Submission: 2019 January

See new, spectacular, or mysterious sky images.
Jean-Baptiste Auroux
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Re: Submission: 2019 January

Post by Jean-Baptiste Auroux » Sun Jan 06, 2019 1:32 pm

Cometary Globula CG4
Full version : https://cdn.astrobin.com/thumbs/JamOs-9 ... hqkGbg.jpg

Discovered in 1976 by the Australian Astronomical Observatory, CG4 (Cometary Nebula 4) is a dark nebula located 1300 light-years away in the constellation Puppis.

It is part of a group of dark nebulae with a cometary aspect, located around the Gum Nebula, all of them pointing away from the Vela supernova remnant, in the center of the Gum nebula. Some astronomers consider that these Bok globules, originally spherical in shape, have been deformed by the shock wave of the supernova.

The "head" of the nebula is illuminated by the young stars born in its center and visible in this image. The nebula extends 8 light-years long, 1.5 light-years in diameter.

Some call this nebula "the hand of God", but personally I see there rather an immense sandworm of Arrakis, aka "Dune", leaping to swallow the small galaxy! :)

The galaxy in question, PGC 21338, is actually more than 100 million LY away. The galaxy at the bottom of the image, NGC2427, is 45 million LY away.

Setup : Newton ASA 500mm - FLI ProLine16803 - Astrodon filters - Chilescope remote facility
LRGB + Ha
Total integration : 12h40

Copyright: Jean-Baptiste Auroux - https://www.astrobin.com/users/Jean-Baptiste_Paris/

vanamonde81
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Re: Submission: 2019 January

Post by vanamonde81 » Mon Jan 07, 2019 5:49 am

The Statue of Miska the Hussar
Copyright: György Soponyai

Pákozd village was the location of one of the most important battle in the Hungarian Revolution of 1848, fought on 29th September 1848. The greatest part of the Hungarian victory was contributed by the Hussars.

Hussars were members of a class of light cavalry, originating in Hungary in the 15th century. This 12.5 meter tall statue erected near the battlefield holds memories of these soldiers.
As the battle was fought on the day of Saint Michael, the statue was christened to Miskahuszár. (Miska = Mike)

Image

2019.01.07. Pákozd, Hungary
Canon EOS 5D Mark II + Samyang EF 14/2.8
143 x 60 sec, ISO 1000, F 4.0

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moonrocks
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Re: Submission: 2019 January

Post by moonrocks » Mon Jan 07, 2019 11:08 am


markh@tds.net
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Re: Submission: 2019 January

Post by markh@tds.net » Mon Jan 07, 2019 3:38 pm

NGC 4214

Copyright: Mark Hanson
NGC4214NewAPODsmall.jpg
This data was taken back in 2012 from Animas, New Mexico using my old 14.5 RCOS telescope. I processed the data back then but decided to re-process it 6+years later. It's hard to believe it's the same data! Boy how much we learn over the years.

The dwarf galaxy NGC 4214 is ablaze with young stars and gas clouds. Located around 10 million light-years away in the constellation of Canes Venatici (The Hunting Dogs), the galaxy's close proximity, combined with the wide variety of evolutionary stages among the stars, make it an ideal laboratory to research the triggers of star formation and evolution.

You can see the older version and larger version here:
https://www.hansonastronomy.com/ngc-4214
Thank you,
Mark Hanson
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litobrit
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Tarantula HOO

Post by litobrit » Mon Jan 07, 2019 3:58 pm

Hello,
A HOO version of my previous picture.
Only 4 hours of Ha OIII.
The full is https://www.astrobin.com/full/384777/0/ ... real=&mod=

https://cdn.astrobin.com/thumbs/7zGY0ID ... hqkGbg.jpg
Last edited by bystander on Mon Jan 07, 2019 4:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Please no hotlinks to images > 500Kb

delberson
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Re: Submission: 2019 January

Post by delberson » Mon Jan 07, 2019 9:32 pm


delberson
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Re: Submission: 2019 January

