In praise of the ISS

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MargaritaMc
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In praise of the ISS

Post by MargaritaMc » Mon Jan 13, 2014 10:57 am

I don't think that there is an existing thread about the International Space Station, and I think it would be good to have one.

I like keeping up with what's going on up there and not just take them for granted. There are some very brave and resourceful people crewing the ISS!

So here is some ISS recent news if you're interested:

http://www.newsdaily.com/article/5e2958 ... ce-station

http://www.newsdaily.com/article/12d286 ... ce-station

The reason there was the delay:
http://www.newsdaily.com/article/00a0de ... -to-dec-24

http://www.newsdaily.com/article/1753e2 ... water-leak

M
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: In praise of the ISS

Post by Chris Peterson » Mon Jan 13, 2014 3:28 pm

I'm afraid all I see in the ISS is a massive money sink (thankfully the Shuttle component of that sink is now shut down). I think about the huge amount of real science that could have been accomplished with the resources diverted towards those programs.

I we learn anything from the ISS, it should be the folly of something like a manned mission to Mars, which like the ISS would likely turn into a multi-billion dollar program in toilet and air conditioner repair.
Chris

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Re: In praise of the ISS

Post by neufer » Mon Jan 13, 2014 3:50 pm

Chris Peterson wrote:
I'm afraid all I see in the ISS is a massive money sink (thankfully the Shuttle component of that sink is now shut down). I think about the huge amount of real science that could have been accomplished with the resources diverted towards those programs.
As if ISS money will ever be diverted towards science programs after the station is deorbited.
Chris Peterson wrote:
I we learn anything from the ISS, it should be the folly of something like a manned mission to Mars, which like the ISS would likely turn into a multi-billion dollar program in toilet and air conditioner repair.
The carrot of a manned mission to Mars tomorrow allows us to send Spirit, Opportunity & Curiosity to Mars today.

And future Chinese manned missions to the moon & Mars are our best hope for reviving NASA generally.
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Chris Peterson
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Re: In praise of the ISS

Post by Chris Peterson » Mon Jan 13, 2014 4:01 pm

neufer wrote:As if ISS money will ever be diverted towards science programs after the station is deorbited.
All of it? Almost certainly not. But there's a certain amount of money available for space science, and I have little doubt that without the ISS more would be applied to actual research than is currently being done.
The carrot of a manned mission to Mars tomorrow allows us to send Spirit, Opportunity & Curiosity to Mars today.
An interesting hypothesis, but I'm not convinced.
And future Chinese manned missions to the moon & Mars are our best hope for reviving NASA generally.
I wouldn't use the term "revived", because NASA has some very strong programs right now. But I take your point.
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Re: In praise of the ISS

Post by Nitpicker » Tue Jan 14, 2014 3:05 am

The following article gives a pretty comprehensive look at the range of scientific experiments conducted on the ISS:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scientific ... ce_Station

Many of these experiments would have never been performed, were it not for the humans on board the ISS. It is certainly true that there is plenty of science which can be done without humans in space. But I don't see it as one or the other, but both, given enough time and enough will. I choose to praise the ISS and everyone involved in making it happen. It is perhaps easier for me to say this, given that none of my taxes go towards the ISS, but taxes are only ever spent with great efficiency in parallel universes.

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Re: In praise of the ISS

Post by geckzilla » Tue Jan 14, 2014 3:21 am

After Skylab fell, I guess Australia got a little shy about space stations. ;)
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Re: In praise of the ISS

Post by Nitpicker » Tue Jan 14, 2014 3:37 am

geckzilla wrote:After Skylab fell, I guess Australia got a little shy about space stations. ;)
Not that Australia ever put any money into Skylab, either. Karma, man!

Interesting blurb here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skylab#Re-entry

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Re: In praise of the ISS

Post by MargaritaMc » Thu Jan 16, 2014 9:10 pm

NASA/Johnson Space Center: Space station MAXI-mizing our understanding of the universe

Look up at the night sky ... do you see it? The stars of the cosmos bursting in magnificent explosions of death and rebirth! No? Well, then maybe you are not looking through the "eyes" of the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) investigation, mounted on the exterior of the International Space Station Kibo module. MAXI, along with other sky watching instruments, such as Swift, collect data that help researchers discover, study and understand the physics behind the powerful lifecycle of our universe. MAXI was key in two recent publications sharing results that make strides in advancing astrophysics.

Using this collection of instruments, researchers look at snapshots of a celestial dance that took place long ago. These explosive moments and their aftermath happened millions and even billions of years ago, but were only visible recently due to their distance from Earth. The events have something to teach about our past and our future, as we have our own star to be mindful of—the sun.

