AstroRTC: Research Treasure Chest

The cosmos at our fingertips.
User avatar
AVAO
Commander
Posts: 554
Joined: Tue May 28, 2019 12:24 pm
AKA: multiwavelength traveller
Location: Zurich, Switzerland

AstroRTC: Research Treasure Chest

Post by AVAO » Fri Nov 17, 2023 4:38 pm

This is a pre-news channel for discussing scientific papers that have recently been published on Arxiv or ResearchGate on astronomical topics.

To see the latest posts in reverse order, press this link!
Last edited by AVAO on Fri Nov 17, 2023 5:49 pm, edited 3 times in total.

User avatar
AVAO
Commander
Posts: 554
Joined: Tue May 28, 2019 12:24 pm
AKA: multiwavelength traveller
Location: Zurich, Switzerland

Re: AstroRTC: Research Treasure Chest

Post by AVAO » Fri Nov 17, 2023 5:23 pm

Discovery of a one-sided radio filament of PSR J0538+2817 in S147: escape of relativistic PWN leptons into surrounding supernova remnant?
I.I. Khabibullin,1,2,3 E.M. Churazov,2,3 A.M. Bykov,4 N.N. Chugai,5 and I.I. Zinchenko 6
ARXIV | Preprint 2023 Nov 10
ABSTRACT

We report the discovery of a faint radio filament near PSR J0538+2817 in the NVSS, CGPS, and the Rapid ASKAP Continuum Survey data. This pulsar is plausibly associated with the supernova that gave rise to the Spaghetti Nebula (Simeis 147). The structure is one-sided and appears to be almost aligned (within 17 degrees) with the direction of the pulsar’s proper motion, but in contrast to the known cases of pulsar radio tails, it is located ahead of the pulsar. At the same time, this direction is also approximately (within 5 degrees) perpendicular to the axis of the extended non-thermal X-ray emission around the pulsar. No X-ray or optical emission is detected from the filament region, although the end point of the radio filament appears to be adjacent to a filament of H𝛼 emission. We speculate that this structure might represent a filament connecting pulsar wind nebula with the ambient interstellar medium filled with relativistic electrons escaping the pulsar nebula, i.e. a radio analogue of X-ray filaments of Guitar and Lighthouse PWNs and filaments of non-thermal radio emission in the Galactic Center. ..more...

Reply with quote

RTC4Y Jac

User avatar
AVAO
Commander
Posts: 554
Joined: Tue May 28, 2019 12:24 pm
AKA: multiwavelength traveller
Location: Zurich, Switzerland

Re: AstroRTC: Research Treasure Chest

Post by AVAO » Sun Nov 19, 2023 8:32 am

AVAO wrote: Fri Nov 17, 2023 5:23 pm Discovery of a one-sided radio filament of PSR J0538+2817 in S147: escape of relativistic PWN leptons into surrounding supernova remnant?
I.I. Khabibullin,1,2,3 E.M. Churazov,2,3 A.M. Bykov,4 N.N. Chugai,5 and I.I. Zinchenko 6
ARXIV | Preprint 2023 Nov 10
ABSTRACT

We report the discovery of a faint radio filament near PSR J0538+2817 in the NVSS, CGPS, and the Rapid ASKAP Continuum Survey data. This pulsar is plausibly associated with the supernova that gave rise to the Spaghetti Nebula (Simeis 147). The structure is one-sided and appears to be almost aligned (within 17 degrees) with the direction of the pulsar’s proper motion, but in contrast to the known cases of pulsar radio tails, it is located ahead of the pulsar. At the same time, this direction is also approximately (within 5 degrees) perpendicular to the axis of the extended non-thermal X-ray emission around the pulsar. No X-ray or optical emission is detected from the filament region, although the end point of the radio filament appears to be adjacent to a filament of H𝛼 emission. We speculate that this structure might represent a filament connecting pulsar wind nebula with the ambient interstellar medium filled with relativistic electrons escaping the pulsar nebula, i.e. a radio analogue of X-ray filaments of Guitar and Lighthouse PWNs and filaments of non-thermal radio emission in the Galactic Center. ..more...

Reply with quote

Interesting that the pulsar is not visible in the optical wavelength.

