10 reasons

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Re: 10 reasons

Post by owlice » Mon Aug 13, 2012 10:42 pm

emc wrote:ART, far more fire than eats.
Indeed he is, indeed he is.
A closed mouth gathers no foot.

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Re: 10 reasons

Post by neufer » Tue Aug 14, 2012 11:26 am

Image
owlice wrote:
emc wrote:
ART, far more fire than eats.
Indeed he is, indeed he is.
Nothing [monstrous], but our undertakings;
when we vow to weep seas, live in fire,
eat rocks, tame tigers.
Art Neuendorffer

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Re: 10 reasons

Post by Beyond » Tue Aug 14, 2012 1:22 pm

neufer wrote:Accusatiuo hinc :!:
The only part of that i know anything about is--> :!: .
I Binged -Accusatiuo hinc- and what a load of crap that had nothing at all to do with it, came up.
That's one reason i stay away from Shaked Speare type stuff, unintelligibleness :!:
To find the Truth, you must go Beyond.

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Re: 10 reasons

Post by emc » Wed Aug 15, 2012 7:48 pm

I have trouble following Neufer sometimes... it has a humbling effect. But sometimes I understand later and laugh!

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Re: 10 reasons

Post by neufer » Wed Aug 15, 2012 8:11 pm

emc wrote:
I have trouble following Neufer sometimes... it has a humbling effect.

But sometimes I understand later and laugh!
  • Boit L'obstacle :!:
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Re: 10 reasons

Post by Beyond » Wed Aug 15, 2012 10:38 pm

See? He did it again :!:
To find the Truth, you must go Beyond.

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Re: 10 reasons

Post by emc » Thu Aug 16, 2012 11:17 am

neufer wrote:
  • Boit L'obstacle :!:
To your health as well my friend!

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Mary Quantrell

Post by neufer » Sun Sep 16, 2012 3:04 pm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Fritchie wrote:
<<Barbara Fritchie (née Hauer) (December 3, 1766 – December 18, 1862) was a Unionist during the Civil War. She was born in Lancaster, Pennsylvania, and married John Casper Fritchie, a *glove maker* , on May 6, 1806. Barbara Fritchie was a friend of [FREEMASON] Francis Scott Key and they participated together in a memorial service at Frederick, Maryland, when [FREEMASON] George Washington died.

According to one story, at the age of 95 she waved the Union flag in the middle of the street to block, or at least antagonize Stonewall Jackson's troops, as they passed though Frederick in the Maryland Campaign. This event is the subject of John Greenleaf Whittier's poem of 1864, Barbara Frietchie. When [FREEMASON] Winston Churchill passed through Frederick in 1943, he stopped at the house and recited the poem from memory, an excerpt of which follows.
  • "Shoot, if you must, this old gray head,
    But spare your country's flag," she said.
    A shade of sadness, a blush of shame,
    Over the face of the leader came;
    The nobler nature within him stirred
    To life at that woman's deed and word;
    "Who touches a hair of yon gray head
    Dies like a dog! March on!" he said.....
The flag incident in the poem, however, likely never occurred as Barbara Fritchie was sick in bed that day. She told the housekeeper to hide all valuables to prevent looting, and to take the U.S. flag that hung outside, but it was never moved, and as a result was shot up by the Confederate troops. Accounts differ as to how the legend that inspired the poem arose. The flag, a symbol of the need for myth in times of war, may be seen in the Barbara Fritchie House and Museum.