MAXI is operated by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and has open access to the space environment. This allows the investigation's sensors to perform an entire sky scan once every orbit of the space station around Earth—there are 16 orbits per day. The information from the sky scans downlink to a data center at the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), a Japanese research institution where the MAXI team disseminates data to scientists around the globe for study.

Read more at
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/ ... 011514.php
M
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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The Coolest Spot in the Universe

Post by MargaritaMc » Fri Jan 31, 2014 7:37 pm

Click to play embedded YouTube video.
ScienceCasts: The Coolest Spot in the Universe
Uploaded on 30 Jan 2014
NASA researchers plan to create the coldest spot in the known Universe--inside the International Space Station. The device, known as the Cold Atom Lab, could discover new forms of matter and novel quantum phenomena.

Visit http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/sc ... _coldspot/ for more.
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: In praise of the ISS

Post by Beyond » Fri Jan 31, 2014 8:01 pm

I just saw that video about an hour ago. But it was in a NASA setting with other videos that play one after the other.
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ScienceCasts: 10 More Years

Post by MargaritaMc » Fri Feb 14, 2014 8:00 pm

Click to play embedded YouTube video.
ScienceCasts: 10 More Years
ScienceAtNASA

Uploaded on 13 Feb 2014

With the space station no longer "under construction," the world's most advanced orbital laboratory is open for business. The station has just received a 10-year extension from NASA, giving researchers the time they need to take full advantage of its unique capabilities.
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Tackling tumors with space station research

Post by MargaritaMc » Sat Mar 01, 2014 2:41 pm

NASA/Johnson Space Center:
Tackling tumors with space station research


In space, things don't always behave the way we expect them to. In the case of cancer, researchers have found that this is a good thing: some tumors seem to be much less aggressive in the microgravity environment of space compared to their behavior on Earth. This observation, reported in research published in February by the FASEB Journal, could help scientists understand the mechanism involved and develop drugs targeting tumors that don't respond to current treatments. This work is the latest in a large body of evidence on how space exploration benefits those of us on Earth.
This article draws on research done on the Chinese Shenzou-8 space station in collaboration with the German space agency and notes that follow up research is planned on the ISS.
...a Nanoracks Cellbox investigation called "Effect of microgravity on human thyroid carcinoma cells," scheduled to launch in March on SpaceX's third commercial resupply mission to the International Space Station. Another follow-up investigation, "Spheroids," is planned in 2015. The overall goal is to find as many genes and proteins as possible that are affected by microgravity and to identify the cellular activities they influence. Researchers can then use this information to develop new strategies for cancer research. ...
http://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/ ... 022814.php
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: In praise of the ISS

Post by MargaritaMc » Sun Mar 09, 2014 9:25 pm

NASA Launches New Research, Seeks the Subtle in Parallel Ways
Image

On March 7, NASA announced the selection of 10 investigations for the study of identical twin astronauts Scott and Mark Kelly and, in doing so, launched human space life science research into a new era
. Although NASA’s Human Research Program has been researching the effects of spaceflight on the human body for decades, these 10 investigations will provide NASA with broader insight into the subtle effects and changes that may occur in spaceflight as compared to Earth-based environments. NASA and the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI) will jointly manage this ambitious new undertaking.
“We realized this is a unique opportunity to perform a class of novel studies because we had one twin flying aboard the International Space Station and one twin on the ground,” says Craig Kundrot, Ph.D. and deputy chief scientist of NASA’s Human Research Program. “We can study two individuals who have the same genetics, but are in different environments for one year.”
Read more here at the NASA Space Station web page
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
NASA HRP Twins Research Study with Craig Kundrot
NASAgovVideo
Uploaded on 7 Mar 2014
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: In praise of the ISS

Post by MargaritaMc » Wed Mar 19, 2014 7:37 pm

New Scientist: Space diaries reveal 6 things on an astronaut's mind
11 March, 2014

While you are in space, could you keep a diary?


