Submissions: 2020 January

See new, spectacular, or mysterious sky images.
User avatar
Ann
4725 Å
Posts: 10569
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 5:33 am

Re: Submissions: 2020 January

Post by Ann » Fri Jan 10, 2020 7:21 am

Lighty wrote:
Thu Jan 09, 2020 7:26 pm
NGC 1499 - California in colors


A known nebula but nevertheless rather difficult to photograph, all in nuances, volumes, and "blur / sharp" effect.

Located in the constellation of Perseus, 70 light years long and +/- 1500 light years away from us, it is a very beautiful veil of interstellar gas which emits light in the near infrared. This large "cloud" is illuminated (or in gravitational interaction) by / with the blue star Menkib, in the top center of the image, and "above" the nebula.

Picture processing was very sensitive to treat. It may be possible to give it a lot of different shades and gradations, the whole thing is to remain consistent with the original colors.

Here, I wanted to emphasize its richness of nuances, especially on the "lower part" which has more yellow hues, rather than staying on a gradient of red and magenta only. The clouds around the nebulae are also present.

1st ever HaRGB image I was able to take, at the end of 2019.

Exifs & gear :

Nikon D750 Astrodon
TS Optics Imaging Star 71/347 f/4.9
Baader Ha 7nm 2" and Astronomik CLS 2" filters
Astrotrac TT320X AG
Berlebach UNI Astro 4 Custom

Ha : 175x240s - good sky conditions
RVB : 65x180s - average sky conditions
+DOF

Pre-processing and stacking : Siril 0.9.12
Processing : Photoshop CC 2017


High resolution (recommended) :
https://www.astrobin.com/pvdnpy/


Copyright: Maxime Oudoux
https://maximeoudouxphotographie.fr


NGC1499-HaRVB.jpg
Beautiful, Maxime! :D As a color commentator, I really applaud your efforts to bring out all the hues and nuances of the California Nebula. The full size image is so beautiful! :D

An aside: Menkib is an O-type star, and its torrential output of ultraviolet photons is kicking electrons from their usual shells in hydrogen atoms (i.e., the hydrogen is ionized). When an electron "falls back" to its normal shell, the excess energy that kicked the electron out of its normal position in the first place is radiated back into space as a photon of red light. So it is Menkib that is ionizing the California Nebula and making it glow red. Menkib is also a runaway star, heading directly for the California Nebula, and I guess its high speed and very strong stellar winds act like a plow and give the California Nebula its arc-like shape.

Ann
Color Commentator

User avatar
Ann
4725 Å
Posts: 10569
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 5:33 am

Re: Submissions: 2020 January

Post by Ann » Fri Jan 10, 2020 7:45 am

Freddyuniverse wrote:
Thu Jan 09, 2020 10:12 pm
Between the constellations of Monoceros and Orion
Cámara; Canon 6D Modified
Pentax67SMC 90mm
300" ISO 1600
December 26, 2019
Procesed with PixInsight
https://cms.e.jimdo.com/app/cms/preview ... e-caballo/
www.freddyuniverse.com
Between the constellations of Monoceros and Orion, a region full of Emission Nebulae, Dark Nebulae and interesting stars. At the top in the constellation of Monoceros, Cone Nebulae, La Rosette and R1 Dark Nebula Complex. In the middle of the photo, the red supergiant star, Betelgeuse, the second brightest star in the constellation Orion, just now in December 2019 has declined dramatically for two months, calling the attention of astronomers and fans who they debated and speculate if it could be the next supernova. Below, The Barnard Loop, surrounding the Orion Belt and The Horsehead Nebula.Copyright: © Freddyuniverse, Alfredo Sayalero
https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/493 ... 7d93_b.jpg
09012020-RossetaCabezaResam by Freddy S., en Flickr
Stunning, Freddy! Your image packs a ton of information and looks amazing! :D

I love the colors, of course, but I also love all the subtle details. See, for example, how Barnard's Arc seems to cut a light brown "dust curtain" in half. There is no dust "below Barnard's Arc" on the right side, but there is all this light brown dust on the left side.

