APOD: Stars over an Erupting Volcano (2021 Mar 03)

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APOD: Stars over an Erupting Volcano (2021 Mar 03)

Post by APOD Robot » Wed Mar 03, 2021 5:05 am

Image Stars over an Erupting Volcano

Explanation: Mt. Etna has been erupting for hundreds of thousands of years. Located in Sicily, Italy, the volcano produces lava fountains over one kilometer high. Mt. Etna is not only one of the most active volcanoes on Earth, it is one of the largest, measuring over 50 kilometers at its base and rising nearly 3 kilometers high. Pictured erupting last month, a lava plume shoots upwards, while hot lava flows down the volcano's exterior. Likely satellite trails appear above, while ancient stars dot the sky far in the distance. This volcanic eruption was so strong that nearby airports were closed to keep planes from flying through the dangerous plume. The image foreground and background were captured consecutively by the same camera and from the same location.

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Ann
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Re: APOD: Stars over an Erupting Volcano (2021 Mar 03)

Post by Ann » Wed Mar 03, 2021 7:59 am

It always drives me crazy when I can't identify the background stars of an APOD, so...

APOD March 3 2021 annotated.png
Lambda Orionis and Bellatrix in the APOD.
Ek1nMwUCbDjU_620x0_20f4w0s-[1].png
Lambda Orionis. Photo: Michael Feigenbaum.

This is what the annotations mean:

1) Lambda Orionis.
2) Bellatrix in Orion's shoulder.
3) A funny little Dipper-shaped asterism. The top two stars are HD 34907 and HD 34793.

Ann
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Re: APOD: Stars over an Erupting Volcano (2021 Mar 03)

Post by orin stepanek » Wed Mar 03, 2021 1:53 pm

Grand Eruption; I'd say! :mrgreen: Stars above the volcano? Bet beings on planets around those stars don't even know about Earth and it's volcanos! Just saying! 😏

VolcanoStars_Vella_1080.jpg

Ah! Caught APOD's kitty cats; strange companions! :lol2:
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Smile today; tomorrow's another day!

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Re: APOD: Stars over an Erupting Volcano (2021 Mar 03)

Post by johnnydeep » Wed Mar 03, 2021 3:40 pm

Ann wrote:
Wed Mar 03, 2021 7:59 am
It always drives me crazy when I can't identify the background stars of an APOD, so...

APOD March 3 2021 annotated.png
Lambda Orionis and Bellatrix in the APOD.
Ek1nMwUCbDjU_620x0_20f4w0s-[1].png
Lambda Orionis. Photo: Michael Feigenbaum.

This is what the annotations mean:

1) Lambda Orionis.
2) Bellatrix in Orion's shoulder.
3) A funny little Dipper-shaped asterism. The top two stars are HD 34907 and HD 34793.

Ann
Thanks. How DO you do that?! ...I need to look up at the sky more often...
--
"To B̬̻̋̚o̞̮̚̚l̘̲̀᷾d̫͓᷅ͩḷ̯᷁ͮȳ͙᷊͠ Go......Beyond The F͇̤i̙̖e̤̟l̡͓d͈̹s̙͚ We Know."

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Re: APOD: Stars over an Erupting Volcano (2021 Mar 03)

Post by drgnldy123@comcast.net » Wed Mar 03, 2021 4:33 pm

Thank you so much for the amazing pictures I have enjoyed since you started this website! Yes, I am one of the old ones that dreams of what awaits us in this vast and beautiful cosmos.
This is a great example of the beauty to be found right here on Earth.
Becky MacFarlane

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Ann
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Re: APOD: Stars over an Erupting Volcano (2021 Mar 03)

Post by Ann » Wed Mar 03, 2021 4:37 pm

johnnydeep wrote:
Wed Mar 03, 2021 3:40 pm
Ann wrote:
Wed Mar 03, 2021 7:59 am
It always drives me crazy when I can't identify the background stars of an APOD, so...

APOD March 3 2021 annotated.png
Lambda Orionis and Bellatrix in the APOD.
Ek1nMwUCbDjU_620x0_20f4w0s-[1].png
Lambda Orionis. Photo: Michael Feigenbaum.

This is what the annotations mean:

1) Lambda Orionis.
2) Bellatrix in Orion's shoulder.
3) A funny little Dipper-shaped asterism. The top two stars are HD 34907 and HD 34793.

Ann
Thanks. How DO you do that?! ...I need to look up at the sky more often...

Lambda Orionis, Bellatrix and Dipper shaped asterism annotated.png
Well, I recognize the Lambda Orionis cluster/asterism, and I worked from there. The hardest thing was the little Dipper-like asterism. I would never have found it without my software Guide!