Click to view full size image 1 or image 2
Click to view full size image 1 or image 2
Reply with quote

User avatar
AVAO
Commander
Posts: 554
Joined: Tue May 28, 2019 12:24 pm
AKA: multiwavelength traveller
Location: Zurich, Switzerland

Re: AstroRTC: Research Treasure Chest

Post by AVAO » Wed Nov 22, 2023 12:01 pm

JWST imaging of edge-on protoplanetary disks II. Appearance of edge-on disks with a tilted inner region: case study of IRAS04302+2247
Marion Villenave,1 Karl R. Stapelfeldt,1 Gaspard Duchene,2, 3 Francois Menard,3 Schuyler G. Wolff,4 Marshall D. Perrin,5 Christophe Pinte,6, 3 Ryo Tazaki,3 and Deborah L. Padgett
ARXIV | Preprint 2023 Nov 15
Image gallery of the JWST observations of
IRAS04302. All images are shown with a log stretch....
All image rights belong to the authors of the paper
https://media.arxiv-vanity.com/render-o ... 206/x1.png
ABSTRACT

We present JWST imaging from 2 μm to 21 μm of the edge-on protoplanetary disk around the embedded young star IRAS04302+2247. The structure of the source shows two reflection nebulae separated by a dark lane. The source extent is dominated by the extended filamentary envelope at ∼4.4μm and shorter wavelengths, transitioning at 7μm and longer wavelengths to more compact lobes of scattered light from the disk itself. The dark lane thickness does not vary significantly with wavelength, which we interpret as an indication for intermediate-sized (∼10μm) grains in the upper layers of the disk. Intriguingly, we find that the brightest nebula of IRAS40302 switches side between 12.8 μm and 21 μm. We explore the effect of a tilted inner region on the general appearance of edge-on disks. We find that radiative transfer models of a disk including a tilted inner region can reproduce an inversion in the brightest nebula. In addition, for specific orientations, the model also predicts strong lateral asymmetries, which can occur for more than half possible viewing azimuths. A large number of edge-on protoplanetary disks observed in scattered light show such lateral asymmetries (15/20), which suggests that a large fraction of protoplanetary disks might host a tilted inner region. Stellar spots may also induce lateral asymmetries, which are expected to vary over a significantly shorter timescale. Variability studies of edge-on disks would allow to test the dominant scenario for the origin of these asymmetries.
[/b] ..more...

Reply with quote

RTC4Y Jac
Last edited by bystander on Wed Nov 22, 2023 1:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: No hot links to images > 500 kb.

User avatar
AVAO
Commander
Posts: 554
Joined: Tue May 28, 2019 12:24 pm
AKA: multiwavelength traveller
Location: Zurich, Switzerland

Re: AstroRTC: Research Treasure Chest

Post by AVAO » Thu Nov 23, 2023 9:21 pm

AVAO wrote: Wed Nov 22, 2023 12:01 pm JWST imaging of edge-on protoplanetary disks II. Appearance of edge-on disks with a tilted inner region: case study of IRAS04302+2247
Marion Villenave,1 Karl R. Stapelfeldt,1 Gaspard Duchene,2, 3 Francois Menard,3 Schuyler G. Wolff,4 Marshall D. Perrin,5 Christophe Pinte,6, 3 Ryo Tazaki,3 and Deborah L. Padgett
ARXIV | Preprint 2023 Nov 15
Image gallery of the JWST observations of
IRAS04302. All images are shown with a log stretch....
All image rights belong to the authors of the paper

User avatar
AVAO
Commander
Posts: 554
Joined: Tue May 28, 2019 12:24 pm
AKA: multiwavelength traveller
Location: Zurich, Switzerland

Re: AstroRTC: Research Treasure Chest

Post by AVAO » Sun Nov 26, 2023 12:23 pm

AVAO wrote: Wed Nov 22, 2023 12:01 pm JWST imaging of edge-on protoplanetary disks II. Appearance of edge-on disks with a tilted inner region: case study of IRAS04302+2247
Marion Villenave,1 Karl R. Stapelfeldt,1 Gaspard Duchene,2, 3 Francois Menard,3 Schuyler G. Wolff,4 Marshall D. Perrin,5 Christophe Pinte,6, 3 Ryo Tazaki,3 and Deborah L. Padgett
ARXIV | Preprint 2023 Nov 15

Interesting environment. IRAS04302+2247 is located near HP Tau...