That is the unusual request that Jack Stuster of Anacapa Sciences in Santa Barbara, California, has been making of NASA astronauts for the last decade.
...
As well as helping with the design of future missions, the diaries provide a unique glimpse into the joys and frustrations of life in space. We combed through the snippets published so far – all written by astronauts onboard the International Space Station between 2003 and 2010 – and, grouping our favourite quotes according to their content, found that six clear themes emerged.
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: In praise of the ISS

Post by MargaritaMc » Mon Apr 28, 2014 2:35 pm

NASA Science News for April 28, 2014 (email newsletter)

A new lifeform is taking root on the International Space Station, and its name is "Outregeous." The space-faring lettuce was delivered to the space station by a SpaceX Dragon capsule on April 20th.
FULL STORY: http://science.nasa.gov/science-news/sc ... r_lettuce/
VIDEO:
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: In praise of the ISS

Post by MargaritaMc » Mon May 19, 2014 2:26 pm

Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Chris Hadfield message for Alexander Gerst

European Space Agency, ESA

Uploaded on 16 May 2014

A video greeting and best wishes to ESA's Alexander Gerst from one of Canada's most well-known astronauts, Chris Hadfield. Alexander is set to launch to the ISS with the Expedition 40/41 crew on 28 May 2014 for a five-and-a-half-month science mission. Chris, now retired, completed three spaceflights and in 2001 became the first Canadian to walk in space. He served as ISS Commander during his final mission in 2013.
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: In praise of the ISS

Post by MargaritaMc » Mon May 19, 2014 2:33 pm

Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Alexander Gerst: Mission to the ISS

European Space Agency, ESA

Uploaded on 16 May 2014
ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst from Germany is the second of ESA's new generation of astronauts scheduled to fly into space.

He'll be launching on 28 May from Baikonur in a Russian Soyuz capsule with two fellow crew members for a long-duration stay onboard the International Space Station.

... He will serve as a flight engineer for Expeditions 40 and 41. His comprehensive research programme will include a wide variety of European and international science experiments.
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: In praise of the ISS

Post by MargaritaMc » Fri Jun 13, 2014 11:58 am

"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: In praise of the ISS

Post by neufer » Fri Jun 13, 2014 12:58 pm

Art Neuendorffer

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Re: In praise of the ISS

Post by MargaritaMc » Thu Jun 26, 2014 3:16 pm

Click to play embedded YouTube video.

Space gooooooaaaal

European Space Agency, ESA


Uploaded on Jun 26, 2014

In true World Cup spirit ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst and NASA astronauts Reid Wiseman and Steve Swanson play a friendly game of football, celebrating their goals as only they can while living in the International Space Station.

Recorded during their time-off over the weekend the astronaut-footballers enjoyed some weightless football fun.

During Alexander's six-month Blue Dot mission on the Space Station he will run over 100 experiments that cannot be done anywhere else on Earth - just like these celebrations.
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: In praise of the ISS

Post by geckzilla » Thu Jun 26, 2014 3:21 pm

Oh man, they are having way too much fun.
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Re: In praise of the ISS

Post by MargaritaMc » Fri Aug 08, 2014 4:10 pm

geckzilla wrote:Oh man, they are having way too much fun.
:wink: This is more serious!
ESA-Our Activities
GERST DRIVES CAR-SIZED ROVER FROM SPACE
8 August 2014
Looking down from orbit, ESA astronaut Alexander Gerst steered ESA’s Eurobot rover through a series of intricate manoeuvres on the ground yesterday, demonstrating a new space network that could connect astronauts to vehicles on alien worlds.
During an intense 90-minute live link on 7 August, Alex used a dedicated controller laptop on the International Space Station to operate Eurobot, relying on video and data feedback to feed commands from 400 km up, orbiting at 28 000 km/h.
...
There's a short video embedded in which one can see that the rover has a little green fluffy toy on it, but they don't mention it in the news release! It's not the usual ESA mascot. As ever, I'm intrigued - it looks so sweet!

M
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: In praise of the ISS

Post by MargaritaMc » Fri Sep 26, 2014 5:35 pm

"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: In praise of the ISS

Post by MargaritaMc » Fri Nov 21, 2014 4:32 pm

I found this video very interesting, especially footage inside the Soyuz spacecraft.

ESA: ISS and Soyuz transfer and docking explained

It is the second of a series of three. Links to the other two are on the URL page above, but I haven't watched them yet.
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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The Answer is Expedition 42!

Post by MargaritaMc » Tue Nov 25, 2014 2:32 pm

I think that this is a wonderful poster from NASA! Which I've only just found, tho it was published back in September.
info from Universe Today

Featuring (from left to right):

Terry Virts and Anton Shkaplerov as Zaphod Beeblebrox
Aleksandr Samokutyayev as Humma Kavula
Barry “Butch” Wilmore as Arthur Dent
Elena Serova as Ford Prefect
Samantha Cristoforetti as Trillian

Guest star: Robonaut, as Marvin the Paranoid Android

Samantha Cristoforetti posted this image on her Flickr page and said the family of Douglas Adams gave the crew permission to do the photo-shoot for this poster, and added that the Point-of-View gun is not Photoshopped, but a real creation.
This is a more standard image of the crew! More info about them at the NASA ISS site
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS