Submissions: 2022 January

See new, spectacular, or mysterious sky images.
Bobinius
Ensign
Posts: 35
Joined: Thu Nov 14, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Submissions: 2022 January

Post by Bobinius » Sun Jan 16, 2022 4:32 pm

The Pleiades

Copyright: Bogdan Borz

Telescope: William Optics GT 71mm refractor 0.8x reducer
Camera ASI 2600MM, new EFW and OAG @ - 10°C
Baader LRGB 36mm filters
Mount AZEQ6 pro
Exposure : 9h 49 m
Location: Font Romeu, Pyrénées Mountains, France
L 54x180s, 11x300s
R 30x180s, 1x300s
G 29x180s, 10x300s
B 30x180s, 10x300s
SGP, Pixinsight, Photoshop
Full resolution: https://www.astrobin.com/full/c6kjiy/0/
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Bobinius
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Posts: 35
Joined: Thu Nov 14, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Submissions: 2022 January

Post by Bobinius » Sun Jan 16, 2022 4:37 pm

Filaments of Vela

Copyright: Bogdan Borz/Martin Pugh

Data acquistion and calibration: Martin Pugh
Post-treatment: Bogdan Borz

Ha 19 x 1800s
SII 21 x 1800s
OIII 11 x 1800s
R 4 x 600s
G 3 x 600s
B 3x600s
Total exposure : 27h 40m
Location: Heaven's Mirror Observatory, New South Wales, Australia
Telescope: Astro-physics Riccardi Honders 305mm
Camera: SBIG STXL 16200
Filters: Astrodon 5nm Ha, SII, OIII, RGB
Software: Pixinsight, Photoshop

Full resolution: https://www.astrobin.com/full/apun4g/0/
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dvd007
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Posts: 28
Joined: Wed Jul 08, 2015 7:54 am
Location: Saint Paul Lès Dax, France

Re: Submissions: 2022 January

Post by dvd007 » Sun Jan 16, 2022 6:29 pm


Rositsa
Asternaut
Posts: 5
Joined: Thu Nov 19, 2020 3:32 pm

Re: Submissions: 2022 January

Post by Rositsa » Sun Jan 16, 2022 6:47 pm

The Mineral Moon
URL: https://tripswithrosie.com
Copyright: Rositsa Dimitrova
Social: https://www.instagram.com/rosie.kerrigan/ December and January are perfect to photograph the true colours of the Moon - the so called Mineral Moon. Our beautiful satellite stands highest in the sky during these months. If you take a few dozen photos (or a video) and stack them together, you'll be able to see colours of the minerals - silica, iron, titanium and others. As the Moon reflects the very bright sunlight, we can't really see those with a naked eye.

Mike Siniscalchi
Ensign
Posts: 21
Joined: Mon Nov 01, 2010 2:27 am
Location: Long Island, NY

Submissions: 2022 January

Post by Mike Siniscalchi » Sun Jan 16, 2022 8:49 pm

IC63 & IC59 with Gamma Cassiopeiae
Captured using Astrodon RGB+HA filters, SBIG ST2000XM, TMB130 OTA, Losmandy G11.
Exposure times: (Ha) 18 x 10m (R) 6 x 10m (G) 6 x 10m (B) 10 x 10m, Bin 1x1
Software: Images Plus, Photoshop

More image details and a larger version can be found http://helixgate.net/ic63.html Copyright: Michael Siniscalchi

javier_gl
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Posts: 18
Joined: Thu Dec 08, 2016 5:42 pm

Re: Submissions: 2022 January

Post by javier_gl » Mon Jan 17, 2022 10:48 am

Ngc 1579, the Northern Trifid Nebula in Perseus.

Image

High-resolution image and technical data: http://www.javierlaina.es/IMAGENES/ngc1579.html

Javier Gómez Laina (Spain)
http://www.javierlaina.es/indexeng.html

rsaade
Asternaut
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2022 3:01 pm

Re: Submissions: 2022 January

Post by rsaade » Mon Jan 17, 2022 3:43 pm

Hi! This would be my first post here!

On January 15th, 2022, I was talking to a friend in Cozumel who works at the Planetarium. She mentioned that the ISS was going to be near Jupiter that night, and I quickly grabbed my phone and used Ed Morana's ISS Transit Prediction app (You can find it here:

https://play.google.com/store/apps/deta ... l=en&gl=US

And noticed that I was so lucky!! Soooo lucky that the transit was happening in 4 hours, just 10 minutes from my home driving, in a very accessible road!! The weather was not too promising, however. One of the weather apps said 40% cloudy at the time of the transit, others said less than 10%. But I got everything ready: laptop, ZWO camera, telescope, mount, etc and drove there, arriving at around 6:30PM. The transit would happen at exactly 7:08:15 PM (GMT-5), and would last only a fraction of a second! But I was ready! I had read a previous APOD (https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap200923.html) had used 0.35ms timing for every frame, and so I used those same settings!!

