APOD: The Antikythera Mechanism (2021 Mar 21)

Comments and questions about the APOD on the main view screen.
RocketRon

Re: APOD: The Antikythera Mechanism (2021 Mar 21)

Post by RocketRon » Thu Apr 22, 2021 12:16 am

The handful of surviving unaltered Anglo Saxon stone built churches in Britain are little more than modest stone barns.
To compare them to the great Romanesque churches in Europe is just laughable.

And parishes would have had to have been wealthy to afford even this, and to find the stonemasons.
(A skill lost in Britain post the Romans.) That was not Anglo Saxons at all !

Those vast soaring Gothic arches of the Monasteries were 12th Century and later. Thats what Gothic is.
And monasteries would have had to have been immensely wealthy to afford this. Definitely not the Anglo Saxons !!

RocketRon

Re: APOD: The Antikythera Mechanism (2021 Mar 21)

Post by RocketRon » Thu Apr 22, 2021 12:19 am

Perhaps we should also return to the main topic here - The Antikythera Mechanism.

When archaeology turned this up, all knowledge of them would seem to have been lost, long lost.
Not a word in print anywhere. Definitely lost knowledge. ?

________________________________________________________________________
This forum seems somewhat flaky, goes offline to posting replies for days at a time ?

RocketRon

Re: APOD: The Antikythera Mechanism (2021 Mar 21)

Post by RocketRon » Thu Apr 22, 2021 12:37 am

Perhaps we should also detail that the Anglo Saxons did build many a church in timber.
Something as a building material they were quite familiar with - its possible that every
reasonably sized village had one - but all that remain are post hole marks in the ground.

One has survived though, although much altered, to show how they did it in timber.
Curious that it is dated post the Normans - the AngloSaxons did not just go away after then ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greensted_Church
You'd have to imagine that the tiled roof has replaced the thatch at some point ?
https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/ ... h-west.JPG

We diverge from Antikythera mechanisms, muchly ...

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Re: APOD: The Antikythera Mechanism (2021 Mar 21)

Post by neufer » Thu Apr 22, 2021 1:58 am

Click to play embedded YouTube video.
RocketRon wrote:
Thu Apr 22, 2021 12:19 am


Perhaps we should also return to the main topic here - The Antikythera Mechanism When archaeology turned this up, all knowledge of them would seem to have been lost, long lost. Not a word in print anywhere. Definitely lost knowledge?
Soon after the Antikythera mechanism 70–60 BC shipwreck, the Antikythera App was destroyed in the 48 BC burning of the Great Library of Alexandria fire.
Art Neuendorffer

RocketRon

Re: APOD: The Antikythera Mechanism (2021 Mar 21)

Post by RocketRon » Thu Apr 22, 2021 2:46 am

That may have been mentioned earlier !
You'd think that if every mariner had one, they may have had a wider knowledge base ?

Makes you wonder what else was about back then.
Clock mechanisms ??

RocketRon

Re: APOD: The Antikythera Mechanism (2021 Mar 21)

Post by RocketRon » Thu Apr 22, 2021 2:48 am

The fire ..

Interesting little video, thanks for the link.
Certainly food for thought.

RocketRon

Re: APOD: The Antikythera Mechanism (2021 Mar 21)

Post by RocketRon » Fri Apr 23, 2021 9:42 pm

I'm a bit surprised that an astrolabe didn't get a mention here.

This one in an Oxford museum (?) is described as a medieval navigation instrument.
Image

You can still buy all sorts of designs and layouts as decorative items and clocks even.
Maybe the knowledge has survived/been revived ?

RocketRon

Re: APOD: The Antikythera Mechanism (2021 Mar 21)

Post by RocketRon » Fri Apr 23, 2021 11:13 pm

Or the latest in imported Arabic navigation equipment, converted into English.

https://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/BL0AAOSw ... -l1600.jpg

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Re: APOD: The Antikythera Mechanism (2021 Mar 21)

Post by skyimagelab » Sat May 08, 2021 6:30 pm

RocketRon wrote:
Fri Apr 23, 2021 9:42 pm
I'm a bit surprised that an astrolabe didn't get a mention here.

This one in an Oxford museum (?) is described as a medieval navigation instrument.
Image

You can still buy all sorts of designs and layouts as decorative items and clocks even.
Maybe the knowledge has survived/been revived ?
This is beautiful thanks for posting