Artistic image composit HST/JWST[/url]


Position of IRAS 04302+2247 at the top right in the middle of the white circle: biggg...Artistic image composit with infill see below[/url]

Credit: KPNO/NOIRLab/NSF/AURA/T.A. Image processing: T.A. Rector, M. Zamani & D. de Martin


Reply with quote

User avatar
AVAO
Commander
Posts: 554
Joined: Tue May 28, 2019 12:24 pm
AKA: multiwavelength traveller
Location: Zurich, Switzerland

Re: AstroRTC: Research Treasure Chest

Post by AVAO » Tue Nov 28, 2023 7:36 pm

Near-Infrared Observations of Outflows and YSOs in the Massive Star-Forming Region AFGL 5180
S. Crowe, R. Fedriani, J. C. Tan, M. Whittle, Y. Zhang, A. Caratti o Garatti, J.P. Farias, A. Gautam, Z. Telkamp, B. Rothberg, M. Grudic, M. Andersen, G. Cosentino, R. Garcia-Lopez, V. Rosero, K. Tanaka, E. Pinna, F. Rossi, D. Miller, G. Agapito, C. Plantet, E. Ghose, J. Christou, J. Power, A. Puglisi, R. Briguglio, G. Brusa, G. Taylor, X. Zhang, T. Mazzoni, M. Bonaglia, S. Esposito, C. Veillet
ARXIV | Preprint 2023 Nov 20
ABSTRACT

Massive stars play important roles throughout the universe, however their formation remains poorly understood. Observations of jets and outflows in high-mass star-forming regions, as well as surveys of young stellar object (YSO) content, can help test theoretical models of massive star formation.

Aims We aim at characterizing the massive star-forming region AFGL 5180 in the near-infrared (NIR), identifying outflows and relating these to sub-mm/mm sources, as well as surveying the overall YSO surface number density to compare to massive star formation models.
Results At least 40 jet knots were identified via NIR emission from H2 and [FeII] tracing shocked gas. Bright jet knots outflowing from the central most massive protostar, S4 (estimated mass ∼11M⊙, via SED fitting), are detected towards the east of the source and are resolved in fine detail with the AO imaging. Additional knots are distributed throughout the field, likely indicating the presence of multiple driving sources.
Conclusions This study demonstrates the utility of high-resolution NIR imaging, in particular with AO, for detecting outflow activity and YSOs in distant regions. The presented images reveal the complex morphology of outflow-shocked gas within the large-scale bipolar flow of a massive protostar, as well as clear evidence for several other outflow driving sources in the region. Finally, this work presents a novel approach to compare the observed YSO surface number density from our study against different models of massive star formation...more...

...Scientific presentation...
Reply with quote

RTC4Y Jac

User avatar
AVAO
Commander
Posts: 554
Joined: Tue May 28, 2019 12:24 pm
AKA: multiwavelength traveller
Location: Zurich, Switzerland

Re: AstroRTC: Research Treasure Chest

Post by AVAO » Tue Nov 28, 2023 8:29 pm

AVAO wrote: Tue Nov 28, 2023 7:36 pm Near-Infrared Observations of Outflows and YSOs in the Massive Star-Forming Region AFGL 5180
S. Crowe, R. Fedriani, J. C. Tan, M. Whittle, Y. Zhang, A. Caratti o Garatti, J.P. Farias, A. Gautam, Z. Telkamp, B. Rothberg, M. Grudic, M. Andersen, G. Cosentino, R. Garcia-Lopez, V. Rosero, K. Tanaka, E. Pinna, F. Rossi, D. Miller, G. Agapito, C. Plantet, E. Ghose, J. Christou, J. Power, A. Puglisi, R. Briguglio, G. Brusa, G. Taylor, X. Zhang, T. Mazzoni, M. Bonaglia, S. Esposito, C. Veillet
ARXIV | Preprint 2023 Nov 20
Click to view full size image 1 or image 2
HERSCHEL/ALLWISEcolor/HSTinfill Original Data:NASA/ESA

Source: NASA/ESA (HST) Hubble Outreach Images

Source: NASA/ESA (HST) Hubble Outreach Images & infill(All image rights belong to the authors of the paper)

User avatar
AVAO
Commander
Posts: 554
Joined: Tue May 28, 2019 12:24 pm
AKA: multiwavelength traveller
Location: Zurich, Switzerland

