NASA: Mars 2020 - Next Generation Rover

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NASA: Mars 2020 - Next Generation Rover

Post by bystander » Wed Nov 01, 2017 4:01 pm

Next Mars Rover Will Have 23 'Eyes'
NASA | JPL-Caltech | Mars 2020 | 2017 Oct 31
When NASA's Mars Pathfinder touched down in 1997, it had five cameras: two on a mast that popped up from the lander, and three on NASA's first rover, Sojourner.

Since then, camera technology has taken a quantum leap. Photo sensors that were improved by the space program have become commercially ubiquitous. Cameras have shrunk in size, increased in quality and are now carried in every cellphone and laptop.

That same evolution has returned to space. NASA's Mars 2020 mission will have more "eyes" than any rover before it: a grand total of 23, to create sweeping panoramas, reveal obstacles, study the atmosphere, and assist science instruments. They will provide dramatic views during the rover's descent to Mars and be the first to capture images of a parachute as it opens on another planet. There will even be a camera inside the rover's body, which will study samples as they're stored and left on the surface for collection by a future mission.

All these cameras will be incorporated as the Mars 2020 rover is built at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. They represent a steady progression since Pathfinder: after that mission, the Spirit and Opportunity rovers were designed with 10 cameras each, including on their landers; Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover has 17. ...

Mars 2020 Rover
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23 'Eyes' but no 'Ears'

Post by neufer » Wed Nov 01, 2017 5:25 pm

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/bruce-betts/2016/0215-mars-2020-microphone.html wrote:
A new hope for a microphone on Mars: Enhancing Mars 2020 science with sound
Bruce Betts & Emily Lakdawalla • February 15, 2016

<<When the Mars 2020 rover lands, we may finally hear the first audio recordings from the Martian surface. The Planetary Society has been working for decades to land a Mars Microphone, something that would add a second human sense to the amazing imagery we currently get, and would be very engaging and exciting for not only scientists, but also for the general public. Unfortunately, the only two such instruments to have launched suffered sad fates. The first Planetary Society Mars Microphone crashed with Mars Polar Lander. The second microphone to fly to Mars, on Phoenix, was never turned on because of the potential for an electronic problem. The payload of the ExoMars 2018 rover may include infrasound and pressure sensors that could produce sound-like recordings. In an abstract submitted to the 2016 Lunar and Planetary Science Conference (PDF), members of the Mars 2020 SuperCam team explain how including a microphone on their instrument could support their science -- and record sounds on Mars.

Sylvestre Maurice and his coauthors explain in the abstract that the microphone would be useful both for science and engineering. As with various past proposed and flight Mars microphones, sound in principle could serve as an independent constraint on wind speed, and could help identify the passing of dust devils. The microphone would also record all the various noises made by the rover: the whirr of the actuators, the crunch of the wheels across the ground, the pumps that keep the rover's Freon circulating. And the wind itself would create its own sound, whistling past the rover's various protuberances.>>
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Re: NASA: Mars 2020 - Next Generation Rover

Post by MarkBour » Wed Nov 01, 2017 8:07 pm

Can they also add the ability for it to "bark" ?
Then it would be the first one worthy of the name "Rover".
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NASA Builds its Next Mars Rover Mission - Mars 2020

Post by bystander » Thu Nov 30, 2017 4:24 pm

NASA Builds its Next Mars Rover Mission
NASA | JPL-Caltech | Mars 2020 | 2017 Nov 28
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
In just a few years, NASA's next Mars rover mission will be flying to the Red Planet.

At a glance, it looks a lot like its predecessor, the Curiosity Mars rover. But there's no doubt it's a souped-up science machine: It has seven new instruments, redesigned wheels and more autonomy. A drill will capture rock cores, while a caching system with a miniature robotic arm will seal up these samples. Then, they'll be deposited on the Martian surface for possible pickup by a future mission.

This new hardware is being developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, which manages the mission for the agency. It includes the Mars 2020 mission's cruise stage, which will fly the rover through space, and the descent stage, a rocket-powered "sky crane" that will lower it to the planet's surface. Both of these stages have recently moved into JPL's Spacecraft Assembly Facility.

Mars 2020 relies heavily on the system designs and spare hardware previously created for Mars Science Laboratory's Curiosity rover, which landed in 2012. Roughly 85 percent of the new rover's mass is based on this "heritage hardware." ...
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Re: NASA: Mars 2020 - Next Generation Rover

Post by Life Form » Mon Dec 04, 2017 6:50 pm

MarkBour wrote:Can they also add the ability for it to "bark" ?
Then it would be the first one worthy of the name "Rover".
Not such a silly thought .. sound can often be more important than sight .. in attracting the curiosity of life forms one example.

