18167
Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2007 11:13 pm
Location: Guffey, Colorado, USA

Re: APOD: The Cone Nebula from Hubble (2024 Feb 04)

Post by Chris Peterson » Sun Feb 04, 2024 9:55 pm

johnnydeep wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 9:03 pm
Ann wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 8:58 pm
johnnydeep wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 8:49 pm

So, are you saying that low mass stars wouldn't blow away much of their surrounding embryonic dust?

Not as much of it as a massive star would, no.

Ann
Frankly, though, I see no signs of any of these supposedly infant stars blowing any of their surrounding dust away.
I don't think that's quite what happens. They blow away little bubbles around themselves deep in the cloud, but they are exposed as winds from hot stars outside the molecular cloud erode away the cloud wall.

Here's M16 and the Cone next to each other, normalized to their actual relative sizes (M16 is 2.5 times further away than the Cone). Similarly sized structures, but it looks like M16 has been chipped away at for quite a bit longer.
_
cone_eagle.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Chris

*****************************************
Chris L Peterson
Cloudbait Observatory
https://www.cloudbait.com

User avatar
johnnydeep
Commodore
Posts: 2831
Joined: Sun Feb 20, 2011 8:57 pm

Re: APOD: The Cone Nebula from Hubble (2024 Feb 04)

Post by johnnydeep » Sun Feb 04, 2024 11:08 pm

Chris Peterson wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 9:55 pm
johnnydeep wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 9:03 pm
Ann wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 8:58 pm


Not as much of it as a massive star would, no.

Ann
Frankly, though, I see no signs of any of these supposedly infant stars blowing any of their surrounding dust away.
I don't think that's quite what happens. They blow away little bubbles around themselves deep in the cloud, but they are exposed as winds from hot stars outside the molecular cloud erode away the cloud wall.

Here's M16 and the Cone next to each other, normalized to their actual relative sizes (M16 is 2.5 times further away than the Cone). Similarly sized structures, but it looks like M16 has been chipped away at for quite a bit longer.
_
cone_eagle.jpg
I see. So the sculpting of the clouds doesn't stem from any stars they might be incubating, but from extrinsic stars. Very interesting.
--
"To B̬̻̋̚o̞̮̚̚l̘̲̀᷾d̫͓᷅ͩḷ̯᷁ͮȳ͙᷊͠ Go......Beyond The F͇̤i̙̖e̤̟l̡͓d͈̹s̙͚ We Know."{ʲₒʰₙNYᵈₑᵉₚ}

User avatar
Ann
4725 Å
Posts: 13410
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 5:33 am

Re: APOD: The Cone Nebula from Hubble (2024 Feb 04)

Post by Ann » Mon Feb 05, 2024 5:08 am

johnnydeep wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 11:08 pm
Chris Peterson wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 9:55 pm
johnnydeep wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 9:03 pm

Frankly, though, I see no signs of any of these supposedly infant stars blowing any of their surrounding dust away.
I don't think that's quite what happens. They blow away little bubbles around themselves deep in the cloud, but they are exposed as winds from hot stars outside the molecular cloud erode away the cloud wall.

Here's M16 and the Cone next to each other, normalized to their actual relative sizes (M16 is 2.5 times further away than the Cone). Similarly sized structures, but it looks like M16 has been chipped away at for quite a bit longer.
_
cone_eagle.jpg
I see. So the sculpting of the clouds doesn't stem from any stars they might be incubating, but from extrinsic stars. Very interesting.

Pillars can be sculpted by the stars that they are giving birth to. Take a look at the tallest pillar in the Mystic Mountain in Carina:


You can see that the tallest pillar appears to be precessing like a top, because the young star being formed at the top of it and emitting double jets. Look at how thin the "neck" of this pillar is. It will probably soon be eroded away.

Also note another jet from another young star inside another pillar.

But also note how the entire large structure seems to be eroding away. The small stars inside the pillars aren't responsible for that. Take a look at this Hubble picture of the central Carina Nebula:


I'm not annotating this image, but you should have no problems finding the Mystic Mountain. It is the bright vaguely V-shaped structure at upper right. The tall pillar that you just saw "standing up" is "hanging down" in this picture. You can just make out the jets emerging from it.

Note the bright stars some distance below and to the left of the Mystic Mountain. This is the Trumpler 14 cluster, and it contains some of the hottest and brightest star in the entire Milky Way.


It is Trumpler 14 that is really sculpting and eating away at the Mystic Mountain.

Similarly, the Dark Tower in Scorpius is being sculpted and eroded by the massive cluster NGC 6231:

Dark Tower in Scorpius and NGC 6231 by Gerald Rhemann.png
The Dark Tower in Scorpius is being sculpted by massive cluster NGC 6231.
Credit: Gerald Rhemann.