Post by delberson » Tue Jan 08, 2019 3:06 am


alcarreño
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Orion and Barnard

Post by alcarreño » Tue Jan 08, 2019 5:46 pm

Copyrights :Raul Villaverde Fraile
ImageMosaico Orion 2018v2 by Raul Villaverde, en Flickr

lizarranet
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Re: Submission: 2019 January

Post by lizarranet » Tue Jan 08, 2019 11:31 pm

IC348 in Perseus

Copyright: Deep Sky Team (Mikel Martínez, Cedric Thomas, Marian Gutowski, Franck Jobard)

ImageIC348 by Mikel Martínez, en Flickr
Last edited by bystander on Wed Jan 09, 2019 5:30 am, edited 1 time in total.
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vendetta
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Re: Submission: 2019 January

Post by vendetta » Thu Jan 10, 2019 3:05 pm


vendetta
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Re: Submission: 2019 January

Post by vendetta » Thu Jan 10, 2019 3:06 pm


Maicon Germiniani
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Re: Submission: 2019 January

Post by Maicon Germiniani » Fri Jan 11, 2019 1:10 pm

Last edited by bystander on Fri Jan 11, 2019 3:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Please no hotlinks to images > 500Kb. Substituted smaller image.

avdhoeven
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Re: Submission: 2019 January

Post by avdhoeven » Sat Jan 12, 2019 10:45 pm


User avatar
Ann
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Re: Submission: 2019 January

Post by Ann » Sun Jan 13, 2019 9:55 am

avdhoeven wrote:
Sat Jan 12, 2019 10:45 pm
Image
Draco_triplet_CFHT-final-2018 by Andre van der Hoeven, on Flickr
That's a great picture! :shock: :D

Of course, I know that you are a great photographer, so I should not be surprised.

Ann
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kokehtz
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Re: Submission: 2019 January

Post by kokehtz » Sun Jan 13, 2019 6:29 pm

HorseHead Nebula, Flame Nebula, Alnitak and Alnilam.

Copyright: Álvaro Ibáñez Pérez
Website: www.aipastroimaging.com

Full resolution:
https://aipastroimaging.com/wp-content/ ... GB_AIP.jpg

Image
Telescopes: Takahashi FSQ106EDX. TS115 Triplet APO
Mounts: Takahashi EM400 Temma2. NEQ6 Pro II Belts
Camera: Atik 16200m + Atik 460EXm + Astrodon LRGB Gen2 E-Series + SX USB Filter Wheel
Guider: Lunático EZG60 + SXLodestar
Focuser: RoboFocus
AstroMatic + Polemaster

www.aipastroimaging.com

Kinch
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Re: Submission: 2019 January

Post by Kinch » Sun Jan 13, 2019 6:41 pm

Tadpole Nebula

ImageIC 410 Tadpole Nebula by Brendan Kinch, on Flickr

Full details and higher resolution @: http://www.kinchastro.com/ic-410-tadpoles.html

remidone
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Re: Submission: 2019 January

Post by remidone » Sun Jan 13, 2019 8:42 pm

NGC 7635 Bubble Nebula Narrowband
Copyright: Luca Moretti

sixburg
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Re: Submission: 2019 January

Post by sixburg » Sun Jan 13, 2019 9:23 pm

B33 @ DSW on TOA-150, ML16200, AP1600AE-L

Green: 39x600" bin 1x1
Luminance: 30x41" bin 1x1
41x60" bin 1x1
1x600" bin 1x1
B33 TOA150 DSWS LRGB Processed v1 - Small.jpg
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trobison
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Re: Submission: 2019 January

Post by trobison » Mon Jan 14, 2019 12:35 pm

NGC 2359 – Thors Helmet

Thor’s Helmet is a popular target for astrophotographers. We all love to find shapes, and this cosmic cloud certainly ticks many boxes with the wing like appendages on the helmet, to the spooky eyes looking back from some 12000 light years away. The object spans about 30 light years across, and is believed to be in a brief pre-supernova stage of evolution. At its centre, an extremely hot Wolf-Rayet star is located, WR7. This incredible looking stellar object is located in the constellation Canis Major.

