Found Images: 2019 August

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Found Images: 2019 August

Post by bystander » Thu Aug 01, 2019 7:33 am


Have you seen a great image or video somewhere that you think would make a great APOD? Nominate it for APOD! Please post as much information here as you have about the image/video with a link to any source(s) for it you know of here, and the editors will take a look.

When posting the image itself, please do not post anything larger than a thumbnail here; please honor the copyright holder's copyright.

Please keep hotlinked images under 400K.

Thank you!

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Re: Found Images: 2019 August

Post by starsurfer » Thu Aug 01, 2019 1:06 pm

Soap Bubble Nebula (Ju 1)
https://www.hansonastronomy.com/soap-bubble-nebula
Copyright: Mark Hanson
SoapBubble.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2019 August

Post by starsurfer » Thu Aug 01, 2019 1:11 pm

Dr 14
https://www.astrobin.com/412198/
Copyright: Marcel Drechsler/Chilescope
y-5geB8aYOxZ_1824x0_wmhqkGbg.jpg
The emission nebula to the left is Sh2-305. More information about Marcel Drechsler's discoveries can be found here.
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Re: Found Images: 2019 August

Post by starsurfer » Sun Aug 04, 2019 2:27 pm

NGC 5033 and NGC 5005
http://www.capella-observatory.com/Imag ... 5_5033.htm
Copyright: Josef Pöpsel, Frank Sackenheim and Stefan Binnewies
NGC5033_5005.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2019 August

Post by starsurfer » Sun Aug 04, 2019 2:31 pm

Hen 2-111
https://astrodonimaging.com/gallery/henize-2-111/
Copyright: Don Goldman
Hen2_111.jpg
This image was used in this scientific study.
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Re: Found Images: 2019 August

Post by starsurfer » Sun Aug 04, 2019 2:34 pm

Longmore 9
http://www.chart32.de/index.php/component/k2/item/303
Copyright: CHART32
Processing: Johannes Schedler
Longmore9.jpg
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ESO: A Cosmic Vista

Post by bystander » Mon Aug 05, 2019 2:52 pm

A Cosmic Vista
ESO Picture of the Week | 2019 Aug 05
The telescope in this eye-catching picture is appropriately named VISTA, short for the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy. The telescope is located at ESO’s Paranal Observatory in Chile, where the altitude and arid climate make for cloudless skies and excellent viewing conditions.

Different phenomena in the Universe produce different kinds of light, only a tiny fraction of which is visible to the human eye. VISTA observes infrared light, the same radiation that we can feel as heat. The three-tonne camera housed inside the telescope is extremely sensitive, allowing VISTA to detect this kind of light from very distant sources in the Universe and to produce both stunning images and groundbreaking scientific results.

Enjoying the same exceptional skies as VISTA is another of ESO’s facilities, the Very Large Telescope (VLT), which can be just about be seen atop a distant peak. Despite the impressive size and ingenuity of these facilities, they cannot help but be dwarfed by the sheer majesty of the Universe above, as demonstrated by the kaleidoscopic Milky Way arching across the panorama.

This image was taken by ESO photo ambassador Petr Horálek.
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HEIC: Galactic Creatures at Play (UGC 2369)

Post by bystander » Mon Aug 05, 2019 2:58 pm

Galactic Creatures at Play
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2019 Aug 05
The pair of strange, luminescent creatures at play in this image are actually galaxies — realms of millions upon millions of stars.

This galactic duo is known as UGC 2369. The galaxies are interacting, meaning that their mutual gravitational attraction is pulling them closer and closer together and distorting their shapes in the process. A tenuous bridge of gas, dust, and stars can be seen connecting the two galaxies,, during which they pulled material out into space across the diminishing divide between them.

Interaction with others is a common event in the history of most galaxies. For larger galaxies like the Milky Way, the majority of these interactions involve significantly smaller so-called dwarf galaxies. But every few aeons, a more momentous event can occur. For our home galaxy, the next big event will take place in about four billion years, when it will collide with its bigger neighbour, the Andromeda Galaxy. Over time, the two galaxies will likely merge into one — already nicknamed Milkomeda.
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Re: HEIC: Galactic Creatures at Play (UGC 2369)

Post by Ann » Mon Aug 05, 2019 6:55 pm

bystander wrote:
Mon Aug 05, 2019 2:58 pm
Galactic Creatures at Play
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2019 Aug 05
The pair of strange, luminescent creatures at play in this image are actually galaxies — realms of millions upon millions of stars.

This galactic duo is known as UGC 2369. The galaxies are interacting, meaning that their mutual gravitational attraction is pulling them closer and closer together and distorting their shapes in the process. A tenuous bridge of gas, dust, and stars can be seen connecting the two galaxies,, during which they pulled material out into space across the diminishing divide between them.