Re: AstroRTC: Research Treasure Chest

Post by AVAO » Sun Dec 03, 2023 7:29 pm

High-Resolution, Mid-Infrared Color Temperature Mapping of the Central 10 Arcseconds of the
Galaxy

Cuc K. Dinh, Anna Cuirlo, Mark R. Morris, Rainer Schödel, Andrea Ghez, Tuan Do
ARXIV | Preprint 2023 Nov 29
ABSTRACT

The neighborhood of the Galactic black hole boasts a plethora of extended interstellar gas and dust features as well as populations of compact (unresolved, or marginally resolved) features such as the G objects. Most are well manifested in the infrared. To disentangle and characterize the infrared structure of extended features and identify compact sources, we used 3.8~μm (L' filter) data from the NIRC2 imager at the Keck Observatory and 8.6~μm (PAH1 filter) data from the VISIR imager at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) to produce the highest-resolution mid-IR color-temperature map of the inner half-parsec of the Galactic Center to date. From this map, we compile a catalog of features that stand out from their background. In particular, we identify 33 compact sources that stand out against the local background temperature, 11 of which are newly identified ...

[/b] ..more...

Reply with quote

RTC4Y Jac

User avatar
Ann
4725 Å
Posts: 13475
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 5:33 am

Re: AstroRTC: Research Treasure Chest

Post by Ann » Tue Dec 05, 2023 6:29 am

AVAO wrote: Sun Dec 03, 2023 7:29 pm High-Resolution, Mid-Infrared Color Temperature Mapping of the Central 10 Arcseconds of the
Galaxy

Cuc K. Dinh, Anna Cuirlo, Mark R. Morris, Rainer Schödel, Andrea Ghez, Tuan Do
ARXIV | Preprint 2023 Nov 29
ABSTRACT

The neighborhood of the Galactic black hole boasts a plethora of extended interstellar gas and dust features as well as populations of compact (unresolved, or marginally resolved) features such as the G objects. Most are well manifested in the infrared. To disentangle and characterize the infrared structure of extended features and identify compact sources, we used 3.8~μm (L' filter) data from the NIRC2 imager at the Keck Observatory and 8.6~μm (PAH1 filter) data from the VISIR imager at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) to produce the highest-resolution mid-IR color-temperature map of the inner half-parsec of the Galactic Center to date. From this map, we compile a catalog of features that stand out from their background. In particular, we identify 33 compact sources that stand out against the local background temperature, 11 of which are newly identified ...

[/b] ..more...

Reply with quote

RTC4Y Jac
Fascinating, Jac!

This is my favorite picture of the center of the Milky Way:

STScI-01EVT5Y35KFV7KFJ7ERSGDNV40[1].jpg
Hubble-Spitzer Color Mosaic of the Galactic Center

The white vortex (at lower right) is surrounding SgrA*, as far as I can understand. Note the "flow" of little white dots, likely massive stars that are scattered fairly evenly in the innermost part of the galaxy. At lower left you can see the Quintuplet Cluster with the massive Pistol Star, surrounded by a thick white nebula, whose angular appearance resembles half a picture frame, or possibly a pistol. At upper left you can see the smaller Arches Cluster. You can see the "arches" above and to the right of the Arches Cluster. To the upper left of the white vortex, there may be a large supernova remnant.

I read a bit of the arXiv paper that you linked to, but I always have the Hubble-Spitzer image in my mind. Also, I keep thinking of other galaxies that display massive star formation near their cores, such as M95:


Of course, the paper you linked to talked about the central parsec of the Milky Way, and the star formation seen near the center of M95 is probably a lot more than a parsec away from the central black hole of that galaxy.

Still, very interesting! Thanks, Jac!