I think the object resembles a spooky alien protecting his collection of shiny stellar marbles.

Exposure Details:
•Lum 65X900
•Red 40X450
•Green 16X450
•Blue 16X450
•Ha 32X1800
•OIII 25X1800
Total time 53.75 hours

Instruments Used:
•10 Inch RCOS fl 9.1
•Astro Physics AP-900 Mount
•SBIG STL 11000m
•FLI Filter Wheel
•Astrodon Lum, Red, Green, Blue Filters
•Baader Planetarium H-alpha 7nm Narrowband-Filter
•Baader Planetarium OIII 8.5nm Narrowband-Filter

Software Used

•CCDStack (calibration, alignment, data rejection, stacking)
•Photoshop CS 6 (Image processing)

Thanks for looking

Image

markh@tds.net
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Re: Submission: 2019 January

Post by markh@tds.net » Tue Jan 15, 2019 5:30 am

NGC 2655 - Arp 225
Copyright: Mark Hanson
NGC2782NewWebsmall.jpg

Full version and description can be seen here: https://www.hansonastronomy.com/ngc-2655


Description by Sakib Rasool

"Floating in the serenity of the universe like a cosmic ammonite shell, NGC 2655 is an impressive example of a lenticular galaxy. Located 60 million light years away towards the constellation of Camelopardalis, its series of outer shell structures and faint tidal loops are nicely complemented by internal dust lanes near its core.

Its panoply of morphological kinematics are indicative of a merger between two galaxies in the past, an intergalactic event that is now known to be a common feature of the evolution of galaxies. Other signatures of a past merger that aren't apparent to the eye are vast clouds of neutral hydrogen surrounding the galaxy that were uncovered in observations made using radio telescopes by professional astronomers.

The unusual appearance of NGC 2655 brought it to the attention of the famous astronomer Halton Arp who added it to his atlas of peculiar galaxies under Arp 225. Another distinction is that the core is very luminous, which means that NGC 2655 belongs to the category of active galaxies known as Seyfert galaxies, which were named after the astronomer Karl Seyfert. The luminosity of Seyfert galaxies is thought to derive from a transfer of matter onto an accretion disk around a supermassive black hole.

NGC 2655 is the brightest member of a small group of galaxies that also includes NGC 2715 (not visible in image). The diameter of NGC 2655 is approximately 200,000 light years but the envelope of neutral hydrogen gas discovered in the 1980's is about 500,000 light years."

Thank you,
Mark Hanson
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markh@tds.net
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Re: Submission: 2019 January

Post by markh@tds.net » Tue Jan 15, 2019 5:32 am

NGC 2782 - Re-processed version (data from 2012)
Copyright: Mark Hanson
NGC2782NewWebT.jpg
Full image can be seen here: https://www.hansonastronomy.com/ngc-2782
Taken from DGRO Rancho Hidalgo Animas, New Mexico
14.5" RCOS F8, Apogee U16M High Cooling
Luminance 360, Red 180, Green 140, Blue 180


The starburst galaxy NGC 2782 lies about 110 million light years away toward the Lynx constellation. This shows the result when two galaxies of unequal mass collided about 200 million years ago. Their gravitational pull ripped out two tails of debris with very different properties.

The optically bright eastern tail has some neutral hydrogen gas and molecular gas at the base of the tail, and an optically bright, but gas-poor concentration at the end of the tail. The optically faint western tail is rich in neutral hydrogen gas, but has no molecular gas, yet astronomers have recently found blue star clusters younger than 100 million years along both tails, indicating that those stars formed within both tails after the galaxy collision occurred.


Current star-formation theory suggests that star clusters are formed from the collapse of giant molecular gas clouds, but if this were the case, astronomers would expect to see remnants of the molecular gas which helped give birth to the stars in both of the tails of NGC 2782.