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Re: NASA Builds its Next Mars Rover Mission - Mars 2020

Post by MarkBour » Tue Dec 05, 2017 4:32 pm

bystander wrote:NASA Builds its Next Mars Rover Mission
NASA | JPL-Caltech | Mars 2020 | 2017 Nov 28

In just a few years, NASA's next Mars rover mission will be flying to the Red Planet.
. . .
A drill will capture rock cores, while a caching system with a miniature robotic arm will seal up these samples. Then, they'll be deposited on the Martian surface for possible pickup by a future mission.
...
And that will be the Mars Rover Pooper-Scooper Mission?
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Re: NASA Builds its Next Mars Rover Mission - Mars 2020

Post by neufer » Tue Dec 05, 2017 7:45 pm


MarkBour wrote:
bystander wrote:NASA Builds its Next Mars Rover Mission
NASA | JPL-Caltech | Mars 2020 | 2017 Nov 28
In just a few years, NASA's next Mars rover mission will be flying to the Red Planet.
. . .
A drill will capture rock cores, while a caching system with a miniature robotic arm will seal up these samples. Then, they'll be deposited on the Martian surface for possible pickup by a future mission.
And that will be the Mars Rover Pooper-Scooper Mission?
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Mars2020: A Piece of Mars Is Going Home

Post by bystander » Wed Feb 14, 2018 4:32 pm

A Piece of Mars Is Going Home
NASA | JPL-Caltech | Mars 2020 | 2018 Feb 13
A chunk of Mars will soon be returning home.

A piece of a meteorite called Sayh al Uhaymir 008 (SaU008) will be carried on board NASA’s Mars 2020 rover mission, now being built at the agency’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. This chunk will serve as target practice for a high-precision laser on the rover’s arm.

Mars 2020’s goal is ambitious: collect samples from the Red Planet’s surface that a future mission could potentially return to Earth. One of the rover’s many tools will be a laser designed to illuminate rock features as fine as a human hair.

That level of precision requires a calibration target to help tweak the laser’s settings. Previous NASA rovers have included calibration targets as well. Depending on the instrument, the target material can include things like rock, metal or glass, and can often look like a painter’s palette.

But working on this particular instrument sparked an idea among JPL scientists: why not use an actual piece of Mars? Earth has a limited supply of Martian meteorites, which scientists determined were blasted off Mars’ surface millions of years ago.

These meteorites aren’t as unique as the geologically diverse samples 2020 will collect. But they’re still scientifically interesting -- and perfect for target practice. ...
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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Re: Mars2020: A Piece of Mars Is Going Home

Post by neufer » Wed Feb 14, 2018 7:08 pm

Click to play embedded YouTube video.
bystander wrote:
A chunk of Mars will soon be returning home.

These meteorites aren’t as unique as the geologically diverse samples 2020 will collect. But they’re still scientifically interesting -- and perfect for target practice. ...
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Mars 2020 Reaches Key Manufacturing Milestone

Post by bystander » Fri Mar 16, 2018 6:44 pm

Next NASA Mars Rover Reaches Key Manufacturing Milestone
NASA | JPL-Caltech | Mars 2020 | 2018 Mar 13
NASA's Mars 2020 mission has begun the assembly, test and launch operations (ATLO) phase of its development, on track for a July 2020 launch to Mars.

The first planned ATLO activities will involve electrical integration of flight hardware into the mission's descent stage. The Mars 2020 rover, as well as its cruise stage, aeroshell and descent stage -- a rocket-powered "sky crane" that will lower the rover to the planet's surface -- will undergo final assembly at the Spacecraft Assembly Facility High Bay 1 at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. ...

Over the next year-and-a-half, engineers and technicians will add subsystems such as avionics, power, telecommunications, mechanisms, thermal systems and navigation systems onto the spacecraft. The propulsion systems were installed earlier this year on the cruise and descent stage main structures. ...
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NASA Announces Landing Site for Mars 2020 Rover

Post by bystander » Tue Nov 20, 2018 4:23 pm

NASA Announces Landing Site for Mars 2020 Rover
NASA | JPL-Caltech | Mars 2020 | 2018 Nov 19
NASA has chosen Jezero Crater as the landing site for its upcoming Mars 2020 rover mission after a five year search, during which every available detail of more than 60 candidate locations on the Red Planet was scrutinized and debated by the mission team and the planetary science community.

The rover mission is scheduled to launch in July 2020 as NASA’s next step in exploration of the Red Planet. It will not only seek signs of ancient habitable conditions – and past microbial life -- but the rover also will collect rock and soil samples and store them in a cache on the planet's surface. NASA and ESA (European Space Agency) are studying future mission concepts to retrieve the samples and return them to Earth, so this landing site sets the stage for the next decade of Mars exploration. ...

Jezero Crater is located on the western edge of Isidis Planitia, a giant impact basin just north of the Martian equator. Western Isidis presents some of the oldest and most scientifically interesting landscapes Mars has to offer. Mission scientists believe the 28-mile-wide (45-kilometer) crater, once home to an ancient river delta, could have collected and preserved ancient organic molecules and other potential signs of microbial life from the water and sediments that flowed into the crater billions of years ago.