History disproves the poem with the fact that the Confederate troops never passed by her house. Although they were within range of sight, they would only have been heard by Mrs. Fritchie if they had yelled to her at the top of their lungs. The troops marched south on Bentz Street and turned west on Patrick Street. To have passed Barbara Fritchie's house, they would have needed to turn east and march a minimum of 1000 feet to have been at her door.>>
http://tinyurl.com/9pkzmng wrote:Barbara Fritchie didn’t wave that flag
By Robert McCartney, Washington Post, 9/16/2012

<<Alas, one of my childhood heroines turns out to be a sham. Although gray-headed Barbara Fritchie did in fact live in Frederick when Confederate troops marched through town en route to their historic defeat at Antietam 150 years ago, she was not the one who defiantly displayed the Union flag as legend recalls. The brave flag-waver was instead a neighbor named Mary Quantrell, according to witnesses’ accounts and news reports from the era. But virtually no one remembers Quantrell because Fritchie was the one immortalized a year after the event in a propagandistic Civil War poem by John Greenleaf Whittier. Despite its illegitimacy, the Fritchie story offers intriguing insights into how historical myths arise and are exploited for status and profit. A reconstruction of Fritchie’s house is still one of Frederick’s top tourist draws, even though city officials are careful to describe her celebrated act on Sept. 10, 1862, as “alleged.”

The ballad of Frederick’s best-known citizen delighted me when I encountered it in school, and I am not alone. Winston Churchill surprised his host, Franklin Roosevelt, by reciting its 60 lines from memory on a visit to Frederick in 1943. I took pride that a fellow Marylander had been stoutly pro-Union and stood up to famed rebel general Stonewall Jackson. The poem says Fritchie, 95, shamed Jackson into leaving her and the flag alone. Now I learn that Fritchie’s fame sprang from poetic license run amok. This emerged when I researched the tale in advance of Monday’s anniversary of Antietam, the crucial battle that prompted Lincoln to issue the Emancipation Proclamation.

Quantrell, in her late 30s, held up the Stars and Stripes on her porch while Confederate soldiers tramped down Patrick Street, according to seven witnesses cited in a book by a Frederick resident who respected Fritchie but wanted to get the story right. Quantrell had a verbal altercation with a Confederate officer, who was probably Gen. A.P. Hill rather than the better-known Jackson.

No firsthand account speaks of Fritchie displaying the flag or even being seen in public that day. Professional historians have long dismissed the story. Whittier was apparently misled by thirdhand information he received from a fellow writer in Washington. When Quantrell died in 1879, both major Frederick newspapers identified her as the genuine inspiration for the ballad. “Both women were real-life residents of Frederick, but when it comes to Whittier’s poem, Mary Quantrell was the real-life heroine,” said Christopher Haugh, a Frederick County tourism official who has been researching the matter for six years. Whittier’s papers at Swarthmore College include an 1876 letter from Quantrell pleading with him to correct the record. Directly beneath her signature, she identified herself, in quotes, as “Barbara.”

Disputes about the poem’s veracity arose almost immediately after it was published. Neither Fritchie nor Gen. Jackson was available to comment, as both had died before the ballad appeared. Fritchie’s stardom was preserved partly because her nieces and other descendants labored for decades to promote her reputation and protect the family name. They led a campaign that erected a memorial to her in 1914 over objections that it honored a woman for something she never did. Fritchie was the subject of a song, a Broadway play and three silent films. A motorcycle race and horse race are named for her.

The Fritchie fable has long been one of Frederick’s most reliable moneymakers. Local merchants have used her name and image since the early 1900s to attract tourists and sell local products, including women’s stockings, hams and canned vegetables. I remember eating Barbara Fritchie chocolates as a child after touring the house. “Her name was merchandising gold,” said Carrie Blough, curator of the Historical Society of Frederick County. She organized a current exhibition of Fritchie products and memorabilia.

Nobody has put Mary Quantrell’s name on a can of peas. Her grave, which tourism official Haugh intrepidly located in Glenwood Cemetery off North Capitol Street in Northeast, bears no mention of her feat. “I hope at some point I can get some marker or plaque. I feel some bonding with this poor Mary Quantrell,” Haugh said.

I’d donate a few bucks to that cause. If we still thrill to an act of patriotic courage a century and half after the fact, we ought to honor the individual who actually did the deed.>>
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Re: Mary Quantrell

Post by owlice » Sun Sep 16, 2012 10:08 pm

neufer wrote:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Fritchie wrote: Nobody has put Mary Quantrell’s name on a can of peas. Her grave, which tourism official Haugh intrepidly located in Glenwood Cemetery off North Capitol Street in Northeast, bears no mention of her feat.
Thanks for this, Art. I can't put her name on a can of peas, but I can put flowers on her grave, and will, the next time I'm at Glenwood.
A closed mouth gathers no foot.