Ann
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Color Commentator

User avatar
Ann
4725 Å
Posts: 13475
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 5:33 am

Re: AstroRTC: Research Treasure Chest

Post by Ann » Tue Dec 05, 2023 7:02 am

AVAO wrote: Tue Nov 28, 2023 8:29 pm
AVAO wrote: Tue Nov 28, 2023 7:36 pm Near-Infrared Observations of Outflows and YSOs in the Massive Star-Forming Region AFGL 5180
S. Crowe, R. Fedriani, J. C. Tan, M. Whittle, Y. Zhang, A. Caratti o Garatti, J.P. Farias, A. Gautam, Z. Telkamp, B. Rothberg, M. Grudic, M. Andersen, G. Cosentino, R. Garcia-Lopez, V. Rosero, K. Tanaka, E. Pinna, F. Rossi, D. Miller, G. Agapito, C. Plantet, E. Ghose, J. Christou, J. Power, A. Puglisi, R. Briguglio, G. Brusa, G. Taylor, X. Zhang, T. Mazzoni, M. Bonaglia, S. Esposito, C. Veillet
ARXIV | Preprint 2023 Nov 20
Click to view full size image 1 or image 2
HERSCHEL/ALLWISEcolor/HSTinfill Original Data:NASA/ESA

Source: NASA/ESA (HST) Hubble Outreach Images

Source: NASA/ESA (HST) Hubble Outreach Images & infill(All image rights belong to the authors of the paper)

Fascinating, Jac!

This stuff is too technical for me, but I'm very interested in finding out where this region of star formation is located.

S. Crowe et al. wrote:

Here we present NIR observations of the massive starforming region AFGL 5180, also known as IRAS 06058+2138 or G188.949+0.915 (peak pixel in our near-infrared image: RA(J2000)=06:08:53.38, Dec(J2000)=+21:38:28.38;

I filled in those coordinates in my software program and came to a location in Gemini, very close to nebula Sharpless 247.


Ann
Color Commentator

User avatar
AVAO
Commander
Posts: 554
Joined: Tue May 28, 2019 12:24 pm
AKA: multiwavelength traveller
Location: Zurich, Switzerland

Re: AstroRTC: Research Treasure Chest

Post by AVAO » Tue Dec 05, 2023 8:51 pm

Ann wrote: Tue Dec 05, 2023 7:02 am
AVAO wrote: Tue Nov 28, 2023 8:29 pm
AVAO wrote: Tue Nov 28, 2023 7:36 pm Near-Infrared Observations of Outflows and YSOs in the Massive Star-Forming Region AFGL 5180
S. Crowe, R. Fedriani, J. C. Tan, M. Whittle, Y. Zhang, A. Caratti o Garatti, J.P. Farias, A. Gautam, Z. Telkamp, B. Rothberg, M. Grudic, M. Andersen, G. Cosentino, R. Garcia-Lopez, V. Rosero, K. Tanaka, E. Pinna, F. Rossi, D. Miller, G. Agapito, C. Plantet, E. Ghose, J. Christou, J. Power, A. Puglisi, R. Briguglio, G. Brusa, G. Taylor, X. Zhang, T. Mazzoni, M. Bonaglia, S. Esposito, C. Veillet
ARXIV | Preprint 2023 Nov 20
Click to view full size image 1 or image 2
HERSCHEL/ALLWISEcolor/HSTinfill Original Data:NASA/ESA

Source: NASA/ESA (HST) Hubble Outreach Images

Source: NASA/ESA (HST) Hubble Outreach Images & infill(All image rights belong to the authors of the paper)

Fascinating, Jac!

This stuff is too technical for me, but I'm very interested in finding out where this region of star formation is located.

S. Crowe et al. wrote:

Here we present NIR observations of the massive starforming region AFGL 5180, also known as IRAS 06058+2138 or G188.949+0.915 (peak pixel in our near-infrared image: RA(J2000)=06:08:53.38, Dec(J2000)=+21:38:28.38;

I filled in those coordinates in my software program and came to a location in Gemini, very close to nebula Sharpless 247.


Ann
That's right. AFGL 5180 is on the edge of Sh 2-247.
artistic composit / jac berne (flickr)

User avatar
Ann
4725 Å
Posts: 13475
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 5:33 am

Re: AstroRTC: Research Treasure Chest

Post by Ann » Tue Dec 05, 2023 9:32 pm

There are several massive and very distant (~ 5,000 ly) blue OB stars, often giants and supergiants, in northern Orion close to NGC 2174 and in western Gemini relatively close to M35: there is the central star of NGC 2174 itself, HD 42088, as well as chi2 Orionis, PU Geminorum, PX Geminorum, HD 42379, HD 41690, HD 42400 and possibly others. Indeed, the star ionizing Sharpless 247 is an O9.5IV star at the same distance. This certainly seems to be a quite fertile region for star formation. (M35 appears to be unrelated to the other stars I have mentioned.)

