Found Images: 2019 May

See new, spectacular, or mysterious sky images.
starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2019 May

Post by starsurfer » Sun May 19, 2019 10:43 am

NGC 1832
http://www.chart32.de/index.php/component/k2/item/309
Copyright: CHART32
Processing: Bernd Flach-Wilken

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Re: Found Images: 2019 May

Post by starsurfer » Sun May 19, 2019 10:46 am

LDN 183 and LDN 169
http://www.astrosurf.com/ilizaso/orriak ... Q_U16m.htm
Copyright: Iñaki Lizaso
LDN183.jpg
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HEIC: Come a Little Closer (Messier 90)

Post by bystander » Mon May 20, 2019 3:10 pm

Come a Little Closer
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2019 May 20
This Picture of the Week stars Messier 90, a beautiful spiral galaxy located roughly 60 million light-years from the Milky Way in the constellation of Virgo (The Virgin). The galaxy is part of the Virgo Cluster, a gathering of galaxies that is over 1200 strong.

This image combines infrared, ultraviolet, and visible light gathered by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFC2) on the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. This camera was operational between 1994 and 2010, producing images with an unusual staircase-like shape as seen here. This is because the camera was made up of four light detectors with overlapping fields of view, one of which gave a higher magnification than the other three. When the four images are combined together in one picture, the high magnification image needs to be reduced in size in order for the image to align properly. This produces an image with a layout that looks like three steps.

Messier 90 is remarkable; it is one of the few galaxies seen to be travelling toward the Milky Way, not away from it. The galaxy’s light reveals this incoming motion in that it is blueshifted. In simple terms, the galaxy is compressing the wavelength of its light as it moves towards us, like a slinky being squashed when you push on one end. This increases the frequency of the light and shifts it towards the blue end of the spectrum. As our Universe is expanding, almost all of the galaxies we see in the Universe are moving away from us, and we therefore see their light as redshifted, but Messier 90 appears to be a rare exception.

Astronomers think that this blueshift is likely caused by the cluster’s colossal mass accelerating its members to high velocities on bizarre and peculiar orbits, sending them whirling around on odd paths that take them both towards and away from us over time. While the cluster itself is moving away from us, some of its constituent galaxies, such as Messier 90, are moving faster than the cluster as a whole, making it so that from Earth we see the galaxy heading towards us. However, some are also moving in the opposite direction within the cluster, and thus seem to be streaking away from us at very high velocity.
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Ann
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Re: HEIC: Come a Little Closer (Messier 90)

Post by Ann » Mon May 20, 2019 11:43 pm

bystander wrote:
Mon May 20, 2019 3:10 pm
Come a Little Closer
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2019 May 20
This Picture of the Week stars Messier 90, a beautiful spiral galaxy located roughly 60 million light-years from the Milky Way in the constellation of Virgo (The Virgin). The galaxy is part of the Virgo Cluster, a gathering of galaxies that is over 1200 strong.

This image combines infrared, ultraviolet, and visible light gathered by the Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 (WFC2) on the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. This camera was operational between 1994 and 2010, producing images with an unusual staircase-like shape as seen here. This is because the camera was made up of four light detectors with overlapping fields of view, one of which gave a higher magnification than the other three. When the four images are combined together in one picture, the high magnification image needs to be reduced in size in order for the image to align properly. This produces an image with a layout that looks like three steps.

Messier 90 is remarkable; it is one of the few galaxies seen to be travelling toward the Milky Way, not away from it. The galaxy’s light reveals this incoming motion in that it is blueshifted. In simple terms, the galaxy is compressing the wavelength of its light as it moves towards us, like a slinky being squashed when you push on one end. This increases the frequency of the light and shifts it towards the blue end of the spectrum. As our Universe is expanding, almost all of the galaxies we see in the Universe are moving away from us, and we therefore see their light as redshifted, but Messier 90 appears to be a rare exception.

Astronomers think that this blueshift is likely caused by the cluster’s colossal mass accelerating its members to high velocities on bizarre and peculiar orbits, sending them whirling around on odd paths that take them both towards and away from us over time. While the cluster itself is moving away from us, some of its constituent galaxies, such as Messier 90, are moving faster than the cluster as a whole, making it so that from Earth we see the galaxy heading towards us. However, some are also moving in the opposite direction within the cluster, and thus seem to be streaking away from us at very high velocity.
Gas being stripped from galaxy Messier 90.
Image credit: A. Boselli et al.
Sci-news wrote:

Messier 90, also known as M90 and NGC 4569, is a giant spiral galaxy located in the constellation Virgo, approximately 53.8 million light-years away.