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Re: Mary Quantrell

Post by neufer » Sun Sep 16, 2012 11:43 pm

owlice wrote:
neufer wrote:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Fritchie wrote:
Nobody has put Mary Quantrell’s name on a can of peas. Her grave, which tourism official Haugh intrepidly located in Glenwood Cemetery off North Capitol Street in Northeast, bears no mention of her feat.
Thanks for this, Art. I can't put her name on a can of peas, but I can put flowers on her grave, and will, the next time I'm at Glenwood.
Finding her grave may be like opening a can of peas.

http://www.findagrave.com/php/famous.ph ... yid=104434
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Re: 10 reasons

Post by owlice » Mon Sep 17, 2012 1:13 am

Interesting link; thanks for that! Did not even occur to me to try to find this info online! There's a reference in the Glenwood office which lists who is buried where there.
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Re: Mary Quantrell

Post by neufer » Mon Sep 17, 2012 10:52 am





Barbara Frietchie’s work is o’er,
And the Rebel rides on his raids nor more.

Honor to her! and let a tear
Fall, for her sake, on Stonewalls’ bier.

Over Barbara Frietchie’s grave,
Flag of Freedom and Union, wave!

Peace and order and beauty draw
Round they symbol of light and law;

And ever the stars above look down
On thy stars below in Frederick town!
Art Neuendorffer

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Re: 10 reasons

Post by owlice » Mon Sep 17, 2012 12:14 pm

Meanwhile, the Confederate troops were (perhaps) singing what eventually became the (horrible) Maryland state song, prompting many a student at the flagship campus of the University of Maryland to ask, "Why is O Christmas Tree played on campus every day?"

The third verse is the only verse sung regularly, and some of us still laugh, or at least smile at one another and raise our eyebrows, at good ol' Howard, even upon the hundredth or so singing of these wretched lyrics.

A flag would be a more fitting tribute to Quantrell; I'll see what I can do.
A closed mouth gathers no foot.

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Re: Mary Quantrell

Post by neufer » Mon Sep 17, 2012 2:17 pm

owlice wrote:
Meanwhile, the Confederate troops were (perhaps) singing what eventually became the (horrible) Maryland state song, prompting many a student at the flagship campus of the University of Maryland to ask, "Why is O Christmas Tree played on campus every day?" The third verse is the only verse sung regularly, and some of us still laugh, or at least smile at one another and raise our eyebrows, at good ol' Howard, even upon the hundredth or so singing of these wretched lyrics.
At least it is not as Bland as: "Carry Me Back to Old Virginny"
http://tinyurl.com/94ew9hg wrote:
Don’t let Virginia ID law discourage voting
Robert McCartney, Washington Post, 9/13/2012

<<Fortunately, the revised voting requirements in Virginia aren’t nearly as onerous as in some other states, such as Pennsylvania. Even a current utility bill, showing one’s name and address, is among the documents that will satisfy polling officials. A state voter card, a driver’s license, a concealed-handgun permit or several other kinds of identification will also suffice.>>
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Truth_Machine wrote:
<<The Truth Machine (1996) is a science fiction novel by James L. Halperin about a genius who invents an infallible lie detector. Soon, every citizen must pass a thorough test under a Truth Machine to get a job or receive any sort of license. Eventually, people begin wearing them all the time, thus eliminating dishonesty in all parts of human interaction, and eliminating crime, terrorism and a great deal of general social problems.>>
http://www.amazon.com/The-Truth-Machine-Speculative-Novel/dp/product-description/0345410564 wrote:
<<Beginning in 1991 and traversing almost 60 years, [_The Truth Machine_] follows "Pete" Armstrong from child prodigy, through Harvard at age 12, to fame and wealth from his invention of ACIP (Armstrong Cerebral Image Processor)? While ACIP revolutionizes the legal, penal, and political systems as well as personal and business relations and fosters a world government, Pete harbors a terrible secret that will be exposed when the ACIP patent expires in 2049.
  • It took over 10 hours to add about 400 clandestine lines of new code; cleverly devised, covert instructions that would allow Pete, if he concentrated on a certain poem, to override the ACIP:
    • O Captain! my Captain! our fearful trip is done;
      The ship has weathered every rack, the prize we sought is won;
      The port is near, the bells I hear, the people all exulting,
      While follow eyes the steady keel, the vessel grim and daring...>>
owlice wrote:
A flag would be a more fitting tribute to Quantrell; I'll see what I can do.
Good for you, Owlice. You go girl!
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Listen, my children, and you shall hear...