Ann
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Color Commentator

User avatar
johnnydeep
Commodore
Posts: 2831
Joined: Sun Feb 20, 2011 8:57 pm

Re: APOD: The Cone Nebula from Hubble (2024 Feb 04)

Post by johnnydeep » Mon Feb 05, 2024 5:57 pm

Ann wrote: Mon Feb 05, 2024 5:08 am
johnnydeep wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 11:08 pm
Chris Peterson wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 9:55 pm

I don't think that's quite what happens. They blow away little bubbles around themselves deep in the cloud, but they are exposed as winds from hot stars outside the molecular cloud erode away the cloud wall.

Here's M16 and the Cone next to each other, normalized to their actual relative sizes (M16 is 2.5 times further away than the Cone). Similarly sized structures, but it looks like M16 has been chipped away at for quite a bit longer.
_
cone_eagle.jpg
I see. So the sculpting of the clouds doesn't stem from any stars they might be incubating, but from extrinsic stars. Very interesting.

Pillars can be sculpted by the stars that they are giving birth to. Take a look at the tallest pillar in the Mystic Mountain in Carina:


You can see that the tallest pillar appears to be precessing like a top, because the young star being formed at the top of it and emitting double jets. Look at how thin the "neck" of this pillar is. It will probably soon be eroded away.

Also note another jet from another young star inside another pillar.

But also note how the entire large structure seems to be eroding away. The small stars inside the pillars aren't responsible for that. Take a look at this Hubble picture of the central Carina Nebula:


I'm not annotating this image, but you should have no problems finding the Mystic Mountain. It is the bright vaguely V-shaped structure at upper right. The tall pillar that you just saw "standing up" is "hanging down" in this picture. You can just make out the jets emerging from it.

Note the bright stars some distance below and to the left of the Mystic Mountain. This is the Trumpler 14 cluster, and it contains some of the hottest and brightest star in the entire Milky Way.


It is Trumpler 14 that is really sculpting and eating away at the Mystic Mountain.

Similarly, the Dark Tower in Scorpius is being sculpted and eroded by the massive cluster NGC 6231:

Dark Tower in Scorpius and NGC 6231 by Gerald Rhemann.png
The Dark Tower in Scorpius is being sculpted by massive cluster NGC 6231.
Credit: Gerald Rhemann.

Ann
Thanks, Ann. But I'm still not too convinced by any of these "sculpting" arguments. But I'm sure that's only because I'm not versed in the dynamics involved.

Also, what the heck is that coal-black globule in your Trumpler 14 image?

odd black globule in trumpler 14.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
--
"To B̬̻̋̚o̞̮̚̚l̘̲̀᷾d̫͓᷅ͩḷ̯᷁ͮȳ͙᷊͠ Go......Beyond The F͇̤i̙̖e̤̟l̡͓d͈̹s̙͚ We Know."{ʲₒʰₙNYᵈₑᵉₚ}

User avatar
Ann
4725 Å
Posts: 13410
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 5:33 am

Re: APOD: The Cone Nebula from Hubble (2024 Feb 04)

Post by Ann » Mon Feb 05, 2024 6:06 pm

johnnydeep wrote: Mon Feb 05, 2024 5:57 pm
Ann wrote: Mon Feb 05, 2024 5:08 am
johnnydeep wrote: Sun Feb 04, 2024 11:08 pm

I see. So the sculpting of the clouds doesn't stem from any stars they might be incubating, but from extrinsic stars. Very interesting.

Pillars can be sculpted by the stars that they are giving birth to. Take a look at the tallest pillar in the Mystic Mountain in Carina:


You can see that the tallest pillar appears to be precessing like a top, because the young star being formed at the top of it and emitting double jets. Look at how thin the "neck" of this pillar is. It will probably soon be eroded away.

Also note another jet from another young star inside another pillar.

But also note how the entire large structure seems to be eroding away. The small stars inside the pillars aren't responsible for that. Take a look at this Hubble picture of the central Carina Nebula:


I'm not annotating this image, but you should have no problems finding the Mystic Mountain. It is the bright vaguely V-shaped structure at upper right. The tall pillar that you just saw "standing up" is "hanging down" in this picture. You can just make out the jets emerging from it.

Note the bright stars some distance below and to the left of the Mystic Mountain. This is the Trumpler 14 cluster, and it contains some of the hottest and brightest star in the entire Milky Way.


It is Trumpler 14 that is really sculpting and eating away at the Mystic Mountain.

Similarly, the Dark Tower in Scorpius is being sculpted and eroded by the massive cluster NGC 6231:

Dark Tower in Scorpius and NGC 6231 by Gerald Rhemann.png
The Dark Tower in Scorpius is being sculpted by massive cluster NGC 6231.
Credit: Gerald Rhemann.