Note how the region around Orion's Belt sparkles with blue stars like fireworks! There is no such display of "stellar prickling of the sky" anywhere else in the picture. I love the diffraction spikes around Alnilam, the middle Belt star, which makes it glitter like a diamond.

Betelgeuse sure looks lonely in the sky. There are no stars around it, although the brown nebulosity in the lower left part of the image appears to point a stubby finger in the direction of Betelgeuse. The red supergiant is a runaway star, moving in such a way that the brown dust could just possibly be a trail left in its wake.

And I didn't even comment on your portrait of the Rosette Nebula, the Cone Nebula and friends. But they look lovely too. Note the very dark dust snaking around the Cone Nebula region, dropping a "blue egg" in the form of reflection nebula IC 447. Also note the dark dust surrounding the Rosette Nebula, especially on the left side.

It is so fascinating to see Orion and the nebulosities of Monoceros in this "sideways view". You really made me look at Orion (and Monoceros) with a whole new approach of attention and fascination!

Ann
Color Commentator

Freddyuniverse
Ensign
Posts: 16
Joined: Tue Jul 24, 2018 11:15 pm

Re: Submissions: 2020 January

Post by Freddyuniverse » Fri Jan 10, 2020 10:09 am

Ann wrote:
Fri Jan 10, 2020 7:45 am
Freddyuniverse wrote:
Thu Jan 09, 2020 10:12 pm
Between the constellations of Monoceros and Orion
Cámara; Canon 6D Modified
Pentax67SMC 90mm
300" ISO 1600
December 26, 2019
Procesed with PixInsight
https://cms.e.jimdo.com/app/cms/preview ... e-caballo/
www.freddyuniverse.com
Between the constellations of Monoceros and Orion, a region full of Emission Nebulae, Dark Nebulae and interesting stars. At the top in the constellation of Monoceros, Cone Nebulae, La Rosette and R1 Dark Nebula Complex. In the middle of the photo, the red supergiant star, Betelgeuse, the second brightest star in the constellation Orion, just now in December 2019 has declined dramatically for two months, calling the attention of astronomers and fans who they debated and speculate if it could be the next supernova. Below, The Barnard Loop, surrounding the Orion Belt and The Horsehead Nebula.Copyright: © Freddyuniverse, Alfredo Sayalero
https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/493 ... 7d93_b.jpg
09012020-RossetaCabezaResam by Freddy S., en Flickr
Stunning, Freddy! Your image packs a ton of information and looks amazing! :D

I love the colors, of course, but I also love all the subtle details. See, for example, how Barnard's Arc seems to cut a light brown "dust curtain" in half. There is no dust "below Barnard's Arc" on the right side, but there is all this light brown dust on the left side.

Note how the region around Orion's Belt sparkles with blue stars like fireworks! There is no such display of "stellar prickling of the sky" anywhere else in the picture. I love the diffraction spikes around Alnilam, the middle Belt star, which makes it glitter like a diamond.

Betelgeuse sure looks lonely in the sky. There are no stars around it, although the brown nebulosity in the lower left part of the image appears to point a stubby finger in the direction of Betelgeuse. The red supergiant is a runaway star, moving in such a way that the brown dust could just possibly be a trail left in its wake.

And I didn't even comment on your portrait of the Rosette Nebula, the Cone Nebula and friends. But they look lovely too. Note the very dark dust snaking around the Cone Nebula region, dropping a "blue egg" in the form of reflection nebula IC 447. Also note the dark dust surrounding the Rosette Nebula, especially on the left side.

It is so fascinating to see Orion and the nebulosities of Monoceros in this "sideways view". You really made me look at Orion (and Monoceros) with a whole new approach of attention and fascination!

Ann
Hello Ann, the picture is really spectacular and has a different frame but with your explanation I see it much more interesting! and that I've been watching for many hours while the process !!!! Is that light brown powder really the trail left by Betelgeuse? We will have to investigate it, it would be incredible. Thank you very much for commenting on the photo Ann, you made me look at her with different eyes!

