APOD: Orion Nebula: The Hubble View (2021 Jun 29)

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APOD: Orion Nebula: The Hubble View (2021 Jun 29)

Post by APOD Robot » Tue Jun 29, 2021 4:06 am

Image Orion Nebula: The Hubble View

Explanation: Few cosmic vistas excite the imagination like the Orion Nebula. Also known as M42, the nebula's glowing gas surrounds hot young stars at the edge of an immense interstellar molecular cloud only 1,500 light-years away. The Orion Nebula offers one of the best opportunities to study how stars are born partly because it is the nearest large star-forming region, but also because the nebula's energetic stars have blown away obscuring gas and dust clouds that would otherwise block our view - providing an intimate look at a range of ongoing stages of starbirth and evolution. The featured image of the Orion Nebula is among the sharpest ever, constructed using data from the Hubble Space Telescope. The entire Orion Nebula spans about 40 light years and is located in the same spiral arm of our Galaxy as the Sun.

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Re: APOD: Orion Nebula: The Hubble View (2021 Jun 29)

Post by Ann » Tue Jun 29, 2021 4:32 am

This is a golden oldie, and it's nice to see it again. Of course, it has been processed a little bit differently.

The colors are very soft and beautiful, but somewhat "false". That should follow from the fact that this Hubble image is a combination of many filters, some of which don't detect visible light. Of course, the colors are very much a product of processing, too.

But the colors are somewhat "true", too. I love the pale yellow-green hues near the Trapezium, because it makes perfect sense that this region should suffused by red Hα light and blue-green OIII light, which together should create a yellow-green hue. Also the region near the Trapezium should be very bright.

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Re: APOD: Orion Nebula: The Hubble View (2021 Jun 29)

Post by VictorBorun » Tue Jun 29, 2021 7:12 am

Ann wrote:
Tue Jun 29, 2021 4:32 am
The colors are very soft and beautiful, but somewhat "false". That should follow from the fact that this Hubble image is a combination of many filters, some of which don't detect visible light.
I wish there were internet page-friendly interactive tools like zoom and panning in the band of wavelengths.
Rendering in RGB a wavelength window in a range of several monochrome images, mapping the longest wavelength monochrome image to RGB red, the shortest one to RGB blue and spreading each of the rest in the wavelength window to hues in the blue-to-red range at equal intervals.

There could be a ruler with a selection window like a timescale ruler in an audio or video editor; zooming in and out makes the selection window narrow or large; panning slides the window along the scale; the scale has ticks where the available wavelengths are, and the selection window is highlighted.

There could be a way to refer to an image specifying the screen selection window as well as wavelength selection window. And a way to copy reference to the selection you are currently viewing.

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Re: APOD: Orion Nebula: The Hubble View (2021 Jun 29)

Post by rstevenson » Tue Jun 29, 2021 9:27 am

VictorBorun wrote:
Tue Jun 29, 2021 7:12 am
I wish there were internet page-friendly interactive tools like zoom and panning in the band of wavelengths.
Rendering in RGB a wavelength window in a range of several monochrome images, mapping the longest wavelength monochrome image to RGB red, the shortest one to RGB blue and spreading each of the rest in the wavelength window to hues in the blue-to-red range at equal intervals.

There could be a ruler with a selection window like a timescale ruler in an audio or video editor; zooming in and out makes the selection window narrow or large; panning slides the window along the scale; the scale has ticks where the available wavelengths are, and the selection window is highlighted.

There could be a way to refer to an image specifying the screen selection window as well as wavelength selection window. And a way to copy reference to the selection you are currently viewing.
That sounds like a good idea, Victor. But I imagine the processing power required would be quite beyond anything that could be done through a web browser. Perhaps a Photoshop plug-in could do it.

Rob

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Re: APOD: Orion Nebula: The Hubble View (2021 Jun 29)

Post by Chris Peterson » Tue Jun 29, 2021 1:45 pm

rstevenson wrote:
Tue Jun 29, 2021 9:27 am
VictorBorun wrote:
Tue Jun 29, 2021 7:12 am
I wish there were internet page-friendly interactive tools like zoom and panning in the band of wavelengths.
Rendering in RGB a wavelength window in a range of several monochrome images, mapping the longest wavelength monochrome image to RGB red, the shortest one to RGB blue and spreading each of the rest in the wavelength window to hues in the blue-to-red range at equal intervals.

There could be a ruler with a selection window like a timescale ruler in an audio or video editor; zooming in and out makes the selection window narrow or large; panning slides the window along the scale; the scale has ticks where the available wavelengths are, and the selection window is highlighted.