Post by neufer » Fri Sep 21, 2012 3:05 am

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paul_REVERE%27s_Ride wrote:
<<"Paul REVERE's Ride" (1860) is a poem by [the only American poet commemorated in Westminster Abbey's Poet's Corner] Henry Wadsworth Longfellow that commemorates the actions of American patriot Paul REVERE (December 21, 1734 – May 10, 1818) on April 18, 1775. It was first published in the January 1861 issue of The Atlantic Monthly. It was later re-published in Longfellow's Tales of a Wayside Inn as "The Landlord's Tale" in 1863. The poem served as the first in a series of 22 narratives bundled as a collection, similar to Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales, and was published in three installments over 10 years.

  • Listen, my children, and you shall hear
    Of the midnight ride of Paul REVERE,
    On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-Five;
    Hardly a man is now alive
    Who remembers that famous day and year
The poem is spoken by the landlord of the Wayside Inn and tells a partly fictionalized story of Paul REVERE. In the poem, REVERE tells a friend to prepare signal lanterns in the Old North Church to inform him if the British will attack by land or sea. He would await the signal across the river in Charlestown and be ready to spread the alarm throughout Middlesex County, Massachusetts. The unnamed friend climbs up the steeple and soon sets up two signal lanterns, informing REVERE that the British are coming by sea. REVERE rides his horse through Medford, Lexington, and Concord to warn the patriots.

Longfellow's family had a connection to the historical Paul REVERE. His maternal grandfather, [FREEMASON] Peleg Wadsworth, was REVERE's commander on the Penobscot Expedition. Paul REVERE was one of the first York Rite Freemasons in Colonial Massachusetts when he became a Royal Arch Mason and Knight Templar on December 11, 1769 according to the records of St. Andrew's Royal Arch Chapter, Boston, Massachusetts. He also served as Most Worshipful Grand Master of The Grand Lodge of Massachusetts, A.F. & A.M. from December 12, 1794 to December 27, 1797.

When the poem was written in 1860, America was on the verge of Civil War. Longfellow first came forward publicly as an abolitionist in 1842 with the publication of his Poems on Slavery. Though he admitted the book made little impact, it was written for his best friend, Charles Sumner, an activist abolitionist politician with whom he would continue to share common cause on the issues of slavery and the Union. The poem was published in the January, 1861, issue of the The Atlantic magazine on December 20, 1860, just as South Carolina became the first state to secede from the United States. "Paul REVERE's Ride" was meant to appeal to Northerners' sense of urgency and, as a call for action, noted that history favors the courageous. Longfellow, who often used poetry to remind readers of cultural and moral values, warns at the end of the poem of a coming "hour of darkness and peril and need", implying the breakup of the Union, and suggests that the "people will waken and listen to hear" the midnight message again. By emphasizing common history, he was attempting to dissolve social tensions.

The phrase "Hardly a man is now alive" was true as one of the last men alive at the time had only recently died. Jonathan Harrington, the young fifer for Lexington's miltia during the battles of Lexington and Concord, died at the age of 96 in 1854, a few years before the poem was written. The poem fluctuates between past and present tense, sometimes in the same sentence, symbolically pulling the actions of the Revolution into modern times and displaying an event with timeless sympathies.

