Found Images: 2020 May

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Re: Found Images: 2020 May

Post by starsurfer » Sat May 16, 2020 10:33 pm

RCW 58 and Sandqvist 128
http://www.atacama-photographic-observa ... php?id=164
Copyright: Thierry Demange, Richard Galli and Thomas Petit
RCW58.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2020 May

Post by starsurfer » Sat May 16, 2020 10:35 pm

NGC 2403
http://www.capella-observatory.com/Imag ... GC2403.htm
Copyright: Josef Pöpsel, Stefan Binnewies and Frank Sackenheim
NGC2403.jpg
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ESO: A Galactic Ballet (Arp 271)

Post by bystander » Mon May 18, 2020 3:34 pm

A Galactic Ballet
ESO Picture of the Week | 2020 May 18
This image shows a pair of interacting galaxies known as Arp 271. Individually, these galaxies are named NGC 5426 and NGC 5427; both are spirals, and both are roughly the same size.

Some astronomers believe that these galaxies are in the process of merging to form a single entity. This interaction will create increasing numbers of new stars over the next few million years, some of which can be seen within the “bridge” of gas connecting the two galaxies. This kind of collision and interaction might also happen to our own galaxy, the Milky Way, which is likely to collide with the neighbouring Andromeda Galaxy in about five billion years time.

These galaxies lie over 120 million light years away from us, and were discovered by the German-British astronomer William Herschel in 1785. Herschel was a prolific scientist, also discovering both infrared radiation and the planet Uranus.

ESO: Arp 271 — Galaxies Drawn Together
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HEIC: Stellar Glitter in a Field of Black (ESO 461-036)

Post by bystander » Mon May 18, 2020 3:44 pm

Stellar Glitter in a Field of Black
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2020 May 18
Unlike a spiral or elliptical galaxy, the galaxy KK 246 looks like glitter spilled across a black velvet sheet. KK 246, also known as ESO 461-036, is a dwarf irregular galaxy residing within the Local Void, a vast region of empty space. This lonely galaxy is the only one known for certain to reside in this enormous volume, along with 15 others that have been tentatively identified.

Although the picture appears to be full of galaxies, they are actually beyond this void, and instead form part of other galaxy groups or clusters. Cosmic voids, such as this one, are the spaces within the web-like structure of the Universe wherein very few or no galaxies exist.

Adjacent to the Local Group, this region of empty space is at least 150 million light-years across. For perspective, our own Milky Way galaxy is estimated to be 150 000 light-years across, making this void immense in its nothingness.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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My God, it's full of stars!

Post by Ann » Mon May 18, 2020 5:22 pm

bystander wrote:
Mon May 18, 2020 3:44 pm
Stellar Glitter in a Field of Black
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2020 May 18
Unlike a spiral or elliptical galaxy, the galaxy KK 246 looks like glitter spilled across a black velvet sheet. KK 246, also known as ESO 461-036, is a dwarf irregular galaxy residing within the Local Void, a vast region of empty space. This lonely galaxy is the only one known for certain to reside in this enormous volume, along with 15 others that have been tentatively identified.

Although the picture appears to be full of galaxies, they are actually beyond this void, and instead form part of other galaxy groups or clusters. Cosmic voids, such as this one, are the spaces within the web-like structure of the Universe wherein very few or no galaxies exist.

Adjacent to the Local Group, this region of empty space is at least 150 million light-years across. For perspective, our own Milky Way galaxy is estimated to be 150 000 light-years across, making this void immense in its nothingness.
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
My God, it's full of stars!
Space Telescope wrote:

Although the picture appears to be full of galaxies...
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Re: Found Images: 2020 May

Post by Ann » Tue May 19, 2020 8:03 pm

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Re: Found Images: 2020 May

Post by starsurfer » Tue May 19, 2020 10:10 pm


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Re: Found Images: 2020 May

Post by starsurfer » Tue May 19, 2020 10:12 pm

Hickson 93 and Hickson 94
https://www.flickr.com/photos/146686921 ... 046208993/
Copyright: Franz Klauser
48905580136_2dbe86eb18.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2020 May

Post by starsurfer » Tue May 19, 2020 10:15 pm

NGC 456
https://www.astrobin.com/71haci/0/
Copyright: Rodney Watters
KgteEa7lJ_W6_1824x0_kWXURFLk.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2020 May

Post by starsurfer » Tue May 19, 2020 10:17 pm

Sh2-140 and Sh2-150
https://www.astrobin.com/gpe38e/
Copyright: Gabriel Siegl
LH1aIntfLcC4_1824x0_sWXLOnwG.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2020 May

Post by Ann » Sat May 23, 2020 6:32 am

Planetary nebulas G75.5+1.7 (Ju 1) and Abell 69, and Blue Luminous Variable P Cygni in Cygnus
http://www.capella-observatory.com/Imag ... ndPCyg.htm
Copyright: Josef Pöpsel, Max Pöpsel, Stefan Binnewies, Frank Sackenheim


P Cygni (center) is a Blue Luminous Variable. Eta Carina also belongs to this class. While less bright than Eta Carina, P Cygni is still one of the most luminous stars in the galaxy.