There could be a way to refer to an image specifying the screen selection window as well as wavelength selection window. And a way to copy reference to the selection you are currently viewing.
That sounds like a good idea, Victor. But I imagine the processing power required would be quite beyond anything that could be done through a web browser. Perhaps a Photoshop plug-in could do it.

Rob
The processing required is simple and could easily be done via browser scripting, even on some weak little Chromebook. There are browser-based image processing tools that do much more sophisticated tasks.
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Re: APOD: Orion Nebula: The Hubble View (2021 Jun 29)

Post by johnnydeep » Tue Jun 29, 2021 1:58 pm

Another great image made possible by the amazing Hubble. Sadly, Hubble is currently off-line as of June 13. Get well soon!

See https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/techands ... uxbndlbing

And https://hubblesite.org/contents/news-re ... s-2021-038

There are still many things that can be tried, and NASA has some real wizards working there!
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Re: APOD: Orion Nebula: The Hubble View (2021 Jun 29)

Post by rstevenson » Tue Jun 29, 2021 3:40 pm

Chris Peterson wrote:
Tue Jun 29, 2021 1:45 pm
The processing required is simple and could easily be done via browser scripting, even on some weak little Chromebook. There are browser-based image processing tools that do much more sophisticated tasks.
There is a famous online tool (which shall remain nameless), used within a browser to design objects—furniture, hardware, structures, whatever strikes your fancy—which promises a great deal and likely delivers it, to some users somewhere. It uses B&W line drawings and basic fill patterns and colours. And yet it’s almost uselessly slow and clunky in my not particularly slow and clunky iMac. When I think of that example of online image processing and apply it to what Victor was suggesting, I can’t imagine how bad such a tool would be within a browser. He suggests multiple B&W images, nice large astrophotographs I assume, being overlaid and each independently assigned a range of colours, adjustable via sliders. Even if the web interface is kept as simple as possible, you’ll still have to wait for the image processing to occur on the backend server and for the result to be sent over the always slower than you’re paying for network.

Perhaps some day in that bright future, we’ll all have network access to infinite processing power such that it matters not what device you use or where the device is in relation to your data files, but we ain’t there yet.

Rob

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Re: APOD: Orion Nebula: The Hubble View (2021 Jun 29)

Post by orin stepanek » Tue Jun 29, 2021 4:09 pm

OrionNebula_HubbleSerrano_960.jpg

What can I say; Orion is always beautiful and never disappoints! :mrgreen:
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Re: APOD: Orion Nebula: The Hubble View (2021 Jun 29)

Post by neufer » Thu Jul 01, 2021 4:12 pm

johnnydeep wrote:
Tue Jun 29, 2021 1:58 pm

Another great image made possible by the amazing Hubble.
Sadly, Hubble is currently off-line as of June 13. Get well soon!

See https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/techands ... uxbndlbing
And https://hubblesite.org/contents/news-re ... s-2021-038

There are still many things that can be tried, and NASA has some real wizards working there!
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
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Re: APOD: Orion Nebula: The Hubble View (2021 Jun 29)

Post by johnnydeep » Thu Jul 01, 2021 7:20 pm

neufer wrote:
Thu Jul 01, 2021 4:12 pm
johnnydeep wrote:
Tue Jun 29, 2021 1:58 pm

Another great image made possible by the amazing Hubble.
Sadly, Hubble is currently off-line as of June 13. Get well soon!

See https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/techands ... uxbndlbing
And https://hubblesite.org/contents/news-re ... s-2021-038

There are still many things that can be tried, and NASA has some real wizards working there!
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Thanks. Scott Manly produces some very well done and informative videos. No matter what happens, I really hope an effort is made to upgrade Hubble with a service mission at some point, the current absence of a Shuttle notwithstanding. It's still a very capable instrument, no matter how much better the JWST might end up being (I know they have different purposes). At the very least, if an upgrade/repair service mission proves impossible, NASA should boost the orbit to prevent Hubble from burning up ignominiously in the atmosphere in 10-15 more years.

I eagerly await Chris' response explaining why upgrading or boosting the orbit of Hubble would just be a waste of money better spent on newer missions :ssmile:
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Re: APOD: Orion Nebula: The Hubble View (2021 Jun 29)

Post by Chris Peterson » Thu Jul 01, 2021 7:45 pm

johnnydeep wrote:
Thu Jul 01, 2021 7:20 pm
neufer wrote:
Thu Jul 01, 2021 4:12 pm
johnnydeep wrote:
Tue Jun 29, 2021 1:58 pm

Another great image made possible by the amazing Hubble.
Sadly, Hubble is currently off-line as of June 13. Get well soon!