Longfellow's poem is not historically accurate but his "mistakes" were deliberate. He had researched the historical event, using works like George Bancroft's History of the United States, but he manipulated the facts for poetic effect. He was purposely trying to create American legends, much as he did with works like The Song of Hiawatha (1855) and The Courtship of Miles Standish (1858).

Modern critics of the poem emphasize its many historical inaccuracies. For example, the poem depicts the lantern signal in the Old North Church as meant for REVERE and not from him, as was actually the case. The historical Paul REVERE did not receive the lantern signal, but actually was the one who ordered it to be set up. The poem also depicts REVERE rowing himself across the Charles River when, in reality, he was rowed over by others. He also never reached Concord. Another inaccuracy is a general lengthening of the time frame of the night's events.

The majority of criticism, however, notes that Longfellow gave sole credit to REVERE for the collective achievements of three riders (as well as the other riders whose names do not survive to history). In fact, REVERE and William Dawes rode from Boston to Lexington to warn John Hancock and Samuel Adams that British soldiers were marching from Boston to Lexington to arrest Hancock and Adams and seize the weapons stores in Concord. REVERE and Dawes then rode toward Concord, where the militia's arsenal was hidden. They were joined by Samuel Prescott, a doctor who happened to be in Lexington. REVERE, Dawes, and Prescott were stopped by British troops in Lincoln on the road to nearby Concord. Prescott and Dawes escaped, but REVERE was detained and questioned and then escorted at gunpoint by three British officers back to Lexington. Of the three riders, only Prescott arrived at Concord in time to warn the militia there.

Longfellow's poem is credited with creating the national legend of Paul REVERE, a previously little-known Massachusetts silversmith. Upon REVERE's death in 1818, for example, his obituary did not mention his midnight ride but instead focused on his business sense and his many friends. The fame that Longfellow brought to REVERE, however, did not materialize until after the Civil War amidst the Colonial Revival Movement of the 1870s. In 1875, for example, the Old North Church mentioned in the poem began an annual custom called the "lantern ceremony" recreating the action of the poem. Three years later, the Church added a plaque noting it as the site of "the signal lanterns of Paul REVERE". REVERE's elevated historical importance also led to unsubstantiated rumors that he made a set of false teeth for George Washington. REVERE's legendary status continued for decades and, in part due to Longfellow's poem, authentic silverware made by REVERE commanded high prices. Wall Street tycoon J. P. Morgan, for example, offered $100,000 for a punch bowl REVERE made.

In 1883, Boston held a national competition for an equestrian statue of REVERE. It was won by Cyrus Edwin Dallin, although his model was not accepted until 1899, and the statue was not dedicated until 1940. It stands in "Paul REVERE Plaza," opposite the Old North Church.

In 1896 Helen F. Moore, dismayed that William Dawes had been forgotten, penned a parody of Longfellow's poem:

  • 'Tis all very well for the children to hear
    Of the midnight ride of Paul REVERE;
    But why should my name be quite forgot,
    Who rode as boldly and well, God wot?
    Why should I ask? The reason is clear—
    My name was Dawes and his REVERE.
For a long time, historians of the American Revolution as well as textbook writers relied almost entirely on Longfellow's poem as historical evidence – creating substantial misconceptions in the minds of the American people.>>
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Re: 10 reasons

Post by Moonlady » Thu Oct 04, 2012 4:16 am

I think many writers in medieval Europe were women but had to hide as male writers to be published and get attention at all...I bet some of the literature published as
Shakespeare as the author was written by at least one woman!
I think they were a circle of writers, men and women, who thought, it would be great to publish literature as Shakespeare, a random name they picked from their homeplace...


Keep up the argument, in two weeks, we can celebrate the first year of debating and discussing this topic!