Ann
Color Commentator

User avatar
AVAO
Commander
Posts: 554
Joined: Tue May 28, 2019 12:24 pm
AKA: multiwavelength traveller
Location: Zurich, Switzerland

Re: AstroRTC: Research Treasure Chest

Post by AVAO » Wed Dec 13, 2023 5:19 am

Ann wrote: Tue Dec 05, 2023 6:29 am
AVAO wrote: Sun Dec 03, 2023 7:29 pm High-Resolution, Mid-Infrared Color Temperature Mapping of the Central 10 Arcseconds of the
Galaxy

Cuc K. Dinh, Anna Cuirlo, Mark R. Morris, Rainer Schödel, Andrea Ghez, Tuan Do
ARXIV | Preprint 2023 Nov 29
ABSTRACT

The neighborhood of the Galactic black hole boasts a plethora of extended interstellar gas and dust features as well as populations of compact (unresolved, or marginally resolved) features such as the G objects. Most are well manifested in the infrared. To disentangle and characterize the infrared structure of extended features and identify compact sources, we used 3.8~μm (L' filter) data from the NIRC2 imager at the Keck Observatory and 8.6~μm (PAH1 filter) data from the VISIR imager at the Very Large Telescope (VLT) to produce the highest-resolution mid-IR color-temperature map of the inner half-parsec of the Galactic Center to date. From this map, we compile a catalog of features that stand out from their background. In particular, we identify 33 compact sources that stand out against the local background temperature, 11 of which are newly identified ...

[/b] ..more...

Reply with quote

RTC4Y Jac
Fascinating, Jac!

This is my favorite picture of the center of the Milky Way:

STScI-01EVT5Y35KFV7KFJ7ERSGDNV40[1].jpg
Hubble-Spitzer Color Mosaic of the Galactic Center

The white vortex (at lower right) is surrounding SgrA*, as far as I can understand. Note the "flow" of little white dots, likely massive stars that are scattered fairly evenly in the innermost part of the galaxy. At lower left you can see the Quintuplet Cluster with the massive Pistol Star, surrounded by a thick white nebula, whose angular appearance resembles half a picture frame, or possibly a pistol. At upper left you can see the smaller Arches Cluster. You can see the "arches" above and to the right of the Arches Cluster. To the upper left of the white vortex, there may be a large supernova remnant.

I read a bit of the arXiv paper that you linked to, but I always have the Hubble-Spitzer image in my mind. Also, I keep thinking of other galaxies that display massive star formation near their cores, such as M95:


Of course, the paper you linked to talked about the central parsec of the Milky Way, and the star formation seen near the center of M95 is probably a lot more than a parsec away from the central black hole of that galaxy.

Still, very interesting! Thanks, Jac!

Ann
ThanX Ann - Your contextualization is fascinating as always!


Location of the area examined in the paper:
Click to view full size image 1 or image 2
Click to view full size image 1 or image 2
jac berne (flickr) Overlay with images from CHANDRA(blue) & HST(IR/red OPT/white) (Infills: All image rights belong to the authors of the paper!

User avatar
AVAO
Commander
Posts: 554
Joined: Tue May 28, 2019 12:24 pm
AKA: multiwavelength traveller
Location: Zurich, Switzerland

Re: AstroRTC: Research Treasure Chest

Post by AVAO » Sun Jan 28, 2024 5:03 pm

The SARAO MeerKAT 1.3 GHz Galactic Plane Survey
S. Goedhart, et. al.
ARXIV | Preprint 2023 Dez 13
ABSTRACT

We present the SARAO MeerKAT Galactic Plane Survey (SMGPS), a 1.3 GHz continuum survey of almost half of the Galactic Plane (...). SMGPS is the largest, most sensitive and highest angular resolution 1 GHz survey of the Plane yet carried out, with an angular resolution of 8" and a broadband RMS sensitivity of ∼10--20 μ Jy/beam. Here we describe the first publicly available data release from SMGPS which comprises data cubes of frequency-resolved images over 908--1656 MHz, ...Finally, we discuss the tremendous potential of SMGPS by showcasing highlights of the Galactic and extragalactic science that it permits. These highlights include the discovery of a new population of non-thermal radio filaments; identification of new candidate supernova remnants, pulsar wind nebulae and planetary nebulae; improved radio/mid-IR classification of rare Luminous Blue Variables and discovery of associated extended radio nebulae; new radio stars identified by Bayesian cross-matching techniques; the realisation that many of the largest radio-quiet WISE HII region candidates are not true HII regions; and a large sample of previously undiscovered background HI galaxies in the Zone of Avoidance. [/b] ..more...