See https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/techands ... uxbndlbing
And https://hubblesite.org/contents/news-re ... s-2021-038

There are still many things that can be tried, and NASA has some real wizards working there!
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Thanks. Scott Manly produces some very well done and informative videos. No matter what happens, I really hope an effort is made to upgrade Hubble with a service mission at some point, the current absence of a Shuttle notwithstanding. It's still a very capable instrument, no matter how much better the JWST might end up being (I know they have different purposes). At the very least, if an upgrade/repair service mission proves impossible, NASA should boost the orbit to prevent Hubble from burning up ignominiously in the atmosphere in 10-15 more years.

I eagerly await Chris' response explaining why upgrading or boosting the orbit of Hubble would just be a waste of money better spent on newer missions :ssmile:
Well, there you go. That's probably true. The previous HST service missions cost more than replacing it would have. And a new service mission would probably have an even larger differential, given the absence of technology to readily access the HST and the ever decreasing cost of unmanned launches.
Chris

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Re: APOD: Orion Nebula: The Hubble View (2021 Jun 29)

Post by johnnydeep » Thu Jul 01, 2021 8:26 pm

Chris Peterson wrote:
Thu Jul 01, 2021 7:45 pm
johnnydeep wrote:
Thu Jul 01, 2021 7:20 pm
neufer wrote:
Thu Jul 01, 2021 4:12 pm
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Thanks. Scott Manly produces some very well done and informative videos. No matter what happens, I really hope an effort is made to upgrade Hubble with a service mission at some point, the current absence of a Shuttle notwithstanding. It's still a very capable instrument, no matter how much better the JWST might end up being (I know they have different purposes). At the very least, if an upgrade/repair service mission proves impossible, NASA should boost the orbit to prevent Hubble from burning up ignominiously in the atmosphere in 10-15 more years.

I eagerly await Chris' response explaining why upgrading or boosting the orbit of Hubble would just be a waste of money better spent on newer missions :ssmile:
Well, there you go. That's probably true. The previous HST service missions cost more than replacing it would have. And a new service mission would probably have an even larger differential, given the absence of technology to readily access the HST and the ever decreasing cost of unmanned launches.
Perhaps it will come to be seen to have historical value over and above any scientific cost effectiveness considerations, and will be deemed worth "saving" in some manner for that reason alone. A "national treasure" if you will.
--
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Re: APOD: Orion Nebula: The Hubble View (2021 Jun 29)

Post by Chris Peterson » Thu Jul 01, 2021 8:32 pm

johnnydeep wrote:
Thu Jul 01, 2021 8:26 pm
Chris Peterson wrote:
Thu Jul 01, 2021 7:45 pm
johnnydeep wrote:
Thu Jul 01, 2021 7:20 pm


Thanks. Scott Manly produces some very well done and informative videos. No matter what happens, I really hope an effort is made to upgrade Hubble with a service mission at some point, the current absence of a Shuttle notwithstanding. It's still a very capable instrument, no matter how much better the JWST might end up being (I know they have different purposes). At the very least, if an upgrade/repair service mission proves impossible, NASA should boost the orbit to prevent Hubble from burning up ignominiously in the atmosphere in 10-15 more years.

I eagerly await Chris' response explaining why upgrading or boosting the orbit of Hubble would just be a waste of money better spent on newer missions :ssmile:
Well, there you go. That's probably true. The previous HST service missions cost more than replacing it would have. And a new service mission would probably have an even larger differential, given the absence of technology to readily access the HST and the ever decreasing cost of unmanned launches.
Perhaps it will come to be seen to have historical value over and above any scientific cost effectiveness considerations, and will be deemed worth "saving" in some manner for that reason alone. A "national treasure" if you will.
The smartest way to save it is just to leave it in orbit (non-functional if it can't be fixed remotely) for recovery at some point in the future when that's an affordable option.
Chris

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Re: APOD: Orion Nebula: The Hubble View (2021 Jun 29)

Post by johnnydeep » Thu Jul 01, 2021 8:49 pm

Chris Peterson wrote:
Thu Jul 01, 2021 8:32 pm
johnnydeep wrote:
Thu Jul 01, 2021 8:26 pm
Chris Peterson wrote:
Thu Jul 01, 2021 7:45 pm