Interaction with others is a common event in the history of most galaxies. For larger galaxies like the Milky Way, the majority of these interactions involve significantly smaller so-called dwarf galaxies. But every few aeons, a more momentous event can occur. For our home galaxy, the next big event will take place in about four billion years, when it will collide with its bigger neighbour, the Andromeda Galaxy. Over time, the two galaxies will likely merge into one — already nicknamed Milkomeda.
According to Principal Galaxy Catalog (PGC), which I access through my software, this galactic pair is some 400 light-years away. According to PGC, one member of the pair, NGC 2369B, has a B magnitude of ~15.5 and a far infrared magnitude of ~11. That's very dusty!!!

The ESA/Hubble picture of this pair was made using two filters, 435 nm (really blue) and 814 nm (near infrared). With such a choice of filters, all the blue and red details will be enhanced, or at least that's my understanding.

Note that the blue galaxy is full of white knots, which I take to mean that it is bursting with star formation. Since star formation and dust usually go hand in hand, it makes sense that there would be a starburst in one galaxy and the enormous amount of dust in the other(?)!

Ann
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Re: Found Images: 2019 August

Post by starsurfer » Tue Aug 06, 2019 4:16 pm


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Re: Found Images: 2019 August

Post by starsurfer » Wed Aug 07, 2019 9:24 am

Cat's Eye Nebula (NGC 6543)
https://www.pbase.com/skybox/image/169494880
Copyright: Kevin Quin
169494880.tZLzWEHo.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2019 August

Post by starsurfer » Wed Aug 07, 2019 9:25 am

Abell 36
https://www.britastro.org/node/18546
Copyright: Peter Goodhew
Abell36.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2019 August

Post by starsurfer » Wed Aug 07, 2019 9:26 am


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Re: Found Images: 2019 August

Post by starsurfer » Sat Aug 10, 2019 11:08 am

IC 4592
http://www.atacama-photographic-observa ... php?id=147
Copyright: Thierry Demange, Richard Galli and Thomas Petit
ic4592.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2019 August

Post by starsurfer » Sun Aug 11, 2019 4:52 pm

NGC 134
http://www.karelteuwen.be/photo_page.ph ... 1&album=18
Copyright: Karel Teuwen
NGC134.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2019 August

Post by starsurfer » Mon Aug 12, 2019 10:44 am


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HEIC: The Inky Abyss (NGC 2022)

Post by bystander » Mon Aug 12, 2019 2:51 pm

The Inky Abyss
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2019 Aug 12
Although it looks more like an entity seen through a microscope than a telescope, this rounded object, named NGC 2022, is certainly no alga or tiny, blobby jellyfish. Instead, it is a vast orb of gas in space, cast off by an ageing star. The star is visible in the orb's centre, shining through the gases it formerly held onto for most of its stellar life.

When stars like the Sun grow advanced in age, they expand and glow red. These so-called red giants then begin to lose their outer layers of material into space. More than half of such a star's mass can be shed in this manner, forming a shell of surrounding gas. At the same time, the star's core shrinks and grows hotter, emitting ultraviolet light that causes the expelled gases to glow.

This type of object is called, somewhat confusingly, a planetary nebula, though it has nothing to do with planets. The name derives from the rounded, planet-like appearance of these objects in early telescopes.

NGC 2022 is located in the constellation of Orion (The Hunter).
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AAS: Growing Globular Clusters from Mergers

Post by bystander » Tue Aug 13, 2019 5:00 pm

Growing Globular Clusters from Mergers
AAS NOVA Featured Image | 2019 Aug 12
Susanna Kohler wrote:

How do globular clusters — massive and dense gravitationally bound stellar systems — form? A team of scientists led by Natalia Lahén (University of Helsinki, Finland) explores the possibility that the mergers of gas-rich dwarf galaxies can result in the formation of massive, low-metallicity clusters of stars much like the local globular clusters we observe today. The beautiful series of images above are frames from the authors’ hydrodynamical simulations of the aftermath of a dwarf-galaxy merger. The three sets of panels show surface density of stars (left) and gas (center), and the thermal gas pressure (right), at two times during the simulation (the bottom panels are from 2 million years later than the top). The simulations demonstrate the formation of hundreds of stellar clusters in the filamentary gas structures after merger, including some with properties like local globular clusters.

The Formation of Low-metallicity Globular Clusters in Dwarf Galaxy Mergers ~ Natalia Lahén et al
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Re: Found Images: 2019 August

Post by starsurfer » Wed Aug 14, 2019 1:18 pm

IC 5076
http://astro-koop.de/?attachment_id=2042
Copyright: Stefan Heutz, Wolfgang Ries and Michael Breite
ic5076.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2019 August

Post by starsurfer » Thu Aug 15, 2019 1:29 pm

NGC 1999
https://www.astrobin.com/345178/
Copyright: Ben Koltenbah
PBFWA2p8JFWv_1824x0_wmhqkGbg.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2019 August

Post by starsurfer » Thu Aug 15, 2019 1:32 pm

vdB38
https://www.astrobin.com/392145/
Copyright: Eric Coles
9nhZMF-VmcDZ_1824x0_wmhqkGbg.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2019 August

Post by starsurfer » Thu Aug 15, 2019 1:35 pm


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Re: Found Images: 2019 August

Post by starsurfer » Sat Aug 17, 2019 1:10 pm