This galaxy is a member of the Virgo Cluster, a group of about 1,300 — and possibly up to 2,000 — member galaxies.

“Astronomers noticed long ago that Messier 90 contained less gas than expected but they could not see where it had gone,” said Dr. Luca Cortese of the University of Western Australia’s International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research.
...
According to Dr. Cortese and his colleagues Messier 90 is traveling through the Virgo Cluster at about 1,200 km a second, and it is this movement that is causing the gas to be stripped from the galaxy.

“We know that big clusters of galaxies trap a lot of hot gas. So when a galaxy enters the cluster it feels the pressure of all the gas, like when you feel the wind on your face, and that pressure is able to strip matter away from the galaxy,” Dr. Cortese said.
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Re: Found Images: 2019 May

Post by starsurfer » Tue May 21, 2019 1:24 pm

NGC 3199 and Gum 29
http://www.atacama-photographic-observa ... php?id=109
Copyright: Thierry Demange, Richard Galli and Thomas Petit
gum29.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2019 May

Post by starsurfer » Tue May 21, 2019 1:27 pm

NGC 6820 and NGC 6823
https://www.cxielo.ch/gallery/v/nebulae ... 1.jpg.html
Copyright: Martin Rusterholz
ngc6823.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2019 May

Post by starsurfer » Wed May 22, 2019 9:20 am

Sh2-1
https://www.astrobin.com/359106/D/
Copyright: Alberto Pisabarro
n7N1RId_wuJ2_1824x0_gY_RGu3w.jpg
Sh2-7 is the large nebula to the left of Sh2-1.
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Re: Found Images: 2019 May

Post by starsurfer » Wed May 22, 2019 9:23 am

Sh2-101 and Cygnus X-1
https://www.flickr.com/photos/130138181 ... 189229697/
Copyright: Yves Van den Broek
29189229697_80d2510010.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2019 May

Post by starsurfer » Wed May 22, 2019 9:27 am

Sh2-82
http://buckeyestargazer.net/Pages/Nebulae/Sh2-82.php
Copyright: Joel Short
Sh2_82.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2019 May

Post by Ann » Wed May 22, 2019 10:38 am

starsurfer wrote:
Wed May 22, 2019 9:20 am
Sh2-1
https://www.astrobin.com/359106/D/
Copyright: Alberto Pisabarro
n7N1RId_wuJ2_1824x0_gY_RGu3w.jpg
Sh2-7 is the large nebula to the left of Sh2-1.
That's a very lovely picture.

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Re: Found Images: 2019 May

Post by starsurfer » Sat May 25, 2019 5:51 pm

NGC 6520 and B86
http://www.capella-observatory.com/Imag ... GC6520.htm
Copyright: Rainer Sparenberg, Stefan Binnewies and Volker Robering
NGC6520.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2019 May

Post by starsurfer » Sun May 26, 2019 6:35 pm

Abell 2744
http://www.astro-austral.cl/imagenes/ga ... 4/info.htm
Copyright: José Joaquin Pérez
abell2744.jpg
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ESO: Desert Stargazing (Paranal Residencia)

Post by bystander » Mon May 27, 2019 2:11 pm

Desert Stargazing
ESO Picture of the Week | 2019 May 27
Even in their downtime, many astronomers cannot resist catching one more glimpse of the star-studded sky. This image captures a fascinated astronomer stargazing from the Residencia, ESO’s living quarters for staff working at Paranal Observatory in Chile. This view shows the dusty and star-filled band of the Milky Way rising over the Atacama Desert, the remote home of ESO’s Very Large Telescope (which sits atop Cerro Paranal).

The desert’s inhospitable conditions drove the construction of the Residencia, which was completed in 2002. An oasis for astronomers, the building contains 108 bedrooms built into a depression in the desert, and is considered a refuge from the harsh conditions of the Atacama — it even hosts a verdant garden and swimming pool! The building was designed to blend into its environment, and to minimise light pollution in the exceptionally dark skies of Paranal. The Residencia’s fascinating and unusual setting captured the eye and imagination of filmmakers in 2008, when it featured in the James Bond film Quantum of Solace.
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HEIC: Bucking the Trend (Messier 59)

Post by bystander » Mon May 27, 2019 2:21 pm

Bucking the Trend
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2019 May 27
This luminous orb is the galaxy NGC 4621, better known as Messier 59. As this latter moniker indicates, the galaxy was listed in the famous catalogue of deep-sky objects compiled by French comet-hunter Charles Messier in 1779. However, German astronomer Johann Gottfried Koehler is credited with discovering the galaxy just days before Messier added it to his collection.