Ann
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johnnydeep
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Re: APOD: Stars over an Erupting Volcano (2021 Mar 03)

Post by johnnydeep » Wed Mar 03, 2021 4:55 pm

Ann wrote:
Wed Mar 03, 2021 4:37 pm
johnnydeep wrote:
Wed Mar 03, 2021 3:40 pm
Ann wrote:
Wed Mar 03, 2021 7:59 am
It always drives me crazy when I can't identify the background stars of an APOD, so...

APOD March 3 2021 annotated.png
Lambda Orionis and Bellatrix in the APOD.
Ek1nMwUCbDjU_620x0_20f4w0s-[1].png
Lambda Orionis. Photo: Michael Feigenbaum.

This is what the annotations mean:

1) Lambda Orionis.
2) Bellatrix in Orion's shoulder.
3) A funny little Dipper-shaped asterism. The top two stars are HD 34907 and HD 34793.

Ann
Thanks. How DO you do that?! ...I need to look up at the sky more often...

Lambda Orionis, Bellatrix and Dipper shaped asterism annotated.png
Well, I recognize the Lambda Orionis cluster/asterism, and I worked from there. The hardest thing was the little Dipper-like asterism. I would never have found it without my software Guide!

Ann
Software guide? What software is that?
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Ann
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Re: APOD: Stars over an Erupting Volcano (2021 Mar 03)

Post by Ann » Wed Mar 03, 2021 5:28 pm

johnnydeep wrote:
Wed Mar 03, 2021 4:55 pm
Ann wrote:
Wed Mar 03, 2021 4:37 pm
johnnydeep wrote:
Wed Mar 03, 2021 3:40 pm


Thanks. How DO you do that?! ...I need to look up at the sky more often...

Lambda Orionis, Bellatrix and Dipper shaped asterism annotated.png
Well, I recognize the Lambda Orionis cluster/asterism, and I worked from there. The hardest thing was the little Dipper-like asterism. I would never have found it without my software Guide!

Ann
Software guide? What software is that?
Its name is Guide. It's quite old, not really up to date. It was made by someone called "Project Pluto". I don't think that person answers to mail anymore.

I've just used it forever, and I love it.

Ann
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johnnydeep
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Re: APOD: Stars over an Erupting Volcano (2021 Mar 03)

Post by johnnydeep » Wed Mar 03, 2021 7:13 pm

Ann wrote:
Wed Mar 03, 2021 5:28 pm
johnnydeep wrote:
Wed Mar 03, 2021 4:55 pm
Ann wrote:
Wed Mar 03, 2021 4:37 pm



Lambda Orionis, Bellatrix and Dipper shaped asterism annotated.png
Well, I recognize the Lambda Orionis cluster/asterism, and I worked from there. The hardest thing was the little Dipper-like asterism. I would never have found it without my software Guide!

Ann
Software guide? What software is that?
Its name is Guide. It's quite old, not really up to date. It was made by someone called "Project Pluto". I don't think that person answers to mail anymore.

I've just used it forever, and I love it.

Ann
Ok, thanks. Some quick googling didn't find it. I have a few free sky guide apps on my iPad (Star Walk, etc.), which are all pretty good, and there is also the free Stellarium, which has Windows, MacOS and Linux versions as well as a web version - https://stellarium-web.org. No doubt there are other good ones.
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"To B̬̻̋̚o̞̮̚̚l̘̲̀᷾d̫͓᷅ͩḷ̯᷁ͮȳ͙᷊͠ Go......Beyond The F͇̤i̙̖e̤̟l̡͓d͈̹s̙͚ We Know."

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Re: APOD: Stars over an Erupting Volcano (2021 Mar 03)

Post by Chris Peterson » Wed Mar 03, 2021 7:53 pm

johnnydeep wrote:
Wed Mar 03, 2021 7:13 pm
Ann wrote:
Wed Mar 03, 2021 5:28 pm
johnnydeep wrote:
Wed Mar 03, 2021 4:55 pm


Software guide? What software is that?
Its name is Guide. It's quite old, not really up to date. It was made by someone called "Project Pluto". I don't think that person answers to mail anymore.

I've just used it forever, and I love it.

