APOD: A Nibble on the Sun (2018 Jul 14)

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APOD: A Nibble on the Sun (2018 Jul 14)

Post by APOD Robot » Sat Jul 14, 2018 4:06 am

Image A Nibble on the Sun

Explanation: The smallest of the three partial solar eclipses during 2018 was just yesterday, Friday, July 13. It was mostly visible over the open ocean between Australia and Antarctica. Still, this video frame of a tiny nibble on the Sun was captured through a hydrogen-alpha filter from Port Elliott, South Australia, during the maximum eclipse visible from that location. There, the New Moon covered about 0.16 percent of the solar disk. The greatest eclipse, about one-third of the Sun's diameter blocked by the New Moon, could be seen from East Antarctica near Peterson Bank, where the local emperor penguin colony likely had the best view. During this prolific eclipse season, the coming Full Moon will bring a total lunar eclipse on July 27, followed by yet another partial solar eclipse at the next New Moon on August 11.

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Re: APOD: A Nibble on the Sun (2018 Jul 14)

Post by bystander » Sat Jul 14, 2018 4:24 am

Williams College Astronomer Captures Solar Eclipse Images from Australia
Williams College | 2018 Jul 13
Jay Pasachoff, professor of astronomy at Williams College and Chair of the International Astronomical Union’s Working Group on Solar Eclipses, observed the second solar eclipse of the year from the grounds of the Mt. Pleasant Radio Observatory of the University of Tasmania in Australia. It was the 68th solar eclipse that he had observed.

Pasachoff reports that the partial eclipse lasted 64 minutes and that weather conditions were ideal, with clear skies virtually the entire duration of the eclipse. Even when clouds appeared in the final minutes of the eclipse, the sun was always visible.

According to Pasachoff, this solar eclipse was visible only from Antarctica and southernmost parts of Australia, especially Tasmania, where 10 percent of the solar disk was covered at maximum.

Pasachoff captured images of the eclipse using a Nikon D600 and 500-mm f/8 Nikkor lens and a Thousand Oaks Optical filter as well as with a Nikon D7100 and 400 mm Nikkor lens with a Questar filter.

There are two more partial solar eclipses—August 11, 2018, and January 6, 2019—before the next total solar eclipse, which Pasachoff will observe from Chile on July 2, 2019, now less than a year away.
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Re: APOD: A Nibble on the Sun (2018 Jul 14)

Post by neufer » Sat Jul 14, 2018 12:02 pm

Click to play embedded YouTube video.
APOD Robot wrote:
Sat Jul 14, 2018 4:06 am
Image A Nibble on the Sun

Explanation: The smallest of the three partial solar eclipses during 2018 was just yesterday, Friday, July 13.

The greatest eclipse, about one-third of the Sun's diameter blocked by the New Moon, could be seen from East Antarctica near Peterson Bank, where the local emperor penguin colony likely had the best view.
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Re: APOD: A Nibble on the Sun (2018 Jul 14)

Post by Boomer12k » Sat Jul 14, 2018 12:35 pm

Seem hardly worth it...but OK...

It is a nice shot...

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Re: APOD: A Nibble on the Sun (2018 Jul 14)

Post by orin stepanek » Sat Jul 14, 2018 3:20 pm

A little nibble!
Monster_Bite_Vector.jpg
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Smile today; tomorrow's another day!

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Re: APOD: A Nibble on the Sun (2018 Jul 14)

Post by heehaw » Sat Jul 14, 2018 3:30 pm

People do go thousands of miles to see solar eclipses ... but NO ONE went there, to see THAT!

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Re: APOD: A Nibble on the Sun (2018 Jul 14)

Post by bystander » Sat Jul 14, 2018 3:38 pm

heehaw wrote:
Sat Jul 14, 2018 3:30 pm
People do go thousands of miles to see solar eclipses ... but NO ONE went there, to see THAT!
Obviously Jay Pasachoff and Padraic Koen did.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
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South Magnetic Pole

Post by neufer » Sat Jul 14, 2018 4:21 pm


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/March_of_the_Penguins wrote:

<<March of the Penguins (French La Marche de l'empereur) is a 2005 French feature-length nature documentary directed and co-written by Luc Jacquet, and co-produced by the National Geographic Society. The documentary depicts the yearly journey of the emperor penguins of Antarctica. In autumn, all the penguins of breeding age (five years old and over) leave the ocean, their normal habitat, to walk inland to their ancestral breeding grounds. There, the penguins participate in a courtship that, if successful, results in the hatching of a chick. For the chick to survive, both parents must make multiple arduous journeys between the ocean and the breeding grounds over the ensuing months. It took one year for the two isolated cinematographers Laurent Chalet and Jérôme Maison to shoot the documentary, which was shot around the French scientific base of Dumont d'Urville in Adélie Land.>>
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Re: APOD: A Nibble on the Sun (2018 Jul 14)

Post by Ironwood » Sat Jul 14, 2018 5:30 pm

If I had a dollar for every eclipse that has looked like that at some point, how many dollars would I have?

A. 1
B. 100
C. 1000
D. 10,000,000,000

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Re: APOD: A Nibble on the Sun (2018 Jul 14)

Post by neufer » Sat Jul 14, 2018 6:32 pm


Ironwood wrote:
Sat Jul 14, 2018 5:30 pm

If I had a dollar for every eclipse that has looked like that at some point, how many dollars would I have?

A. 1
B. 100
C. 1000
D. 10,000,000,000
:arrow: Let us check.
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Re: APOD: A Nibble on the Sun (2018 Jul 14)

Post by ta152h0 » Sat Jul 14, 2018 11:30 pm

WOW, that was close, not unlike the people that negotiate the new turnabouts newly built in town here.
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