APOD: Quadrantid Meteors through Orion (2020 Jan 20)

Comments and questions about the APOD on the main view screen.
User avatar
APOD Robot
Otto Posterman
Posts: 4275
Joined: Fri Dec 04, 2009 3:27 am

APOD: Quadrantid Meteors through Orion (2020 Jan 20)

Post by APOD Robot » Mon Jan 20, 2020 5:09 am

Image Quadrantid Meteors through Orion

Explanation: Why are these meteor trails nearly parallel? Because they were all shed by the same space rock and so can be traced back to the same direction on the sky: the radiant of the Quadrantid Meteor Shower. This direction used to be toward the old constellation of Quadrans Muralis, hence the name Quadrantids, but when the International Astronomical Union formulated its list of modern constellations in 1922, this constellation did not make the list. Even though the meteors are now considered to originate from the recognized constellation of Bootes, the old name stuck. Regardless of the designation, every January the Earth moves through a dust stream and bits of this dust glow as meteors as they heat up in Earth's atmosphere. The featured image composite was taken on January 4 with a picturesque snowy Slovakian landscape in the foreground, and a deep-exposure sky prominently featuring the constellation Orion in the background. The red star Betelgeuse appears unusually dim -- its fading over the past few months is being tracked by astronomers.

<< Previous APOD This Day in APOD Next APOD >>

Greg Parker

Re: APOD: Quadrantid Meteors through Orion (2020 Jan 20)

Post by Greg Parker » Mon Jan 20, 2020 9:03 am

In the annotation it should read the Rosette Nebula - Rosetta is the stone found in Egypt that allowed the hieroglyphics to be deciphered.

User avatar
Ann
4725 Å
Posts: 11319
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 5:33 am

Re: APOD: Quadrantid Meteors through Orion (2020 Jan 20)

Post by Ann » Mon Jan 20, 2020 10:26 am

Today's APOD is a lovely picture. Not surprisingly, while I appreciate the Quadrantids and really like the explanation of how they got their name, I get my kicks from the splendid portrait of the night sky. Among other delights of the image, I just love the fact that we get to see such a great picture that "puts the current faintness of Betelgeuse in perspective". We can compare Betelgeuse with Aldebaran, yes, Betelgeuse is fainter, and Procyon, yes, Betelgeuse is strikingly fainter, and Rigel, yes, Betelgeuse is very obviously fainter than Rigel too, of course. I'm glad that this remarkable faintness of Betelgeuse has been recorded for posterity so beautifully here, because the now somewhat sickly red supergiant of Orion could return to normal in a few months or even sooner, and then it's nice to have photographic evidence of how faint it once was!

Unsurprisingly, I absolutely adore the colors. They are saturated but not "too saturated", and they carry a ton of information. I love the fact that Betelgeuse looks redder than Aldebaran in this image, because it really is redder, too!

I love that we can see how bright and saturated various emission nebulas are. Tiny little Orion Nebula is the brightest, of course, and much larger and strikingly rosy pink Rosette Nebula looks like the second brightest nebula. The Horsehead region nebula in Orion and the California Nebula appear to share third place.

And I love the blue, blue, blue color of the Pleiades. What a surprise, right? :wink:

Ann
Last edited by Ann on Mon Jan 20, 2020 5:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Color Commentator

GeoX

Re: APOD: Quadrantid Meteors through Orion (2020 Jan 20)

Post by GeoX » Mon Jan 20, 2020 3:37 pm

Check out the photographer’s website as it is fantastic!
Not only is he very skilled with an eye for composition he must have a monster of a travel budget.
Truly great stuff!

User avatar
orin stepanek
Plutopian
Posts: 6195
Joined: Wed Jul 27, 2005 3:41 pm
Location: Nebraska

Re: APOD: Quadrantid Meteors through Orion (2020 Jan 20)

Post by orin stepanek » Mon Jan 20, 2020 5:09 pm

QuadrantidsOrion_Horalek_960_annotated.jpg

Very nice write up Ann! I love this picture! 8-)
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Orin

Smile today; tomorrow's another day!

ta152h0
Schooled
Posts: 1384
Joined: Mon Aug 29, 2005 12:46 am
Location: Auburn, Washington, USA

Re: APOD: Quadrantid Meteors through Orion (2020 Jan 20)

Post by ta152h0 » Mon Jan 20, 2020 7:09 pm

The town where I live now has installed LED lights all over the city, pretty much wiping out stars at night. Can you tell from the Space Station that city lights are brighter?
Wolf Kotenberg

User avatar
Chris Peterson
Abominable Snowman
Posts: 15858
Joined: Wed Jan 31, 2007 11:13 pm
Location: Guffey, Colorado, USA

Re: APOD: Quadrantid Meteors through Orion (2020 Jan 20)

Post by Chris Peterson » Mon Jan 20, 2020 9:00 pm

ta152h0 wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 7:09 pm
The town where I live now has installed LED lights all over the city, pretty much wiping out stars at night. Can you tell from the Space Station that city lights are brighter?
Too bad they bungled it. LED lights also allow for the most dark-sky friendly cities to exist.
Chris

*****************************************
Chris L Peterson
Cloudbait Observatory
http://www.cloudbait.com

User avatar
neufer
Vacationer at Tralfamadore
Posts: 18008
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 1:57 pm
Location: Alexandria, Virginia

Re: APOD: Quadrantid Meteors through Orion (2020 Jan 20)

Post by neufer » Mon Jan 20, 2020 10:03 pm

Chris Peterson wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 9:00 pm
ta152h0 wrote:
Mon Jan 20, 2020 7:09 pm

The town where I live now has installed LED lights all over the city, pretty much wiping out stars at night. Can you tell from the Space Station that city lights are brighter?
Too bad they bungled it. LED lights also allow for the most dark-sky friendly cities to exist.
Were they LED a stray lights :?:
Art Neuendorffer