Found Images: 2022 January

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bystander
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Found Images: 2022 January

Post by bystander » Sat Jan 01, 2022 2:42 pm


Have you seen a great image or video somewhere that you think would make a great APOD? Nominate it for APOD! Please post as much information here as you have about the image/video with a link to any source(s) for it you know of here, and the editors will take a look.

When posting the image itself, please do not post anything larger than a thumbnail here; please honor the copyright holder's copyright.

Please keep hotlinked images under 500K.

Thank you!

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starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2022 January

Post by starsurfer » Sat Jan 01, 2022 10:14 pm

NGC 6744
https://esahubble.org/images/potw1830a/
Copyright: ESA/Hubble & NASA
Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt
potw1830a.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 January

Post by starsurfer » Sat Jan 01, 2022 10:16 pm

LBN 691
http://www.astrosurf.com/ilizaso/orriak ... Q_U16m.htm
Copyright: Iñaki Lizaso
LBN691.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 January

Post by Ann » Mon Jan 03, 2022 5:36 pm

NGC 105
https://esahubble.org/images/potw2201a/
Copyright: ESA/Hubble & NASA, D. Jones, A. Riess et al.
Acknowledgement: R. Colombari
ESA/Hubble & NASA wrote:

This image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope captures the spiral galaxy NGC 105, which lies roughly 215 million light-years away in the constellation Pisces. While it looks like NGC 105 is plunging edge-on into a collision with a neighbouring galaxy, this is just the result of the chance alignment of the two objects in the night sky. NGC 105’s elongated neighbour is actually far more distant and remains relatively unknown to astronomers. These misleading conjunctions occur frequently in astronomy — for example, the stars in constellations are at vastly different distances from Earth, and only appear to form patterns thanks to the chance alignment of their component stars.
We may note that if the elongated galaxy is far in the background, it must be rather big. But its yellow center, which hardly seems to bulge at all, is rather small. By contrast, some of its regions of star formation are huge and very bright.

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starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2022 January

Post by starsurfer » Mon Jan 03, 2022 10:59 pm

Keyhole Nebula
https://www.hansonastronomy.com/keyhole-nebula
Data: El Sauce
Processing: Mark Hanson
KeyHole.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 January

Post by starsurfer » Mon Jan 03, 2022 11:01 pm

Abell 72
https://telescopius.com/pictures/view/7 ... oris_us5wu
Copyright: Boris Chausov
a2e11cc393e357099dc371e91c107f85.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 January

Post by starsurfer » Mon Jan 03, 2022 11:05 pm

MoMi 4
https://www.astrobin.com/5x16uy/
Data: Peter Goodhew
Processing: Utkarsh Mishra
uVzGMMmMLvr0_1824x0_n1wMX-gx.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 January

Post by starsurfer » Mon Jan 03, 2022 11:07 pm

Fe 6
https://www.astrobin.com/2w31w2/
Copyright: Douglas J. Struble
SxK5IlU5JQO9_1824x0_n1wMX-gx.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 January

Post by starsurfer » Mon Jan 03, 2022 11:12 pm

M33
http://outters.fr/wp/?p=9377
Copyright: Nicolas Outters
m33.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 January

Post by starsurfer » Sat Jan 08, 2022 11:13 pm


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Re: Found Images: 2022 January

Post by starsurfer » Sat Jan 08, 2022 11:18 pm

RCW 105
http://www.atacama-photographic-observa ... php?id=119
Copyright: Thierry Demange, Richard Galli and Thomas Petit
RCW105.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 January

Post by starsurfer » Sat Jan 08, 2022 11:24 pm

Dark Tower
http://www.cielaustral.com/galerie/photo100.htm
Copyright: Ciel Austral
photo100.jpg
photo100f.jpg
Click to view full size image 1 or image 2
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Re: Found Images: 2022 January

Post by barretosmed » Sun Jan 09, 2022 3:17 am

The Wild Duck Cluster (Messier 11, NGC 6705)

The Wild Duck Cluster (Messier 11, NGC 6705)

The Wild Duck Cluster (Messier 11, NGC 6705) is an open cluster of stars in the constellation Shield, which I have characteristically rich in blue stars.