Finding unexpected young star clusters in the western tail could help explain why stars form in other places where there is little molecular gas, like the outer edges of the Milky Way galaxy or in the debris of other galaxy collisions.

Thank you,

Mark Hanson
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Ann
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Re: Submission: 2019 January

Post by Ann » Tue Jan 15, 2019 5:52 am

markh@tds.net wrote:
Tue Jan 15, 2019 5:32 am
NGC 2782 - Re-processed version (data from 2012)
Copyright: Mark Hanson

NGC2782NewWebT.jpg

Full image can be seen here: https://www.hansonastronomy.com/ngc-2782
Taken from DGRO Rancho Hidalgo Animas, New Mexico
14.5" RCOS F8, Apogee U16M High Cooling
Luminance 360, Red 180, Green 140, Blue 180


The starburst galaxy NGC 2782 lies about 110 million light years away toward the Lynx constellation. This shows the result when two galaxies of unequal mass collided about 200 million years ago. Their gravitational pull ripped out two tails of debris with very different properties.

The optically bright eastern tail has some neutral hydrogen gas and molecular gas at the base of the tail, and an optically bright, but gas-poor concentration at the end of the tail. The optically faint western tail is rich in neutral hydrogen gas, but has no molecular gas, yet astronomers have recently found blue star clusters younger than 100 million years along both tails, indicating that those stars formed within both tails after the galaxy collision occurred.


Current star-formation theory suggests that star clusters are formed from the collapse of giant molecular gas clouds, but if this were the case, astronomers would expect to see remnants of the molecular gas which helped give birth to the stars in both of the tails of NGC 2782.

Finding unexpected young star clusters in the western tail could help explain why stars form in other places where there is little molecular gas, like the outer edges of the Milky Way galaxy or in the debris of other galaxy collisions.

Thank you,

Mark Hanson
Thank you, Mark, this is one of my favorite weird galaxies! Thanks for the beautiful picture and the fascinating information! :D

Ann
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sydney
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Re: Submission: 2019 January

Post by sydney » Tue Jan 15, 2019 7:15 am

Lensed Quasar QSO957+561 and NGC3079

Nick Pavelchak
http://www.astrobin.com/283012/?nc=user
Pavelchak QSO_Small.jpg
From Wikipedia:
[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twin_Quasar]

"QSO 0957+561 A (SBS 0957+561 A) and QSO 0957+561 B (SBS 0957+561 B) are the two components of a double-imaged quasar, meaning that an intervening mass concentration between Earth and the quasar bends light so that two images of the quasar appear in the sky. This is known as gravitational lensing, and is a consequence of Einsteinian warped space-time. The quasar lies at redshift z = 1.41 (8.7 billion ly), while the lensing galaxy lies at redshift z = 0.355 (3.7 billion ly). The lensing galaxy with apparent dimension of 0.42×0.22 arcminutes lies almost in line with the B image, lying 1 arcsecond off. The quasar lies 10 arcminutes north of NGC 3079, in the constellation Ursa Major. The astronomical data services SIMBAD and NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED) list several other names for this system.

The Twin Quasar's two images are separated by 6 arcseconds. Both images have an apparent magnitude of 17, with the A component having 16.7 and the B component having 16.5. There is a 417 ± 3 day time lag between the two images.[2]"
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Kinch
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Re: Submission: 2019 January

Post by Kinch » Tue Jan 15, 2019 7:51 pm

M1 - Crab Nebula

ImageM1 Crab Nebula by Brendan Kinch, on Flickr

Full acquisition details @: http://www.kinchastro.com/m1-crab-nebula.html

mikiclinic
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Re: Submission: 2019 January

Post by mikiclinic » Wed Jan 16, 2019 4:57 pm

Gum Nebula
This image was taken through Narrow band filter Hα and O3.
Four images which was taken with 380mm Refractor and KAF50100 cooled CCD shows detailed mosaic image.
http://www.miki-hosp.or.jp/BIND
Copyright: NOBUHIKO MIKI