Freddy

ac4lt
Asternaut
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Jan 10, 2020 2:49 pm

Re: Submissions: 2020 January

Post by ac4lt » Fri Jan 10, 2020 2:55 pm

ImageM33 by Linda Thomas-Fowler, on Flickr

14.7 hours from Bortle 7 sky in Northern Virginia. In the fall, M33 was my secondary target. When the primary target for the night went behind the neighbor's tree I would switch to M33 which, by then, was high in the sky. I finally processed what I had collected in early January and was amazed at the detail my small 80mm refractor was able to pick up. Drizzle integration and deconvolution amaze me with their nearly magical ability to get more detail out of an image than I ever thought possible

Thanks for looking!

Lighty
Asternaut
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Nov 29, 2017 8:45 am

Re: Submissions: 2020 January

Post by Lighty » Fri Jan 10, 2020 4:46 pm

Ann wrote:
Fri Jan 10, 2020 7:21 am
Lighty wrote:
Thu Jan 09, 2020 7:26 pm
NGC 1499 - California in colors


A known nebula but nevertheless rather difficult to photograph, all in nuances, volumes, and "blur / sharp" effect.

Located in the constellation of Perseus, 70 light years long and +/- 1500 light years away from us, it is a very beautiful veil of interstellar gas which emits light in the near infrared. This large "cloud" is illuminated (or in gravitational interaction) by / with the blue star Menkib, in the top center of the image, and "above" the nebula.

Picture processing was very sensitive to treat. It may be possible to give it a lot of different shades and gradations, the whole thing is to remain consistent with the original colors.

Here, I wanted to emphasize its richness of nuances, especially on the "lower part" which has more yellow hues, rather than staying on a gradient of red and magenta only. The clouds around the nebulae are also present.

1st ever HaRGB image I was able to take, at the end of 2019.

Exifs & gear :

Nikon D750 Astrodon
TS Optics Imaging Star 71/347 f/4.9
Baader Ha 7nm 2" and Astronomik CLS 2" filters
Astrotrac TT320X AG
Berlebach UNI Astro 4 Custom

Ha : 175x240s - good sky conditions
RVB : 65x180s - average sky conditions
+DOF

Pre-processing and stacking : Siril 0.9.12
Processing : Photoshop CC 2017


High resolution (recommended) :
https://www.astrobin.com/pvdnpy/


Copyright: Maxime Oudoux
https://maximeoudouxphotographie.fr


NGC1499-HaRVB.jpg
Beautiful, Maxime! :D As a color commentator, I really applaud your efforts to bring out all the hues and nuances of the California Nebula. The full size image is so beautiful! :D

An aside: Menkib is an O-type star, and its torrential output of ultraviolet photons is kicking electrons from their usual shells in hydrogen atoms (i.e., the hydrogen is ionized). When an electron "falls back" to its normal shell, the excess energy that kicked the electron out of its normal position in the first place is radiated back into space as a photon of red light. So it is Menkib that is ionizing the California Nebula and making it glow red. Menkib is also a runaway star, heading directly for the California Nebula, and I guess its high speed and very strong stellar winds act like a plow and give the California Nebula its arc-like shape.

Ann
Thanks a lot for all your explanations, very helpful et fascinating !

User avatar
Ann
4725 Å
Posts: 10569
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 5:33 am

Re: Submissions: 2020 January

Post by Ann » Fri Jan 10, 2020 6:03 pm

ac4lt wrote:
Fri Jan 10, 2020 2:55 pm
ImageM33 by Linda Thomas-Fowler, on Flickr

14.7 hours from Bortle 7 sky in Northern Virginia. In the fall, M33 was my secondary target. When the primary target for the night went behind the neighbor's tree I would switch to M33 which, by then, was high in the sky. I finally processed what I had collected in early January and was amazed at the detail my small 80mm refractor was able to pick up. Drizzle integration and deconvolution amaze me with their nearly magical ability to get more detail out of an image than I ever thought possible

Thanks for looking!
Welcome, Linda! I can see that this is your first post here. Your portrait of M33 looks very nice indeed, particularly at full size.