Well, there you go. That's probably true. The previous HST service missions cost more than replacing it would have. And a new service mission would probably have an even larger differential, given the absence of technology to readily access the HST and the ever decreasing cost of unmanned launches.
Perhaps it will come to be seen to have historical value over and above any scientific cost effectiveness considerations, and will be deemed worth "saving" in some manner for that reason alone. A "national treasure" if you will.
The smartest way to save it is just to leave it in orbit (non-functional if it can't be fixed remotely) for recovery at some point in the future when that's an affordable option.
Agreed. Though it will likely burn up in the atmosphere by the mid 2030s, so something might have to be done sooner than we would ideally like. Also, I'm not sure what happens if it should become a dead hunk of space debris and we can't control when and how it reenters the atmosphere. I assume boosting its orbit would be relatively cheap to do even if it becomes incommunicado?
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Re: APOD: Orion Nebula: The Hubble View (2021 Jun 29)

Post by neufer » Thu Jul 01, 2021 9:11 pm

johnnydeep wrote:
Thu Jul 01, 2021 8:26 pm
Chris Peterson wrote:
Thu Jul 01, 2021 7:45 pm
johnnydeep wrote:
Thu Jul 01, 2021 7:20 pm

I really hope an effort is made to upgrade Hubble with a service mission at some point, the current absence of a Shuttle notwithstanding. It's still a very capable instrument, no matter how much better the JWST might end up being (I know they have different purposes). At the very least, if an upgrade/repair service mission proves impossible, NASA should boost the orbit to prevent Hubble from burning up ignominiously in the atmosphere in 10-15 more years. I eagerly await Chris' response explaining why upgrading or boosting the orbit of Hubble would just be a waste of money better spent on newer missions :ssmile:
Well, there you go. That's probably true. The previous HST service missions cost more than replacing it would have. And a new service mission would probably have an even larger differential, given the absence of technology to readily access the HST and the ever decreasing cost of unmanned launches.
Perhaps it will come to be seen to have historical value over and above any scientific cost effectiveness considerations, and will be deemed worth "saving" in some manner for that reason alone. A "national treasure" if you will.
  • An orbiting space junk museum...what could go wrong :?:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nancy_Grace_Roman_Space_Telescope wrote: <<The Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope (shortened as Roman, and formerly the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope or WFIRST) is a NASA infrared space telescope currently under development. The Roman Space Telescope is based on an existing 2.4 m wide field of view primary mirror and will carry two scientific instruments. The Wide-Field Instrument (WFI) is a 300.8-megapixel multi-band visible and near-infrared camera, providing a sharpness of images comparable to that achieved by the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) over a 0.28 square degree field of view, 100 times larger than imaging cameras on HST. The Coronagraphic Instrument (CGI) is a high-contrast, small field of view camera and spectrometer covering visible and near-infrared wavelengths using novel starlight-suppression technology.

NASA announced the completion of the Preliminary Design Review (PDR) on November 1, 2019, but warned that though the mission remained on track for a 2025 launch date, shortfalls in the Senate's FY2020 budget proposal for Roman threatened to delay it further. The Trump administration proposed to defund the Nancy Grace Roman Space Telescope (then called WFIRST) in its FY2020 budget proposal to Congress. In testimony on March 27, 2019, NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine hinted that NASA would continue Roman after the James Webb Space Telescope, stating "WFIRST will be a critical mission when James Webb is on orbit".>>
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Re: APOD: Orion Nebula: The Hubble View (2021 Jun 29)

Post by johnnydeep » Fri Jul 02, 2021 2:58 pm

neufer wrote:
Thu Jul 01, 2021 9:11 pm
johnnydeep wrote:
Thu Jul 01, 2021 8:26 pm
Chris Peterson wrote:
Thu Jul 01, 2021 7:45 pm

Well, there you go. That's probably true. The previous HST service missions cost more than replacing it would have. And a new service mission would probably have an even larger differential, given the absence of technology to readily access the HST and the ever decreasing cost of unmanned launches.
Perhaps it will come to be seen to have historical value over and above any scientific cost effectiveness considerations, and will be deemed worth "saving" in some manner for that reason alone. A "national treasure" if you will.
  • An orbiting space junk museum...what could go wrong :?:
Hey, who said anything about it remaining in space? :P (Yeah, I know bringing it back to earth - intact - would be be extremely difficult and expensive, at least for the next decade or two, but perhaps it could be disassembled in orbit and brought back piecemeal...ok, time to go back on my meds..)
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Re: APOD: Orion Nebula: The Hubble View (2021 Jun 29)