Ju 1, the planetary best known as the Soap Bubble Nebula, is named after its discoverer Dave Jurasevich. It is seen at far right.

At top left is another planetary nebula, tiny and red Abell 69.

See a 931 KB version of the image and a crop of Abell 69 here and the full size version of the picture (5.54 MB) here.

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Re: Found Images: 2020 May

Post by starsurfer » Sat May 23, 2020 11:08 am

IC 1727
https://www.spacetelescope.org/images/potw1733a/
Copyright: ESA/Hubble & NASA
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AAS: BUFFALO Hunting with Hubble

Post by bystander » Sun May 24, 2020 12:41 am

BUFFALO Hunting with Hubble
AAS NOVA Featured Image | 2020 May 18
Susanna Kohler wrote:
apjsab75edf9_hr[1].jpg
Be sure to click on the image and enlarge it for the full view of the stunning, rich galaxy cluster Abell 370 (top right) and its surrounding area. This image was captured as part of the Beyond Ultra-deep Frontier Fields and Legacy Observations (BUFFALO) program, which is using 101 orbits of Hubble Space Telescope time to revisit the six Hubble Frontier Fields galaxy clusters and their flanking regions. Expanding on the Frontier Fields study, each set of BUFFALO images covers a region that’s four times larger than the previous coverage — the red-shaded section above shows the area that was previously imaged through Frontier Fields. BUFFALO’s wide, deep look will take advantage of gravitational lensing from these massive galaxy clusters to do two things: discover distant, high-redshift galaxies that lie behind the clusters, and study dark matter and galaxy assembly using the foreground clusters. For more information, check out the below article led by Charles L. Steinhardt (Cosmic Dawn Center (DAWN) and University of Copenhagen) that describes the study.

The BUFFALO HST Survey ~ Charles L. Steinhardt et al
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Re: Found Images: 2020 May

Post by SteveJ » Sun May 24, 2020 2:16 am

Ann wrote:
Tue May 19, 2020 8:03 pm
Comet SWAN
http://www.astrostudio.at/2_Bright%20Comets.php
Image and copyright: Gerald Rhemann.

That's a beautiful mosaic of C/2020 F8 SWAN. The dust tail shows twisting, suggesting rotation of the the nucleus.

Steve

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Re: Found Images: 2020 May

Post by starsurfer » Sun May 24, 2020 2:56 pm

ESO 510-13
https://astrodonimaging.com/gallery/eso510-g13-galaxy/
Copyright: Don Goldman
ESO510-G13.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2020 May

Post by starsurfer » Sun May 24, 2020 2:59 pm

WLM
http://www.chart32.de/index.php/component/k2/item/352
Copyright: CHART32
Processing: Bernd Flach-Wilken
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Re: Found Images: 2020 May

Post by Ann » Sun May 24, 2020 6:36 pm

Starburst in the core of NGC 5253
https://www.flickr.com/photos/54209675@N00/35954719554
Copyright: Hubble HRC, ACS/Judy Schmidt (Geckzilla)

Starburst in the core of NGC 5253 by Geck.png
Do visit Geck's Flickr page to read about this image.

Thanks, Geck, I think it's spectacular.

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Re: Found Images: 2020 May

Post by barretosmed » Sun May 24, 2020 7:58 pm

MY WORLD 🙂

BEST DETAILS:
https://www.astrobin.com/full/ucq77g/B/?nc=user

Equipment:
Canon 6D
Rokinon 14mm f2.4
Single 50 second frame
Iso 1600

Munhoz - MG - Brazil
05/21/2020

Copyright: Fernando Oliveira de Menezes
Email: Barretosmed@hotmail.com
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ESO: Southern Stargazing (LMC)

Post by bystander » Mon May 25, 2020 4:45 pm

Southern Stargazing
ESO Picture of the Week | 2020 May 25
Posing here under the splendours of the southern sky is Babak A. Tafreshi, one of ESO’s Photo Ambassadors. Babak is standing on part of the massive Miñiques volcanic complex, located in the Antofagasta region of Chile’s Atacama Desert. This region is also home to ESO’s Paranal Observatory, where the Very Large Telescope (VLT) gazes up at the sky, observing exotic phenomena such as gamma-ray bursts, extrasolar planets, and supermassive black holes.