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Re: 10 reasons

Post by neufer » Thu Oct 04, 2012 12:35 pm

Moonlady wrote:
I think many writers in medieval Europe were women but had to hide as male writers to be published and get attention at all...I bet some of the literature published as Shakespeare as the author was written by at least one woman! I think they were a circle of writers, men and women, who thought, it would be great to publish literature as Shakespeare, a random name they picked from their homeplace...
Image
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mary_Sidney wrote:
<<Mary Herbert (née Sidney), Countess of Pembroke
(27 October 1561 – 25 September 1621), was one of the first
English women to achieve a major reputation for her literary works,
poetry, poetic translations and literary patronage.>>
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Re: 10 reasons

Post by Moonlady » Thu Oct 11, 2012 5:29 am

Me thinks the Comtess of Pembroke came up with the idea of founding the Shakespeare Project!
Shakespears mother's name was Mary too, from a wealthy family!

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The Rose Theatre by any other name.

Post by neufer » Wed Nov 14, 2012 1:54 pm

=======================================================
  • Antony and Cleopatra Act 2, Scene 7
MARK ANTONY [To OCTAVIUS CAESAR]: They take the flow o' the Nile
  • By certain scales i' the pyramid; they know,
    By the height, the lowness, or the mean, if dearth
    Or foison follow: the higher Nilus swells,
    The more it promises: as it ebbs, the seedsman
    Upon the slime and ooze scatters his grain,
    And shortly comes to harvest
    .
http://www.sarahsmith.com/books/chasingshakespeares/chasing%20shakespeares%20extras/footnotes/footnotes_part4.htm wrote:
ImageImage
[list]<<There’s a map of London, 1600, that shows
the [Elizabethan Southwark London] theaters

{i.e.,
[list] 1) The Hope / Bear(e)garden ,
2) The Rose / The Star(e) , :arrow:
3) and Shakespeare's Globe }[/list]
in their relationship to each other:
[in] John Norden’s Civitas Londini.>>[/list][/color]
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orion_correlation_theory wrote: <<The Orion correlation theory (or Giza–Orion correlation theory) is a hypothesis in pyramidology. Its central claim is that there is a correlation between the location of the 3 largest pyramids of the Giza pyramid complex and the three middle stars of the constellation Orion, and that this correlation was intended as such by the builders of the pyramids. The stars of Orion were associated with Osiris, the sun-god of rebirth and afterlife, by the ancient Egyptians. Depending on the version of the theory, additional pyramids can be included to complete the picture of the Orion constellation, and the Nile river can be included to match with the Milky Way galaxy.

The Orion correlation theory was first put forward by Robert Bauval in 1983. One night, while working in Saudi Arabia, he took his family and a friend's family up into the sand dunes of the Arabian desert for a camping expedition. His friend pointed out Orion, and mentioned that Mintaka, the smaller more westerly of the stars making up Orion's belt was offset slightly from the others. Bauval then made a connection between the layout of the three main stars in Orion's belt and the layout of the three main pyramids in the Giza necropolis. He published this idea in 1989 in the journal Discussions in Egyptology, volume 13. The idea has been further expounded by Bauval in collaboration with Adrian Gilbert (The Orion Mystery, 1994) and Graham Hancock (Keeper of Genesis, 1996), as well as in their separate publications. The basis of this theory concerns the proposition that the relative positions of three main Ancient Egyptian pyramids on the Giza plateau are (by design) correlated with the relative positions of the three stars in the constellation of Orion which make up Orion's Belt— as these stars appeared 10,000 BC.

Their initial claims regarding the alignment of the Giza pyramids with Orion ("…the three pyramids were a terrestrial map of the three stars of Orion's belt"— Hancock's Fingerprints of the Gods, 1995, p. 375) are later joined with speculation about the age of the Great Sphinx (Hancock and Bauval, Keeper of Genesis, published 1996, and in 1997 in the U.S. as The Message of the Sphinx). According to these works, the Great Sphinx was constructed c. 10,500 BC (Upper Paleolithic), and its lion-shape is maintained to be a definitive reference to the constellation of Leo. Furthermore, the orientation and dispositions of the Sphinx, the Giza pyramids and the Nile River relative to one another on the ground is put forward as an accurate reflection or "map" of the constellations of Leo, Orion (specifically, Orion's Belt) and the Milky Way respectively. As Hancock puts it in 1998's The Mars Mystery (co-authored with Bauval):