Do come back here and post more pictures! :D

Ann
Color Commentator

ac4lt
Asternaut
Posts: 2
Joined: Fri Jan 10, 2020 2:49 pm

Re: Submissions: 2020 January

Post by ac4lt » Fri Jan 10, 2020 7:18 pm

Ann wrote:
Fri Jan 10, 2020 6:03 pm
Welcome, Linda! I can see that this is your first post here. Your portrait of M33 looks very nice indeed, particularly at full size.

Do come back here and post more pictures! :D

Ann
Thanks, Ann!

dvd007
Ensign
Posts: 24
Joined: Wed Jul 08, 2015 7:54 am
Location: Saint Paul Lès Dax, France

Re: Submissions: 2020 January

Post by dvd007 » Fri Jan 10, 2020 8:17 pm


Ayiomamitis
Science Officer
Posts: 101
Joined: Wed Aug 18, 2004 3:32 pm
Location: Athens, Greece

Re: Submissions: 2020 January

Post by Ayiomamitis » Sat Jan 11, 2020 1:14 am

It has been a very difficult two weeks with the weather and thanks to many weather fronts which have hit Greece from Russia. However, the conditions this evening were PRISTINE with clear skies, great transparency, slight humidity (vis a vis good seeing) and slightly elevated temperatures which made the imaging of this evening's deep penumbral lunar eclipse possible.

Deep Penumbral Maximum I
http://www.perseus.gr/Astro-Eclipses-20 ... 0-Max.html
Copyright: Anthony Ayiomamitis
ecl-lun-2020-01-10-max.jpg

Deep Penumbral Maximum II
http://www.perseus.gr/Astro-Eclipses-20 ... Seq-1.html
Copyright: Anthony Ayiomamitis
ecl-lun-2020-01-10-seq-1.jpg

Deep Penumbral Maximum III
http://www.perseus.gr/Astro-Eclipses-20 ... Seq-2.html
Copyright: Anthony Ayiomamitis
ecl-lun-2020-01-10-seq-2.jpg

Deep Penumbral Maximum IV
http://www.perseus.gr/Astro-Eclipses-20 ... Seq-3.html
Copyright: Anthony Ayiomamitis
ecl-lun-2020-01-10-seq-3.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Anthony Ayiomamitis
http://www.perseus.gr

Ayiomamitis
Science Officer
Posts: 101
Joined: Wed Aug 18, 2004 3:32 pm
Location: Athens, Greece

Re: Submissions: 2020 January

Post by Ayiomamitis » Sat Jan 11, 2020 1:17 am

Last result not loaded in the original message for some reason. Please see attachment:
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Anthony Ayiomamitis
http://www.perseus.gr

vanamonde81
Science Officer
Posts: 106
Joined: Fri Apr 12, 2013 7:46 am

Re: Submissions: 2020 January

Post by vanamonde81 » Sat Jan 11, 2020 3:39 am

Lunar Eclipse Variations
Copyright: György Soponyai

Within one year I was able to capture all three types of Lunar eclipses with the same equipment. Thus the appearance of the events can be compared.

Image

Details:
2019.01.21. total eclipse (Mogyoród, Hungary)
2019.07.16. partial eclipse (Budapest, Hungary)
2020.01.10. penumbral eclipse (Mogyoród, Hungary)

Canon EOS 5D Mark II + Tamron EF 150-600 @600mm

delberson
Ensign
Posts: 70
Joined: Mon Jul 03, 2017 2:46 pm
Location: Silvânia / GO / Brazil

Re: Submissions: 2020 January

Post by delberson » Sat Jan 11, 2020 8:32 pm


delberson
Ensign
Posts: 70
Joined: Mon Jul 03, 2017 2:46 pm
Location: Silvânia / GO / Brazil

Re: Submissions: 2020 January

Post by delberson » Sat Jan 11, 2020 8:35 pm


barretosmed
Science Officer
Posts: 243
Joined: Thu Oct 12, 2017 6:04 pm

Re: Submissions: 2020 January

Post by barretosmed » Sat Jan 11, 2020 11:41 pm

HORSEHEAD NEBULA AND FLAME NEBULA


It is approximately 1500 light years from Earth.
The Horsehead Nebula is one of the most famous nebulae in the sky. It is visible as the dark indentation of the red emission nebula in the center of the photograph above. The horse head feature is dark because it is actually a cloud of opaque dust that stands in front of the bright red emission nebula. Like clouds in Earth's atmosphere, this cosmic cloud took on a form recognizable by chance. After many thousands of years, the cloud's internal movements will change its appearance.