Each of the VLT’s constituent telescopes can detect objects roughly four billion times fainter than the naked eye can see, giving it a far richer view of the Universe than is available to humans. However, the skies above the Atacama are some of the clearest and darkest in the world — so it’s little wonder that Babak stands in awe beneath it all.

The spectacular swirl of blue above Babak’s head is the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), a dwarf galaxy that orbits the Milky Way. It is part of the Local Group and is the third closest galaxy to us, lying approximately 163 000 light-years away. The LMC used to be classified as an irregular galaxy, but astronomers now think it was originally a barred spiral galaxy before its shape was distorted by the gravitational influence of the Milky Way and the nearby Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). A bridge of gas filled with protostars connects the SMC to the LMC, providing evidence of tidal interactions between the two galaxies.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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HEIC: One Large Stellar Latte To Go (NGC 3895)

Post by bystander » Mon May 25, 2020 4:48 pm

One Large Stellar Latte To Go
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2020 May 25
Far away in the Ursa Major constellation is a swirling galaxy that would not look out of place on a coffee made by a starry-eyed barista. NGC 3895 is a barred spiral galaxy that was first spotted by William Herschel in 1790 and was later observed by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

Hubble's orbit high above the Earth's distorting atmosphere allows astronomers to make the very high resolution observations that are essential to opening new windows on planets, stars and galaxies — such as this beautiful view of NGC 3895. The telescope is positioned approximately 570 km above the ground, where it whirls around Earth at 28 000 kilometres per hour and takes 96 minutes to complete one orbit.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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Re: HEIC: One Large Stellar Latte To Go (NGC 3895)

Post by Ann » Mon May 25, 2020 5:25 pm

bystander wrote:
Mon May 25, 2020 4:48 pm
One Large Stellar Latte To Go
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2020 May 25
Far away in the Ursa Major constellation is a swirling galaxy that would not look out of place on a coffee made by a starry-eyed barista. NGC 3895 is a barred spiral galaxy that was first spotted by William Herschel in 1790 and was later observed by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

Hubble's orbit high above the Earth's distorting atmosphere allows astronomers to make the very high resolution observations that are essential to opening new windows on planets, stars and galaxies — such as this beautiful view of NGC 3895. The telescope is positioned approximately 570 km above the ground, where it whirls around Earth at 28 000 kilometres per hour and takes 96 minutes to complete one orbit.
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
When you pour cream into coffee, then at first you get some interesting patterns. If you stir the coffee in one direction, you might create a swirling spiral shape.

I agree that galaxy NGC 3895 looks like cosmic latte.

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Re: HEIC: One Large Stellar Latte To Go (NGC 3895)

Post by starsurfer » Tue May 26, 2020 12:50 pm

Ann wrote:
Mon May 25, 2020 5:25 pm
bystander wrote:
Mon May 25, 2020 4:48 pm
One Large Stellar Latte To Go
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2020 May 25
Far away in the Ursa Major constellation is a swirling galaxy that would not look out of place on a coffee made by a starry-eyed barista. NGC 3895 is a barred spiral galaxy that was first spotted by William Herschel in 1790 and was later observed by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope.

Hubble's orbit high above the Earth's distorting atmosphere allows astronomers to make the very high resolution observations that are essential to opening new windows on planets, stars and galaxies — such as this beautiful view of NGC 3895. The telescope is positioned approximately 570 km above the ground, where it whirls around Earth at 28 000 kilometres per hour and takes 96 minutes to complete one orbit.
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
When you pour cream into coffee, then at first you get some interesting patterns. If you stir the coffee in one direction, you might create a swirling spiral shape.

I agree that galaxy NGC 3895 looks like cosmic latte.

Ann
There is a Coffee Bean Nebula! :D :lol2:

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Re: Found Images: 2020 May

Post by starsurfer » Tue May 26, 2020 12:54 pm

M35 and NGC 2158
http://deeplook.astronomie.at/messier%2035%20mizar.htm
Copyright: Markus Blauensteiner
M35.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2020 May

Post by starsurfer » Tue May 26, 2020 12:57 pm

M81 and M82
https://www.astrobin.com/wa3fx7/
Copyright: Jason Guenzel
TVY68fbUKQn7_1824x0_sWXLOnwG.jpg
Also includes NGC 3077, the forgotten third member of the band! :D
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Re: Found Images: 2020 May

Post by starsurfer » Tue May 26, 2020 12:58 pm

IC 1795
https://www.astrobin.com/0cy2eo/B/
Copyright: Emil Andronic
loDcPl5S23wk_1824x0_xTjz_rdB.jpg
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