...we have demonstrated with a substantial body of evidence that the pattern of stars that is "frozen" on the ground at Giza in the form of the three pyramids and the Sphinx represents the disposition of the constellations of Orion and Leo as they looked at the moment of sunrise on the spring equinox during the astronomical "Age of Leo" (i.e., the epoch in which the Sun was "housed" by Leo on the spring equinox.) Like all precessional ages this was a 2,160-year period. It is generally calculated to have fallen between the Gregorian calendar dates of 10,970 and 8810 BC. (op. cit., p.189)

The allusions to dates c. 12,500 years ago are significant to Hancock since this is the era he seeks to assign to the advanced progenitor civilization, now vanished, but which he contends through most of his works had existed and whose advanced technology influenced and shaped the development of the world's (known) civilizations of antiquity. Egyptology and archaeological science maintain that available evidence indicates that the Giza pyramids were constructed during the Fourth dynasty period (3rd millennium BC), while the exact date of the Great Sphinx is still unclear. Hancock does not dispute the dating evidence for the pyramids, but instead argues that they must have been planned with the knowledge of how the stars had appeared some eight thousand years before they were actually built —since the Orion correlation theory claims they are oriented that way— which it is implied provides further evidence for the influence of a technology and knowledge which would not have been available to the pyramids' builders.>>
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The 47 conspiracy

Post by neufer » Fri Nov 23, 2012 10:14 pm

Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Ann wrote:
But I was saying, too, that I don't deny that conspiracies happen, but that I need a lot of explaining and a lot of good logic and compelling arguments before I will believe in one.
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Re: The 47 conspiracy

Post by Beyond » Fri Nov 23, 2012 11:40 pm

neufer wrote:
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Ann wrote:
But I was saying, too, that I don't deny that conspiracies happen, but that I need a lot of explaining and a lot of good logic and compelling arguments before I will believe in one.
A 47 conspiracy :?: :?: Well, lets see if it adds up. 4+7=11 1+1=2 Nope, it's just 2-hard to believe there's a 47 conspiracy :!:
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Re: 10 reasons

Post by neufer » Thu Dec 06, 2012 4:31 pm

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Re: 10 reasons

Post by Beyond » Fri Dec 07, 2012 1:12 am

Dr. Shaky. I didn't know that.
To be, or not to be, charged full price for the diagnosis. That, is the question.
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Common Misconceptions

Post by neufer » Sat Dec 08, 2012 11:21 am

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A Slinky that has lost its spring.

Post by neufer » Wed Jan 09, 2013 11:15 pm

Ann wrote:
Art, this is for you. And for you too, owlice.
Image
4:
The only handwriting that exists
in Shakespeare's own hand is six shaky signatures.
http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2013/01/09/168967361/signature-doodle-check-how-a-treasury-secretary-lew-might-sign-your-dollars wrote:
Signature? Doodle? Check How A Treasury Secretary Lew Might Sign Your Dollars
by Mark Memmott January 09, 2013 2:47 PM <<Treasury secretaries get to see their signatures on the nation's currency. With word that President Obama wants to nominate his chief of staff, Jacob "Jack" Lew," to that post, lots of sites are taking a look at his rather unique signature.

— "A Slinky that has lost its spring." (New York magazine)

— "Most ridiculous John Hancock ever?" (AOL.com).

— "The best thing about a Treasury Secretary Jack Lew." (The Washington Post)

New York thinks Lew might try to "upgrade his penmanship" before submitting his official signature. It sounds like many might be disappointed if he does that.

Want to see how Lew's signature compares to Treasury secretaries over the years (and to the nation's treasurers, who also get to have their names on paper currency, which was introduced in 1861)? There's a fairly complete list with images here.>>
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