Reply with quote

RTC4Y Jac

User avatar
AVAO
Commander
Posts: 554
Joined: Tue May 28, 2019 12:24 pm
AKA: multiwavelength traveller
Location: Zurich, Switzerland

Re: AstroRTC: Research Treasure Chest

Post by AVAO » Fri Feb 16, 2024 8:23 pm

3C 273 Host Galaxy with Hubble Space Telescope Coronagraphy
Bin B. Ren, Kevin Fogarty, John H. Debes, Eileen T. Meyer, Youbin Mo, Dimitri Mawet, Marshall D. Perrin, Patrick M. Ogle, Johannes Sahlmann
ARXIV | Preprint 2024 Feb 24
ABSTRACT
The close-in regions of bright quasars' host galaxies have been difficult to image due to the overwhelming light from the quasars. With coronagraphic observations in visible light using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope, we removed 3C 273 quasar light using color-matching reference stars. The observations revealed the host galaxy from 60" to 0.2" with nearly full angular coverage. Isophote modeling revealed a new core jet, a core blob, and multiple smaller-scale blobs within 2.5". The blobs could potentially be satellite galaxies or infalling materials towards the central quasar. Using archival STIS data, we constrained the apparent motion of its large scale jets over a 22 yr timeline. By resolving the 3C 273 host galaxy with STIS, our study validates the coronagraph usage on extragalactic sources in obtaining new insights into the central ~kpc regions of quasar hosts. [/b] ..more...

Reply with quote

RTC4Y Jac

Christian G.
Science Officer
Posts: 154
Joined: Sat Apr 08, 2023 10:37 pm

Re: AstroRTC: Research Treasure Chest

Post by Christian G. » Fri Feb 16, 2024 10:23 pm

AVAO wrote: Fri Feb 16, 2024 8:23 pm 3C 273 Host Galaxy with Hubble Space Telescope Coronagraphy
Bin B. Ren, Kevin Fogarty, John H. Debes, Eileen T. Meyer, Youbin Mo, Dimitri Mawet, Marshall D. Perrin, Patrick M. Ogle, Johannes Sahlmann
ARXIV | Preprint 2024 Feb 24
ABSTRACT
The close-in regions of bright quasars' host galaxies have been difficult to image due to the overwhelming light from the quasars. With coronagraphic observations in visible light using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope, we removed 3C 273 quasar light using color-matching reference stars. The observations revealed the host galaxy from 60" to 0.2" with nearly full angular coverage. Isophote modeling revealed a new core jet, a core blob, and multiple smaller-scale blobs within 2.5". The blobs could potentially be satellite galaxies or infalling materials towards the central quasar. Using archival STIS data, we constrained the apparent motion of its large scale jets over a 22 yr timeline. By resolving the 3C 273 host galaxy with STIS, our study validates the coronagraph usage on extragalactic sources in obtaining new insights into the central ~kpc regions of quasar hosts. [/b] ..more...

Reply with quote

RTC4Y Jac
An utterly spectacular object! 4 trillion times more luminous than the Sun, shines like a thousand galaxies, a temperature of 10 trillion Kelvin while the theoretical limit was supposedly 100 billion K, and this brightest of bright objects is powered by the darkest of dark objects! Beyond anything imagined even in science fiction.
I'm adding this other image of 3C 273 here, I find it gives a sense of how incommensurably brighter than its surrounding the quasar is:
Best_image_of_bright_quasar_3C_273.jpg
p.s. I understand that the paper is about studying what the quasar's light hides whereas my comment is solely about the quasar's blinding light itself! Sorry about that AVAO, I couldn't help myself!
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
AVAO
Commander
Posts: 554
Joined: Tue May 28, 2019 12:24 pm
AKA: multiwavelength traveller
Location: Zurich, Switzerland