BEST DETAILS:
https://www.astrobin.com/full/2oigy2/0/

EQUIPMENT:
ZWO ASI 6200MC COLED
Esprit 150mm
CEM60 mount
67 x 100''

10/08/2021
Location: Jales - SP - Brazil

Author: Fernando Oliveira de Menezes
(Organizing author of the book Astrofotografia Amadora no Brasil
https://clubedeautores.com.br/livro/ast ... -no-brasil )
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ESO: A Cosmic Caramel Swirl (NGC 1300)

Post by bystander » Mon Jan 10, 2022 6:35 pm

A Cosmic Caramel Swirl
ESO Picture of the Week | 2022 Jan 10
This picture of the week looks almost good enough to eat! However, despite its resemblance to a mouthwatering caramel swirl it is in fact an image of the NGC 1300 galaxy, located approximately 61 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Eridanus. NGC 1300 is a spiral galaxy, with a bar of stars and gas –– seen here crossing the image horizontally –– and a central ring of intense star formation.

The image is a combination of observations conducted at different colours –– or wavelengths –– of light. The golden caramel glow corresponds to clouds of molecular gas, the raw material out of which stars form. These data were taken with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), in which ESO is a partner. The bluish regions in the background reveal the distribution of slightly older, already formed stars, imaged by the Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) on ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT).

The images were taken as part of the Physics at High Angular resolution in Nearby GalaxieS (PHANGS) project, which is making high-resolution observations of nearby galaxies with telescopes operating across all wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum. Different wavelengths can reveal a multitude of secrets about a galaxy, and by comparing them astronomers are able to study what activates, boosts or hinders the birth of new stars.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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ESA: Galactic Tranquility (NGC 976)

Post by bystander » Mon Jan 10, 2022 6:41 pm

Galactic Tranquility
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2022 Jan 10
The lazily winding spiral arms of the spectacular galaxy NGC 976 fill the frame of this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. This spiral galaxy lies around 150 million light-years from the Milky Way in the constellation Aries. Despite its tranquil appearance, NGC 976 has played host to one of the most violent astronomical phenomena known — a supernova explosion. These cataclysmicly violent events take place at the end of the lives of massive stars, and can outshine entire galaxies for a short period. While supernovae mark the deaths of massive stars, they are also responsible for the creation of heavy elements that are incorporated into later generations of stars and planets.

Supernovae are also a useful aid for astronomers who measure the distances to faraway galaxies. The amount of energy thrown out into space by supernova explosions is very uniform, allowing astronomers to estimate their distances from how bright they appear to be when viewed from Earth. This image — which was created using data from Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 — comes from a large collection of Hubble observations of nearby galaxies which host supernovae as well as a pulsating class of stars known as Cepheid variables. Both Cepheids and supernovae are used to measure astronomical distances, and galaxies containing both objects provide useful natural laboratories where the two methods can be calibrated against one another.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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Re: Found Images: 2022 January

Post by starsurfer » Thu Jan 13, 2022 3:25 pm

NGC 247
https://www.astrobin.com/p1vy9p/
Copyright: Casey Good
gij_vXTaDhfo_1824x0_n1wMX-gx.jpg
The group of galaxies near the left is known as Burbidge's Chain.
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Re: Found Images: 2022 January

Post by starsurfer » Thu Jan 13, 2022 3:27 pm

Helix Galaxy (NGC 2685)
https://delsaert.com/2022/01/04/ngc-268 ... ix-galaxy/
Copyright: Bart Delsaert
ngc2685.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 January

Post by starsurfer » Thu Jan 13, 2022 3:28 pm

M61
https://www.astrobin.com/im7agy/
Copyright: Jerry Macon
jzy2tZLkvy8f_1824x0_n1wMX-gx.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 January

Post by starsurfer » Thu Jan 13, 2022 3:30 pm

M33
https://www.astrobin.com/4ajj3y/B/
Copyright: Chris Sullivan
Df1t-HViegWT_1824x0_2TnlqLMC.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 January

Post by starsurfer » Sun Jan 16, 2022 11:16 pm

NGC 2170
https://noirlab.edu/public/images/iotw2048a/
Copyright: CTIO/NOIRLab/NSF/AURA
Acknowledgment: Travis Rector (University of Alaska Anchorage), Mahdi Zamani & Davide de Martin

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Re: Found Images: 2022 January

Post by starsurfer » Sun Jan 16, 2022 11:21 pm

Sh2-132
http://www.capella-observatory.com/Imag ... h2-132.htm
Copyright: Josef Pöpsel, Frank Sackenheim and Stefan Binnewies
Sh2-132.jpg
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ESO: A Silent Sentinel (VST)

Post by bystander » Mon Jan 17, 2022 3:48 pm

A Silent Sentinel (VST)
ESO Picture of the Week | 2022 Jan 17
potw2203a[1].jpg
Image Credit: ESO/M. Zamani
Like a silent sentinel, ESO’s VLT Survey Telescope (VST) stands under the scattered stars of the Milky Way in this ethereal Picture of the Week.

