Found Images: 2022 May

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starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2022 May

Post by starsurfer » Mon May 16, 2022 10:33 pm

NGC 2438
https://www.astrobin.com/b8ewgz/
Copyright: Boris Chausov
SV8hgwQV2YIE_2560x0_n1wMX-gx.jpg
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starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2022 May

Post by starsurfer » Mon May 16, 2022 10:34 pm

IPHASX J022045.0+631134
https://pbase.com/jshuder/image/172554070
Copyright: Jim Shuder
172554070.2RpGD79r.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 May

Post by starsurfer » Wed May 18, 2022 10:34 pm

M74
https://www.astrobin.com/mk93zg/B/
Copyright: Tommy Nawratil
Fr8GG0HZkmvP_2560x0_n1wMX-gx.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 May

Post by starsurfer » Wed May 18, 2022 10:36 pm

NGC 289
https://www.flickr.com/photos/97807083@N00/49118776878/
Copyright: Terry Robison
49118776878_9b626c477a_k.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 May

Post by starsurfer » Wed May 18, 2022 10:38 pm

NGC 7769, NGC 7770 and NGC7771
https://www.flickr.com/photos/146686921 ... 046208993/
Copyright: Franz Klauser
49034815503_054403d99c.jpg
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NOIRLab: Total Lunar Eclipse over Cerro Tololo (CTIO)

Post by bystander » Thu May 19, 2022 2:20 am

Total Lunar Eclipse over Cerro Tololo
NOIRLab Image of the Week | 2022 May 18
A total lunar eclipse transformed the sky on the evening of 15 May 2022 and photographers at NOIRLab facilities in Arizona and Chile took advantage of clear skies to capture the event.

This week’s Image of the Week shows the eclipse as seen from Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO), a Program of NSF’s NOIRLab, near La Serena, Chile. The crimson Moon shines above the Milky Way in the center left of the image. At the bottom of the image are the Víctor M. Blanco 4-meter Telescope (center) and Curtis Schmidt Telescope (left). In the southern hemisphere, the eclipse appeared extraordinarily dark as a result of the ash from the 2021 Hunga Tonga–Hunga Ha'apai volcanic eruption.

In the northern hemisphere, the lunar eclipse was captured in this close-up image taken from the Visitor Center at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO), also a Program of NSF’s NOIRLab, near Tucson, Arizona. You can read more about how a lunar eclipse happens in this recent Image of the Week.

The eclipse was the longest total lunar eclipse visible from the Americas since 1989. It also coincided with a “supermoon”, which occurs when the Moon is at its nearest point to Earth.
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Re: Found Images: 2022 May

Post by starsurfer » Sun May 22, 2022 10:43 pm

EGB 6
https://noirlab.edu/public/images/iotw2215a/
Copyright: KPNO/NOIRLab/NSF/AURA
Processing: T.A. Rector (University of Alaska Anchorage/NSF’s NOIRLab), M. Zamani (NSF’s NOIRLab) & D. de Martin (NSF’s NOIRLab)

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Re: Found Images: 2022 May

Post by starsurfer » Sun May 22, 2022 10:46 pm

Sh2-1
http://www.astrostudio.at/1_Deep%20Sky% ... _Sh2-1.jpg
Copyright: Gerald Rhemann
Sh2-1.jpg
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ESO: Full Moon Turns Red

Post by bystander » Mon May 23, 2022 12:03 pm

Full Moon Turns Red
ESO Picture of the Week | 2022 May 23
This ominous Picture of the Week shows our very own Moon undergoing a total lunar eclipse. The image was taken on the night of May 15 2022 from ESO’s Paranal Observatory in Chile. During a lunar eclipse, the Earth is positioned directly between the Sun and the Moon, blocking some of the Sun’s light. This casts a shadow across the Moon’s surface.

The red colour is caused by the Sun’s rays interacting with the Earth’s atmosphere. Light from the Sun contains a whole spectrum of colours. Blue light is dispersed by the atmosphere through a process called Rayleigh scattering (which makes the sky blue) while red light can pass through the atmosphere more easily, becoming slightly deflected. This red light reaches the Moon’s surface, giving rise to its dramatic crimson hue.

This photo was taken during the eclipse’s totality, when the Earth is causing the largest blockage of the Sun’s light. It was taken by two ESO colleagues at Paranal Observatory using an amateur telescope nicknamed “UT5” as a nod to its much larger siblings, the four 8-m Unit Telescopes at ESO’s Very Large Telescope.