Ann
Thanks, Ann. But I'm still not too convinced by any of these "sculpting" arguments. But I'm sure that's only because I'm not versed in the dynamics involved.

Also, what the heck is that coal-black globule in your Trumpler 14 image?


odd black globule in trumpler 14.jpg
It's a Bok globule. :ssmile:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bok_globule

Ann
Color Commentator

User avatar
johnnydeep
Commodore
Posts: 2831
Joined: Sun Feb 20, 2011 8:57 pm

Re: APOD: The Cone Nebula from Hubble (2024 Feb 04)

Post by johnnydeep » Mon Feb 05, 2024 6:12 pm

Ann wrote: Mon Feb 05, 2024 6:06 pm
johnnydeep wrote: Mon Feb 05, 2024 5:57 pm
Ann wrote: Mon Feb 05, 2024 5:08 am
...

Ann
Thanks, Ann. But I'm still not too convinced by any of these "sculpting" arguments. But I'm sure that's only because I'm not versed in the dynamics involved.

Also, what the heck is that coal-black globule in your Trumpler 14 image?

It's a Bok globule. :ssmile:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bok_globule

Ann
But it looks so particularly black, sharp-edged and impenetrable. Perfect place for an advanced civilization to conceal their attack fleet. 😊😊
--
"To B̬̻̋̚o̞̮̚̚l̘̲̀᷾d̫͓᷅ͩḷ̯᷁ͮȳ͙᷊͠ Go......Beyond The F͇̤i̙̖e̤̟l̡͓d͈̹s̙͚ We Know."{ʲₒʰₙNYᵈₑᵉₚ}

User avatar
Ann
4725 Å
Posts: 13410
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 5:33 am

Re: APOD: The Cone Nebula from Hubble (2024 Feb 04)

Post by Ann » Mon Feb 05, 2024 6:33 pm

johnnydeep wrote: Mon Feb 05, 2024 6:12 pm
Ann wrote: Mon Feb 05, 2024 6:06 pm
johnnydeep wrote: Mon Feb 05, 2024 5:57 pm

Thanks, Ann. But I'm still not too convinced by any of these "sculpting" arguments. But I'm sure that's only because I'm not versed in the dynamics involved.

Also, what the heck is that coal-black globule in your Trumpler 14 image?

It's a Bok globule. :ssmile:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bok_globule

Ann
But it looks so particularly black, sharp-edged and impenetrable. Perfect place for an advanced civilization to conceal their attack fleet. 😊😊

I admit that the Bok globule of cluster Trumpler 14 looks unnaturally black. I suppose this is either a product of the filter used for the picture, or else it is caused by the the processing.

R136, the magnificent central cluster of the Tarantula Nebula, sports two big bad black dust lanes/Bok Globules. Admittedly they don't look as black as the one in Trumpler 14.


IC 2944 is the Milky Way cluster that is most famous for sporting really black Bok Globules:


But it's this critter in the Carina Nebula that is my favorite Bok Globule! Mister Caterpillar!


Ann
Color Commentator

User avatar
johnnydeep
Commodore
Posts: 2831
Joined: Sun Feb 20, 2011 8:57 pm

Re: APOD: The Cone Nebula from Hubble (2024 Feb 04)

Post by johnnydeep » Mon Feb 05, 2024 6:40 pm

Ann wrote: Mon Feb 05, 2024 6:33 pm
johnnydeep wrote: Mon Feb 05, 2024 6:12 pm
Ann wrote: Mon Feb 05, 2024 6:06 pm

It's a Bok globule. :ssmile:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bok_globule

Ann
But it looks so particularly black, sharp-edged and impenetrable. Perfect place for an advanced civilization to conceal their attack fleet. 😊😊

I admit that the Bok globule of cluster Trumpler 14 looks unnaturally black. I suppose this is either a product of the filter used for the picture, or else it is caused by the the processing.

R136, the magnificent central cluster of the Tarantula Nebula, sports two big bad black dust lanes/Bok Globules. Admittedly they don't look as black as the one in Trumpler 14.


IC 2944 is the Milky Way cluster that is most famous for sporting really black Bok Globules:


But it's this critter in the Carina Nebula that is my favorite Bok Globule! Mister Caterpillar!


Ann
Ok. Yes, some of those smaller "Thackeray Globules" in IC 2944 are quite similar looking.
--
"To B̬̻̋̚o̞̮̚̚l̘̲̀᷾d̫͓᷅ͩḷ̯᷁ͮȳ͙᷊͠ Go......Beyond The F͇̤i̙̖e̤̟l̡͓d͈̹s̙͚ We Know."{ʲₒʰₙNYᵈₑᵉₚ}