Re: AstroRTC: Research Treasure Chest

Post by AVAO » Sun Feb 18, 2024 10:35 am

Christian G. wrote: Fri Feb 16, 2024 10:23 pm
AVAO wrote: Fri Feb 16, 2024 8:23 pm 3C 273 Host Galaxy with Hubble Space Telescope Coronagraphy
Bin B. Ren, Kevin Fogarty, John H. Debes, Eileen T. Meyer, Youbin Mo, Dimitri Mawet, Marshall D. Perrin, Patrick M. Ogle, Johannes Sahlmann
ARXIV | Preprint 2024 Feb 24
ABSTRACT
The close-in regions of bright quasars' host galaxies have been difficult to image due to the overwhelming light from the quasars. With coronagraphic observations in visible light using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) on the Hubble Space Telescope, we removed 3C 273 quasar light using color-matching reference stars. The observations revealed the host galaxy from 60" to 0.2" with nearly full angular coverage. Isophote modeling revealed a new core jet, a core blob, and multiple smaller-scale blobs within 2.5". The blobs could potentially be satellite galaxies or infalling materials towards the central quasar. Using archival STIS data, we constrained the apparent motion of its large scale jets over a 22 yr timeline. By resolving the 3C 273 host galaxy with STIS, our study validates the coronagraph usage on extragalactic sources in obtaining new insights into the central ~kpc regions of quasar hosts. [/b] ..more...

Reply with quote

RTC4Y Jac
An utterly spectacular object! 4 trillion times more luminous than the Sun, shines like a thousand galaxies, a temperature of 10 trillion Kelvin while the theoretical limit was supposedly 100 billion K, and this brightest of bright objects is powered by the darkest of dark objects! Beyond anything imagined even in science fiction.
I'm adding this other image of 3C 273 here, I find it gives a sense of how incommensurably brighter than its surrounding the quasar is:
Best_image_of_bright_quasar_3C_273.jpg
p.s. I understand that the paper is about studying what the quasar's light hides whereas my comment is solely about the quasar's blinding light itself! Sorry about that AVAO, I couldn't help myself!

ThanX for the exciting input Christian.

I am also deeply impressed by the huge amount of concentrated energy that radiates throughout the universe from this place.

3C 273 X-ray jac berne (flickr)

What still fascinates me is the fact that three X-ray & Radio galaxies are pointing their jets towards the sky in the same area of the sky.

​Jac

Origianl Data: NASA/ESA Radio: Planck LFI 030 GHz jac berne (flickr)

Origianl Data: NASA/ESA jac berne (flickr)

Christian G.
Science Officer
Posts: 154
Joined: Sat Apr 08, 2023 10:37 pm

Re: AstroRTC: Research Treasure Chest

Post by Christian G. » Sun Feb 18, 2024 4:12 pm

AVAO wrote: Sun Feb 18, 2024 10:35 am
Christian G. wrote: Fri Feb 16, 2024 10:23 pm
AVAO wrote: Fri Feb 16, 2024 8:23 pm 3C 273 Host Galaxy with Hubble Space Telescope Coronagraphy
Bin B. Ren, Kevin Fogarty, John H. Debes, Eileen T. Meyer, Youbin Mo, Dimitri Mawet, Marshall D. Perrin, Patrick M. Ogle, Johannes Sahlmann
ARXIV | Preprint 2024 Feb 24



Reply with quote

RTC4Y Jac
An utterly spectacular object! 4 trillion times more luminous than the Sun, shines like a thousand galaxies, a temperature of 10 trillion Kelvin while the theoretical limit was supposedly 100 billion K, and this brightest of bright objects is powered by the darkest of dark objects! Beyond anything imagined even in science fiction.
I'm adding this other image of 3C 273 here, I find it gives a sense of how incommensurably brighter than its surrounding the quasar is:
Best_image_of_bright_quasar_3C_273.jpg
p.s. I understand that the paper is about studying what the quasar's light hides whereas my comment is solely about the quasar's blinding light itself! Sorry about that AVAO, I couldn't help myself!

ThanX for the exciting input Christian.

I am also deeply impressed by the huge amount of concentrated energy that radiates throughout the universe from this place.

3C 273 X-ray jac berne (flickr)

What still fascinates me is the fact that three X-ray & Radio galaxies are pointing their jets towards the sky in the same area of the sky.

​Jac

Origianl Data: NASA/ESA Radio: Planck LFI 030 GHz jac berne (flickr)

Origianl Data: NASA/ESA jac berne (flickr)
Thanks for shining even more light on the matter! (no pun intended)
Seriously fascinating...