Jezero Crater’s ancient lake-delta system offers many promising sampling targets of at least five different kinds of rock, including clays and carbonates that have high potential to preserve signatures of past life. In addition, the material carried into the delta from a large watershed may contain a wide variety of minerals from inside and outside the crater. ...
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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Re: NASA Announces Landing Site for Mars 2020 Rover

Post by neufer » Tue Nov 20, 2018 5:45 pm

bystander wrote:
Tue Nov 20, 2018 4:23 pm
NASA Announces Landing Site for Mars 2020 Rover
NASA has chosen Jezero Crater as the landing site for its upcoming Mars 2020 rover mission after a five year search. Mission scientists believe the 28-mile-wide (45-kilometer) crater, once home to an ancient river delta, could have collected and preserved ancient organic molecules and other potential signs of microbial life from the water and sediments that flowed into the crater billions of years ago.
What if Mars had intelligent microbial life that developed WMD's such as antibacterial soap and they simply wiped themselves off the planet :?:
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“YEH-zuh-doh”

Post by neufer » Wed Nov 21, 2018 4:29 am

http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2018/jezero-landing-site-mars-2020-rover.html wrote:
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
.
<<Jezero — which is named after a town in Bosnia and Herzegovina is a 45-kilometer-wide crater that once held a lake. It is correctly pronounced something like YEH-zuh-doh,” though mission team members typically pronounce it “DZEH-zuh-row.”>>

:arrow: A flight around the crater that will host the Mars 2020 mission based on data from Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. The image and topography are from the Context Camera. The color is from the much wider-angle MARCI camera.

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Mars 2020 Rover Is Put to the Test

Post by bystander » Wed Mar 20, 2019 4:14 pm

Mars 2020 Rover Is Put to the Test
NASA | JPL-Caltech | Mars 2020 | 2019 Mar 19
In a little more than seven minutes in the early afternoon of Feb. 18, 2021, NASA's Mars 2020 rover will execute about 27,000 actions and calculations as it speeds through the hazardous transition from the edge of space to Mars' Jezero Crater. While that will be the first time the wheels of the 2,314-pound (1,050-kilogram) rover touch the Red Planet, the vehicle's network of processors, sensors and transmitters will, by then, have successfully simulated touchdown at Jezero many times before.

"We first landed on Jezero Crater on Jan. 23rd," said Heather Bottom, systems engineer for the Mars 2020 mission at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. "And the rover successfully landed again on Mars two days later."

Bottom was the test lead for Systems Test 1, or ST1, the Mars 2020 engineering team's first opportunity to take the major components of the Mars 2020 mission for a test drive. Over two weeks in January, Bottom and 71 other engineers and technicians assigned to the 2020 mission took over the High Bay 1 cleanroom in JPL's Spacecraft Assembly Facility to put the software and electrical systems aboard the mission's cruise, entry capsule, descent stage and rover through their paces.

"ST1 was a massive undertaking," said Bottom. "It was our first chance to exercise the flight software we will fly on 2020 with the actual spacecraft components that will be heading to Mars — and make sure they not only operate as expected, but also interact with each other as expected." ...
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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Things Are Stacking up for Mars 2020

Post by bystander » Fri Apr 19, 2019 3:21 pm

Things Are Stacking up for Mars 2020
NASA | JPL-Caltech | Mars 2020 | 2019 Apr 18
For the past few months, the clean room floor in High Bay 1 at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, has been covered in parts, components and test equipment for the Mars 2020 spacecraft, scheduled for launch toward the Red Planet in July of 2020. But over the past few weeks, some of these components - the spacecraft-rocket-laden landing system and even the stand-in for the rover (christened "surrogate-rover") - have seemingly disappeared.

In reality, they are still there, tucked neatly into the entry capsule, as they will be when it's time for launch. The procedure is known as vehicle stacking and involves a hyper-detailed plan for what goes where and when. ...

The first step is to place the rocket-powered descent stage on top of the surrogate rover (the real rover is being integrated and tested in tandem with the spacecraft stack). Then, when all the holes line up and everything is attached, checked and re-checked again, the back shell is lowered over them via gantry crane. ...

After the back shell is in place and everything is determined to be fitting properly, the team puts on the parachute nose cone, which protects the parachute during atmospheric entry, followed by the massive doughnut-shaped cruise stage, which will power the Mars 2020 spacecraft on its seven-month voyage to the Red Planet. Then the vehicle stack is turned on its side so technicians and engineers have access to the mating points between the cruise and descent stages to make connections. The stack is then returned to its original position (cruise stage on top) so the heat shield can be raised into position and attached. ...

After three weeks, stacking is finished on April 3, and the spacecraft is transported to JPL's Environmental Test Facility to undergo acoustic testing. During this testing the stack will be bombarded with a thundering wall of sound designed to imitate the sound waves generated during launch. Then, after a check to make sure no bolts have rattled loose or attachment points have become unstuck, the stack heads to the thermal vacuum chamber for a week-long test that simulates the harsh environment of space to assess how the Mars-bound craft and its instruments operate under flightlike conditions. ...
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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