BEST DETAILS:
https://www.astrobin.com/full/4vrikm/C/?nc=user

EQUIPMENT:
APO TS 80MM
ASI 1600mm cooled
ASIAIR
10 X 200 BIN2 G
4 X 200 BIN2 B
15 X 200 BIN2 R
20 X 300 BIN1 L

GUIDER: asi 120mm mini and ZWO oag

LOCATION: JALES - SP - Brazil
DATES: DECEMBER 26 TO 28, 2019

Processing and Capture:
Software: @PIxinsigh, Adobe Photoshop, APT, PHD, Polemaster, SharpCap

Copyright: Fernando Oliveira de Menezes
Email: Barretosmed@hotmail.com
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

pepe30
Asternaut
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Nov 13, 2019 6:05 pm

Re: Submissions: 2020 January

Post by pepe30 » Sun Jan 12, 2020 3:22 pm

I attach my HST object IC1871

Image

more details here:
http://astrofotky.cz/gallery.php?show=P ... 591958.jpg

Carballada
Asternaut
Posts: 8
Joined: Sat Mar 16, 2019 10:19 am

Re: Submissions: 2020 January

Post by Carballada » Sun Jan 12, 2020 4:00 pm

Image

The heart of the Heart (Melotte-15) by Jose Carballada, on Flickr

This is the core part of the Heart Nebula (IC 1805, Sharpless 2-190).

The clearest part of the picture is called Melotte-15. It's an open cluster of stars, contains a few bright stars nearly 50 times the mass of our Sun, and many more dim stars that are only a fraction of our Sun's mass. The complete nebula is driven by the radiation emanating from this small group of stars.

I've always been overwhelmed by these dust pillars with their energetic light and winds eroding form the open star cluster Melotte 15.

The Heart Nebula is located about 7,500 light years away.

In my opinion it's incredible how is possible to obtain this amazing results with a modest amateur equipment.
This picture has a total integration time of 57 hours acquired with narrow band and rgb filters (SHOrgb).
The Hubble narrow band palette was used with the nebula and the stars are captured in natural rgb broadband.

Also I leave the link to my blog and astrobin where you could find all data of the picture
https://astro.carballada.com/the-heart- ... elotte-15/
https://www.astrobin.com/hey40g

conemmil
Ensign
Posts: 67
Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2012 11:45 am
Location: Thessaloniki Greece

Re: Submissions: 2020 January

Post by conemmil » Sun Jan 12, 2020 8:20 pm

Wolf Moon and Penumbral Lunar Eclipse at Parthenon Athens Greece.

The first full moon and so many things happening in one observation! I and my friend Giannis Rozakis went to view the eclipse and the full moon rising behind the temple of Parthenon last Friday night. We had great skies and under quite cold conditions we imaged the scenery while sharing old observational stories of us being alone in the dark setting up telescopes since when combined we have more than 40 years of experiences and what a better way to forget about the cold and humid weather.

We were imaging for a full 6.5 hours session and shared our stories and experience with a lot of visitors that were passing by at the moment and they all stayed in awe when they viewed the Moon rising from behind the temple!

Enjoy
Constantine Emmanouilidi
www.facebook.com/infectionphoto
WolfMoonEclipseOnParthenonSA.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Last edited by conemmil on Mon Jan 13, 2020 8:45 am, edited 1 time in total.