Modern observations show that Messier 59 is an elliptical galaxy, one of the three main kinds of galaxies along with spirals and irregulars. Ellipticals tend to be the most evolved of the trio, full of old, red stars and exhibiting little or no new star formation. Messier 59, however, bucks this trend somewhat; the galaxy does show signs of star formation, with some newborn stars residing within a disc near the core.

Located in the 2000-strong Virgo Cluster of galaxies within the constellation of Virgo (The Virgin), Messier 59 lies approximately 50 million light-years away from us. This image was taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
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Re: Found Images: 2019 May

Post by starsurfer » Tue May 28, 2019 9:44 am

NGC 4372 and Dark Doodad
http://www.capella-observatory.com/Imag ... GC4372.htm
Copyright: Stefan Binnewies
NGC4372.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2019 May

Post by starsurfer » Tue May 28, 2019 9:46 am

Trifid Nebula (M20)
https://astrodonimaging.com/gallery/trifid-nebula/
Copyright: Don Goldman
M20.jpg
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Re: HEIC: Bucking the Trend (Messier 59)

Post by Ann » Tue May 28, 2019 4:25 pm

bystander wrote:
Mon May 27, 2019 2:21 pm
Bucking the Trend
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2019 May 27
This luminous orb is the galaxy NGC 4621, better known as Messier 59. As this latter moniker indicates, the galaxy was listed in the famous catalogue of deep-sky objects compiled by French comet-hunter Charles Messier in 1779. However, German astronomer Johann Gottfried Koehler is credited with discovering the galaxy just days before Messier added it to his collection.

Modern observations show that Messier 59 is an elliptical galaxy, one of the three main kinds of galaxies along with spirals and irregulars. Ellipticals tend to be the most evolved of the trio, full of old, red stars and exhibiting little or no new star formation. Messier 59, however, bucks this trend somewhat; the galaxy does show signs of star formation, with some newborn stars residing within a disc near the core.

This image was taken by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys.
Weakly starforming lenticular galaxy NGC 205.
Photo: Adam BLock.
The ESA/Hubble picture of M59 shows no sign of star formation. By contrast, (dwarf) lenticular galaxy NGC 205 (a satellite of Andromeda) shows clear signs of recent star formation. Faint dust clouds can be seen near the center of the galaxy, and the stellar population in the core displays a weak blue hue.

M59 is "all yellow" (or a shade of pale pink) in the ESA/Hubble picture, and no dust clouds can be seen. I would like to know how it was determined that M59 contains a few young stars near its center.

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Re: Found Images: 2019 May

Post by starsurfer » Fri May 31, 2019 11:08 am

M10
https://www.astrobin.com/363481/0/
Copyright: Roberto Marinoni
oS6E0hppdapV_1824x0_wmhqkGbg.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2019 May

Post by starsurfer » Fri May 31, 2019 11:12 am

Sh2-114
https://www.astrobin.com/363175/
Copyright: Eric Coles and Mel Helm
qP4psy3h74wA_1824x0_wmhqkGbg.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2019 May

Post by starsurfer » Fri May 31, 2019 11:14 am

Le Gentil III
https://www.flickr.com/photos/130056684 ... 845443522/
Copyright: Ondrej Králik
37845443522_b2797e6986.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2019 May

Post by starsurfer » Sat Jun 01, 2019 4:55 pm

Shouldn't the new month threads have been started by now? New ones for each month should automatically be created on the first day of each month.

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Re: Found Images: 2019 May

Post by bystander » Sat Jun 01, 2019 5:07 pm

starsurfer wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 4:55 pm
New ones for each month should automatically be created on the first day of each month.
Do you know how to do this?
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2019 May

Post by starsurfer » Sun Jun 02, 2019 3:08 pm

bystander wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 5:07 pm
starsurfer wrote:
Sat Jun 01, 2019 4:55 pm
New ones for each month should automatically be created on the first day of each month.
Do you know how to do this?
I only have post reply button and no new topic button for this particular section for some reason.

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Re: Found Images: 2019 May

Post by Liam » Tue Jul 16, 2019 9:12 am

starsurfer wrote:
Sun May 05, 2019 10:27 am
CG 4
http://www.cielaustral.com/galerie/photo94.htm
https://wisepick.org/best-telescope-for ... otography/
Copyright: Ciel Austral
photo94f.jpg
I think it looks like a giant stingray that furrows the universe. Lovecraft himself would have approved, it turned out great!