The VST, which recently celebrated its 10th birthday, is located at ESO’s Paranal Observatory along with its namesake, the Very Large Telescope (VLT). However, the VST serves a very different purpose to the VLT. Rather than scrutinising small patches of the sky in great detail, it constantly scans much wider areas of the sky, mapping and cataloging celestial sources ranging from nearby stars to distant galaxies.

ESO’s Paranal Observatory, in Chile’s Atacama Desert, is an ideal location to carry out ground-based astronomy. It boasts over 300 clear nights per year and its remote location, far from light pollution, gives rise to skies that are dark enough to see the Milky Way in the stunning detail captured in this image.
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Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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ESA: Sail of Stars (NGC 3318)

Post by bystander » Mon Jan 17, 2022 3:58 pm

Sail of Stars
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2022 Jan 17
The spiral arms of the galaxy NGC 3318 are lazily draped across this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. This spiral galaxy lies in the constellation Vela and is roughly 115 million light-years away from Earth. Vela was originally part of a far larger constellation, known as Argo Navis after the fabled ship Argo from Greek mythology, but this unwieldy constellation proved to be impractically large. Argo Navis was split into three separate parts called Carina, Puppis, and Vela — each named after part of the Argo. As befits a galaxy in a nautically inspired constellation, the outer edges of NGC 3318 almost resemble a ship’s sails billowing in a gentle breeze.

Despite its placid appearance, NGC 3318 has played host to a spectacularly violent astronomical phenomenon, a titanic supernova first detected by an amateur astronomer in 2000. Thanks to NGC 3318’s distance from Earth, the original supernova must have taken place in or around 1885. Coincidentally, this was the year in which the only supernova ever to be detected in our neighbouring galaxy Andromeda was witnessed by 19th-century astronomers.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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Re: ESA: Sail of Stars (NGC 3318)

Post by Ann » Mon Jan 17, 2022 4:24 pm

bystander wrote: Mon Jan 17, 2022 3:58 pm Sail of Stars
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2022 Jan 17
The spiral arms of the galaxy NGC 3318 are lazily draped across this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. This spiral galaxy lies in the constellation Vela and is roughly 115 light-years away from Earth.

Despite its placid appearance, NGC 3318 has played host to a spectacularly violent astronomical phenomenon, a titanic supernova first detected by an amateur astronomer in 2000. Thanks to NGC 3318’s distance from Earth, the original supernova must have taken place in or around 1885. Coincidentally, this was the year in which the only supernova ever to be detected in our neighbouring galaxy Andromeda was witnessed by 19th-century astronomers.
Is this a joke? Who proofread this blurb?
Sci News wrote:
NGC 3318 is located approximately 115 million light-years away in the southern constellation of Vela.
But Sci News also insists that the supernova that was seen in the year 2000 in a galaxy 115 million light-years away must have occurred "in real time" in 1885.

Is this a joke? So if we detect a supernova tomorrow in a galaxy that is about a billion light-years away, then the supernova in that galaxy exploded at about the same time as the Crab Nebula progenitor?

Please explain to me how that works!!!

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Re: Found Images: 2022 January

Post by blastrophoto » Mon Jan 17, 2022 6:22 pm

The Pac-Man Nebula (NGC281) The eye-catching shapes looming in this portrait of NGC 281 are sculpted dusty columns and dense Bok globules seen in silhouette, eroded by intense, energetic winds and radiation from the hot cluster stars. If they survive long enough, the dusty structures could also be sites of future star formation. Playfully called the Pacman Nebula because of its overall shape, NGC 281 is about 10,000 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia. This sharp image was made through narrow-band filters. It combines emission from the nebula's hydrogen, sulpher, and oxygen atoms to synthesize red, green, and blue colors. The scene spans well over 80 light-years at the estimated distance of NGC 281.

Gear Used for Capture:
Telescope - Explore Scientific ED127 FCD100
Camera - QHY 294-M PRO
Filters - Astronomik SII, HA, OIII 12nm 2"
Mount - Skywatcher EQ6-R Pro
Field Flattener - Hotec 2" SCA Field Flattener

Processing performed in Pixinsight, Photoshop, and Topaz Denoise

Integration:
SII - 6.5 hours
HA - 8 hours
OIII - 6 hours

Captured from my suburban backyard in Virginia, US.