Post by alter-ego » Sat Jul 17, 2021 11:20 pm

johnnydeep wrote:
Fri Jul 02, 2021 2:58 pm
neufer wrote:
Thu Jul 01, 2021 9:11 pm
johnnydeep wrote:
Thu Jul 01, 2021 8:26 pm


Perhaps it will come to be seen to have historical value over and above any scientific cost effectiveness considerations, and will be deemed worth "saving" in some manner for that reason alone. A "national treasure" if you will.
  • An orbiting space junk museum...what could go wrong :?:
Hey, who said anything about it remaining in space? :P (Yeah, I know bringing it back to earth - intact - would be be extremely difficult and expensive, at least for the next decade or two, but perhaps it could be disassembled in orbit and brought back piecemeal...ok, time to go back on my meds..)
Great news - Hubble is up and running.
NASA Returns Hubble Space Telescope to Science Operations wrote:NASA has returned the science instruments on the Hubble Space Telescope to operational status, and the collection of science data will now resume. This will be the first science data collected since the payload computer experienced a problem on June 13, which placed the instruments in a safe configuration and suspended science operations.
A pessimist is nothing more than an experienced optimist

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Re: APOD: Orion Nebula: The Hubble View (2021 Jun 29)

Post by Ann » Sun Jul 18, 2021 8:44 am

alter-ego wrote:
Sat Jul 17, 2021 11:20 pm

Great news - Hubble is up and running.
NASA Returns Hubble Space Telescope to Science Operations wrote:NASA has returned the science instruments on the Hubble Space Telescope to operational status, and the collection of science data will now resume. This will be the first science data collected since the payload computer experienced a problem on June 13, which placed the instruments in a safe configuration and suspended science operations.
Hooray!!! :D :clap:

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Re: APOD: Orion Nebula: The Hubble View (2021 Jun 29)

Post by johnnydeep » Sun Jul 18, 2021 12:26 pm

Ann wrote:
Sun Jul 18, 2021 8:44 am
alter-ego wrote:
Sat Jul 17, 2021 11:20 pm

Great news - Hubble is up and running.
NASA Returns Hubble Space Telescope to Science Operations wrote:NASA has returned the science instruments on the Hubble Space Telescope to operational status, and the collection of science data will now resume. This will be the first science data collected since the payload computer experienced a problem on June 13, which placed the instruments in a safe configuration and suspended science operations.
Hooray!!! :D :clap:

Ann
I second that - Woo Hoo! Great job NASA uber nerds :)
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Re: APOD: Orion Nebula: The Hubble View (2021 Jun 29)

Post by neufer » Sun Jul 18, 2021 3:50 pm

johnnydeep wrote:
Sun Jul 18, 2021 12:26 pm
Ann wrote:
Sun Jul 18, 2021 8:44 am
alter-ego wrote:
Sat Jul 17, 2021 11:20 pm

Great news - Hubble is up and running.
Hooray!!! :D :clap:
I second that - Woo Hoo! Great job NASA uber nerds :)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Premature_Burial wrote:
<<"The Premature Burial" is a horror short story by American writer Edgar Allan Poe, published in 1844 in The Philadelphia Dollar Newspaper. Its main character expresses concern about being buried alive.

In "The Premature Burial", the first-person unnamed narrator describes his struggle with things such as "attacks of the singular disorder which physicians have agreed to term catalepsy", a condition where he randomly falls into a death-like trance. This leads to his fear of being buried alive ("The true wretchedness", he says, is "to be buried while alive"). He emphasizes his fear by mentioning several people who have been buried alive. In the first case, the tragic accident was only discovered much later, when the victim's crypt was reopened. In others, victims revived and were able to draw attention to themselves in time to be freed from their ghastly prisons.

The narrator reviews these examples in order to provide context for his nearly crippling phobia of being buried alive. As he explains, his condition made him prone to slipping into a trance state of unconsciousness, a disease that grew progressively worse over time. He became obsessed with the idea that he would fall into such a state while away from home, and that his state would be mistaken for death. He extracts promises from his friends that they will not bury him prematurely, refuses to leave his home, and builds an elaborate tomb with equipment allowing him to signal for help in case he should awaken after "death".

The story culminates when the narrator awakens in pitch darkness. He presumes he has been buried alive, and all his precautions were to no avail. He cries out and is immediately hushed; he quickly realizes that he is in the berth of a small boat, not a grave. The event shocks him out of his obsession with death, and soon after, his catalepsy episodes cease entirely, leading him to suspect that they were a symptom of his phobia, rather than a cause.>>
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