Ann
Ok, thanks. Some quick googling didn't find it. I have a few free sky guide apps on my iPad (Star Walk, etc.), which are all pretty good, and there is also the free Stellarium, which has Windows, MacOS and Linux versions as well as a web version - https://stellarium-web.org. No doubt there are other good ones.
https://www.projectpluto.com/

That said, I wouldn't recommend it. There are lots of newer programs with more modern user interfaces, including free ones like Stellarium.
Chris

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johnnydeep
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Re: APOD: Stars over an Erupting Volcano (2021 Mar 03)

Post by johnnydeep » Wed Mar 03, 2021 8:04 pm

Chris Peterson wrote:
Wed Mar 03, 2021 7:53 pm
johnnydeep wrote:
Wed Mar 03, 2021 7:13 pm
Ann wrote:
Wed Mar 03, 2021 5:28 pm


Its name is Guide. It's quite old, not really up to date. It was made by someone called "Project Pluto". I don't think that person answers to mail anymore.

I've just used it forever, and I love it.

Ann
Ok, thanks. Some quick googling didn't find it. I have a few free sky guide apps on my iPad (Star Walk, etc.), which are all pretty good, and there is also the free Stellarium, which has Windows, MacOS and Linux versions as well as a web version - https://stellarium-web.org. No doubt there are other good ones.
https://www.projectpluto.com/

That said, I wouldn't recommend it. There are lots of newer programs with more modern user interfaces, including free ones like Stellarium.
I guess it's an acquired taste :) I had been searching for "guide astronomy", not "project pluto". Of course! (Plus, i only needed to scroll down my search results page a bit more and would have found Guide.)

And the Guide 9.1 software is not free (at least not any more), and as Ann said, it's a little old (well, only 5 years):
Ordering Guide 9.1
Last updated 2016 Jan 31

Guide 9.1 costs $40, both for new orders and upgrades. There is no charge for shipping/handling within the US and Canada, and a $5 charge outside those countries. You will receive a Guide 9.1 DVD via postal mail.
--
"To B̬̻̋̚o̞̮̚̚l̘̲̀᷾d̫͓᷅ͩḷ̯᷁ͮȳ͙᷊͠ Go......Beyond The F͇̤i̙̖e̤̟l̡͓d͈̹s̙͚ We Know."

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Re: APOD: Stars over an Erupting Volcano (2021 Mar 03)

Post by neufer » Fri Mar 05, 2021 3:25 am

https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/147996/a-glowing-plume-over-mount-etna wrote:
A Glowing Plume Over Mount Etna

NASA Earth Observatory image by Joshua Stevens, using VIIRS day-night band data from the Joint Polar Satellite System and Landsat data from the U.S. Geological Survey. Story by Adam Voiland.

<<There is nothing particularly unusual about Mount Etna flinging lava, volcanic ash, or molten rocks into the air. The Italian volcano ranks as one the most active in Europe and has been in a state of eruption since 2011.

Yet even experienced Etna watchers have been wowed by the intensity of the volcano’s unrest in February 2021. Starting on February 16, Etna’s Southeast Crater produced a string of intense lava fountains that continued sporadically for nearly a week. Southeast Crater is one of four summit craters on the volcano and the youngest; it formed in 1971.

“The most recent novelty is that the last six eruptive paroxysms were among the most violent in the Southeast Crater's young history,” explained Marco Neri, a volcanologist with Italy's National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology (INGV).

February 20-21 and February 22-23 brought particularly intense activity. At times, lava fountains soared as high as 1.5 kilometers, about 3 times the height of One World Trade Center, the tallest building in the United States. Columns of ash and small rock fragments (called lapilli) rose as high 10 kilometers in altitude. Long lava flows poured down Etna's eastern flank.

While the recent paroxysms have impressed geologists, they were not out of character for the restive volcano. Paroxysms of similar intensity have occurred at Mount Etna at least four times since 1989, and the volcano has produced roughly 250 paroxysms of various strengths since 1977, said Boris Behncke, also with INGV.

While ash temporarily closed the nearby airport and meant extra sweeping for many people in northern Sicily, the February paroxysms caused little serious damage or disruption. As long as the paroxysms remain at this intensity and lava comes from the summit rather than the sides of the volcano, the risks poses to surrounding communities are small.

But there is no guarantee that Etna will remain in its current eruptive stance forever. “Periods of intense activity are almost always followed by lateral eruptions that open up mouths on the flank of the volcano, at times at low elevations,” said Neri. “That means there is a concrete possibility that lava could directly affect an urbanized area, as has happened numerous times in the past.”

Lava from Etna has occasionally caused problems for surrounding communities. In 1669, lava overwhelmed part of Catania. In 1983, engineers used dynamite to divert lava away from homes. And in 1992, the army had to build an earthen wall to protect a village.>>
Art Neuendorffer