Fun fact: astronomers often take spectra of lunar eclipses to understand the signatures that life can leave on Earth’s atmosphere, which is a very useful reference when searching for similar signatures in exoplanets.
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ESA: Hiding in Plain Sight (Liller 1)

Post by bystander » Mon May 23, 2022 12:12 pm

Hiding in Plain Sight
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2022 May 23
The muted red tones of the globular cluster Liller 1 are partially obscured in this image by a dense scattering of piercingly blue stars. In fact, it is thanks to Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) that we are able to see Liller 1 so clearly in this image, because the WFC3 is sensitive to wavelengths of light that the human eye cannot detect. Liller 1 is only 30 000 light-years from Earth — relatively neighbourly in astronomical terms — but it lies within the Milky Way’s ‘bulge’, the dense and dusty region at our galaxy’s centre. Because of that, Liller 1 is heavily obscured from view by interstellar dust, which scatters visible light (particularly blue light) very effectively. Fortunately, some infrared and red visible light are able to pass through these dusty regions. WFC3 is sensitive to both visible and near-infrared (infrared that is close to the visible) wavelengths, allowing us to see through the obscuring clouds of dust, and providing this spectacular view of Liller 1.

Liller 1 is a particularly interesting globular cluster, because unlike most of its kind, it contains a mix of very young and very old stars. Globular clusters typically house only old stars, some nearly as old as the Universe itself. Liller1 instead contains at least two distinct stellar populations with remarkably different ages: the oldest one is 12 billion years old and the youngest component is just 1-2 billion years old. This led astronomers to conclude that this stellar system was able to form stars over an extraordinary long period of time.
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starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2022 May

Post by starsurfer » Mon May 23, 2022 10:27 pm

Sh2-188
https://www.astrobin.com/9ukfkt/
Data: Steve Milne and Barry Wilson
Processing: Steve Milne
8xvJKsce7T1V_16536x16536_XgpPJRVE.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 May

Post by starsurfer » Mon May 23, 2022 10:29 pm

DeHt 5 and G110.3+11.3
https://www.astrobin.com/6n2dmb/
Copyright: Rolf Dietrich
3IqZfrssjeom_16536x16536_YDybTVFH.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 May

Post by starsurfer » Mon May 23, 2022 10:32 pm

Pacman Nebula (NGC 281)
https://www.astrobin.com/xx0t2n/C/
Copyright: Stefan Thrun
eJ7ja09I_16536x0_b9muqi8S.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 May

Post by starsurfer » Mon May 23, 2022 10:34 pm

Witch Head Nebula (IC 2118)
https://www.astrobin.com/k637h7/
Copyright: Shubhendu Sadhukhan
k5qHsTsKUZeW_16536x16536_JXczOqwr.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 May

Post by starsurfer » Mon May 23, 2022 10:36 pm

M78
https://www.astrobin.com/0pv2bo/E/
Copyright: Yizhou Zhang
azkjDKsRPUbQ_2560x0_gH2MuKEV.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 May

Post by Lucadinoi » Tue May 24, 2022 1:54 pm

Ngc 7023 IRIS


12 "RC Truss telescope reduced to 1800
Celestron 80/600 guide tube with Asi Zwo 224 chamber
Moravian G2 8300 camera with internal wheel
Ioptron Cem120 mount
Moonlite focuser and 3.5 "electronic rotator.
Electronic temperature control and anti-condensation bands
Cls ccd, R, G, B, Ha 6nm filters, all Astronomik
Shooting data:
61 x 240 ccd cl
39 x 240 R
39 x 240 G
39 x 240 B
Processing: Pixinsight, Photoshop, star points, astronomy tools
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NOIRLab: A Galaxy of Birth and Death (NGC 2403)

Post by bystander » Thu May 26, 2022 2:39 pm

A Galaxy of Birth and Death
NOIRLab Image of the Week | 2022 May 25
Captured by the Mosaic camera on the Nicholas U. Mayall 4-meter Telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO), a Program of NSF’s NOIRLab, the spiral galaxy NGC 2403, also known as Caldwell 7, highlights the dynamic birth and death of stars. The glowing red spots dotting the galaxy are clouds of ionized hydrogen gas known as HII regions. These areas indicate the birth of young, hot stars, which often ionize nearby hydrogen gas during their dynamic formation. Conversely NGC 2403 has also been the home of the brightest and nearest observed death of a star this millennium: the supernova SN 2004dj. The region in NGC 2403 that contained the star which became a supernova in 2004 had been observed both before, during and after the explosion, providing a fascinating timeline of the impact of the event. Since star formation occurs on a timescale much longer than a human lifetime, the process has to be pieced together like a puzzle through observations of different stars in different stages of the stellar life cycle. It is very satisfying for astronomers to be able to observe supernovae, which occur incredibly quickly even by human standards, to confirm and develop theories of the life cycle of stars.
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Re: Found Images: 2022 May