mdieterich
Ensign
Posts: 66
Joined: Fri Feb 13, 2015 5:50 pm

Re: Submissions: 2020 January

Post by mdieterich » Sun Jan 12, 2020 9:56 pm

Chilean Night Sky
www.mdieterichphoto.com
Copyright: Matt Dieterich

Kinch
Ensign
Posts: 99
Joined: Sat Mar 19, 2016 1:53 pm

Re: Submissions: 2020 January

Post by Kinch » Sun Jan 12, 2020 10:42 pm

LBN 973 or SH2-280

Not often imaged:
LBN 973 (1600 x 1200).jpg
Full capture details @ http://www.kinchastro.com/sh2-280-or-lbn-973.html
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

pablo22
Ensign
Posts: 66
Joined: Thu Nov 11, 2010 9:39 am

Re: Submissions: 2020 January

Post by pablo22 » Mon Jan 13, 2020 8:22 am

Antares Region
http://blog.astrofotky.cz/pavelpech
Copyright: Pavel Pech
Image

vanamonde81
Science Officer
Posts: 106
Joined: Fri Apr 12, 2013 7:46 am

Re: Submissions: 2020 January

Post by vanamonde81 » Mon Jan 13, 2020 8:42 am

Shadow of the Earth
Copyright: György Soponyai

Three eclipses that draw the form of the shadow of the Earth.
The middle of the penumbral photo squence is quite blurry due to the thin cloud layer.
In the partial photo sequence the change of Lunar disk color and brightness is caused by the different amount of Saharan dust in the atmosphere.
During the time of the total eclipse, our Moon was ~ 30.000 kilometers further off: the Earth's shadow is evidently smaller here.

Image

2019.01.21. total (mg = 1.19) Mogyoród, Hungary
2019.07.16. partial (mg = 0.65) Budapest, Hungary
2020.01.10. penumbral (mg = -0.12) Mogyoród, Hungary

Canon EOS 5D Mark II + Tamron EF 150-600 @600mm

szalaipeter
Asternaut
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Jan 14, 2020 11:23 pm

Re: Submissions: 2020 January

Post by szalaipeter » Tue Jan 14, 2020 11:32 pm

ISS Lunar transit
On 10th of January, 2020 all circumstances were perfect for a good ISS lunar transit, I didn’t even had to travel at all and ISS were only 465km away from my location. I got my transit predictions from Calsky, charged the batteries on the night before and I was ready for the challenge. The sky was clearing nicely after sunset despite the cloudy forecast, so I hoped this might be my night. I used a Skywatcher 150/750 newtonian telescope on EQ3 mount and a Canon 1200D in prime focus.I took a few test shot on the 99% illuminated Moon, expo time at 1/1250 and ISO 400. I was considering video over single shot, eventually choose the latter. Then hesitating between shooting in raw format, but due data jamming I didn’t want to risk missing it so I went for jpeg format.I started taking photos in continuous mode 2-3 seconds before the predicted transit and when I found two of my shots had ISS on it I was very happy.

User avatar
Ann
4725 Å
Posts: 10569
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 5:33 am

Re: Submissions: 2020 January

Post by Ann » Wed Jan 15, 2020 6:26 am

mdieterich wrote:
Sun Jan 12, 2020 9:56 pm
Chilean Night Sky
www.mdieterichphoto.com
Copyright: Matt Dieterich
Matt Dieterich, I love your picture, particularly the out-of-focus and beautifully colored stars. It's like seeing stars pop like tecknicolor popcorn or multihued fireflies flitting across the sky.

I love it! :D

Ann
Color Commentator

Arcturus
Ensign
Posts: 12
Joined: Tue Sep 24, 2013 10:10 pm

Re: Submissions: 2020 January

Post by Arcturus » Wed Jan 15, 2020 8:44 am

Melotte 15 - From the botton of the heart
http://jcanive.blogspot.com/2020/01/mel ... razon.html
Copyright: Jesus Canive
ImageMelotte 15 by Jesus Canive, en Flickr

Paulee97
Ensign
Posts: 18
Joined: Thu Sep 22, 2016 4:18 pm

Re: Submissions: 2020 January

Post by Paulee97 » Wed Jan 15, 2020 8:49 pm

In the end of November 2019 we had an opportunity to see one beautiful date of Moon, Venus and Jupiter. This photos describe beautiful atmosphere we had in Prague. :)
Copyright: Pavel Váňa
Canon EOS 6D, Canon 70-200 mm f/4 L

Moon dating with Venus and Jupiter at Prague castle
apod2.jpg
Beautiful meeting in Prague
apod.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.