Post by astrosirius » Thu May 26, 2022 9:38 pm

Caroline's Rose Cluster (NGC 7789)
https://www.astrosirius.org/
Copyright: Lluís Romero
My_Picture.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 May

Post by starsurfer » Sun May 29, 2022 10:20 pm

NGC 3175
https://www.chart32.de/index.php/component/k2/item/378
Copyright: CHART32
Processing: Bernd Flach-Wilken
NGC3175.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 May

Post by starsurfer » Sun May 29, 2022 10:22 pm

VBRC 6
https://members.pcug.org.au/~stevec/VBR ... 3_RC14.htm
Copyright: Steve Crouch
VBRC6.jpg
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ESO: Guiding the Milky Way (VLT)

Post by bystander » Mon May 30, 2022 1:56 pm

Guiding the Milky Way
ESO Picture of the Week | 2022 May 30
This picture of the week shows four powerful laser beams leaving Unit Telescope 4, or ‘Yepun’, at ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile’s Atacama desert. These form the VLT’s 4 Laser Guide Star Facility, which enables astronomers to take extremely crisp images of the cosmos by employing a technology known as adaptive optics.

Using adaptive optics, telescopes are able to correct for the effects of atmospheric turbulence, which causes the “twinkling” and blurring of stars and other objects in the sky. To do this, a deformable mirror reshapes itself up to 1000 times per second based on the observed turbulence. Astronomers measure turbulence by monitoring a bright star in the field of view. If there isn’t a suitable star, they create artificial stars in the Earth’s upper atmosphere using lasers. The lasers in this image have a very specific orange-yellow colour (with a wavelength of 589 nm), exciting sodium atoms about 90 km above ground, causing them to shine like a star.

In the backdrop, almost appearing to follow the path of the laser beams, is the familiar band of the Milky Way stretching across the sky. Also visible is a faint green wash in the sky that results from a phenomenon known as airglow, which is light naturally emitted by atoms and molecules in the atmosphere. Airglow is only visible in areas where the sky is dark enough not to be overshadowed by light pollution.
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ESA: Hubble Goes Galactic Birdwatching (NGC 7496)

Post by bystander » Mon May 30, 2022 2:11 pm

Hubble Goes Galactic Birdwatching
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2022 May 30
This image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope shows the barred spiral galaxy NGC 7496, which lies over 24 million light-years away in the constellation Grus. This constellation, whose name is Latin for crane, is one of four constellations collectively known as the Southern Birds. The others are Pavo, Phoenix and Tucana, which depict a peacock, phoenix, and toucan respectively. The rest of the night sky is also home to a flock of ornithological constellations, including an eagle (Aquilla), swan (Cygnus), crow (Corvus), and dove (Columba).

This image comes from a collection of observations delving into the relationship between young stars and the cold, dense clouds of gas in which they form. In addition to observations with Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3 and Advanced Camera for Surveys, the astronomers behind this project gathered data using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), one of the largest radio telescopes in the world.

As well as shedding light on the speed and efficiency of star formation in a variety of galactic environments, this project is also creating a treasury of data incorporating both Hubble and ALMA observations. This treasure trove of data from two of the world’s most capable observatories will contribute to wider research into star formation, as well as paving the way for future science with the James Webb Space Telescope.
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M8 The Lagoon Nebula

Post by Efrain Morales » Mon May 30, 2022 7:47 pm

The core (Upclose) of Messier 8 (The Lagoon Nebula) on May 28th. ( LX200ACF 305mm OTA, F6.3, ASI183mm Pro Cmos, Ha OIII RGB filter sets )
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Re: Found Images: 2022 May

Post by starsurfer » Mon May 30, 2022 10:39 pm

NGC 5466
https://www.astrobin.com/efzusc/C/
Copyright: Bernd Steiner
jUIVnh6hArKw_2560x0_n1wMX-gx.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 May

Post by starsurfer » Mon May 30, 2022 10:40 pm

M53 and NGC 5053
https://www.astrobin.com/day1fi/
Copyright: Robert Eder
Oc5bIN0uvHUy_16536x0_b9muqi8S.jpg
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