Here was the location of the transit:

Image

This image is the raw, unedited frame from which I placed the ISS back in its position on Jupiter:

Image

This image has more of the original, unedited, raw frames:

Image

ISS Crossing Jupiter Firmada by


Rene Saade, on Flickr

And this image is the stacked frames of Jupiter (in which we get to see Io) and the ISS, combined:

Image


ISS Transiting Jupiter Stacked Frames


by Rene Saade, on Flickr

The really neat thing is that the stacked frames show the Great Red Spot!! I was also lucky that the ISS transit happened at a time when the Great Red Spot was visible to us on Earth!

The raw frames are 0.35ms, gain 350, ZWO ASI290MM, no filters, on a CEM25P mount. 7:08:15PM (GMT-5), Cozumel, Quintana Roo, Mexico.

Tom Glenn
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Posts: 35
Joined: Sat Jan 25, 2020 6:56 pm

Re: Submissions: 2022 January

Post by Tom Glenn » Tue Jan 18, 2022 5:28 am

ImageA Hole in the Moon by Tom Glenn, on Flickr

This image shows the large impact crater Copernicus along the sunset terminator, with the eastern rim terraces still in sunlight but the crater floor completely shrouded in darkness. The prominent crater Kepler is on the left of the image, and extensive rays can be observed emanating from Kepler, Copernicus and Aristarchus (which is out of frame at upper left). The Hortensius domes region, formed by volcanic activity, is prominent near the center of the image. The image was captured August 24, 2019, at 06:07 local time (PDT) from San Diego, CA.

nicola montecchiari
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Posts: 64
Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2010 3:14 pm
Location: Milano, Italy

Re: Submissions: 2022 January

Post by nicola montecchiari » Tue Jan 18, 2022 6:12 pm

(7482) 1994 PC1
Copyright: Nicola Montecchiari
Asteroide1994PC1_cn.jpg
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Carballada
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Posts: 16
Joined: Sat Mar 16, 2019 10:19 am

Re: Submissions: 2022 January

Post by Carballada » Wed Jan 19, 2022 8:43 am

Image

Sh2-224 in natural colors by Jose Carballada, on Flickr

Description of this object from waid-observatory.com :
Sh2-224 is a very faint supernova remnant located approximately 14,700 lightyears distant in the constellation Auriga. This unusual celestial object is also designated VRO 42.05.01 and has been the object of considerable research using both ground based and space based telescopes including the ROSAT and the Dominion Radio Astronomy Observatory. The nebula created by the supernova explosion is composed of two visual parts. It is postulated the supernova explosion created a bubble like structure. (Visible in the 'botton right' of the image.) As the shockwave from the explosion progressed into a very low density region of the interstellar medium, a "wing" component was expelled. (Visible in the 'top right' of the image.)

wrightdobbs
Asternaut
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed Jan 19, 2022 10:42 pm

Re: Submissions: 2022 January

Post by wrightdobbs » Wed Jan 19, 2022 11:00 pm

Starlink Satellite launch from Florida on the evening of January 18, 2022 as they fly below the Orion Constellation.

Composite image.

Foreground and trail are 5 84 second images stitched together with a 20mm lens and Sony a7ii.
Background is two image panorama with a 14mm lens to get the Orion Constellation in frame.

https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/518 ... d206_k.jpg
https://twitter.com/WrightDobbs
https://www.facebook.com/wrightdobbsphotography
https://instagram.com/wrightdobbs
Last edited by bystander on Wed Jan 19, 2022 11:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Please, no hot links to images > 500 kb. Substituted smaller image.

Kinch
Science Officer
Posts: 157
Joined: Sat Mar 19, 2016 1:53 pm

Re: Submissions: 2022 January

Post by Kinch » Thu Jan 20, 2022 10:33 am

.

It doesn't have to be in colour to be true....

Fascinating SH2-284
SH2-284 Mono (1350 x 1800).jpg
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isasastroatelier
Asternaut
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2022 9:28 am

Re: Submissions: 2022 January

Post by isasastroatelier » Thu Jan 20, 2022 10:53 am

Rosette Nebula
URL website: https://isasastroatelier.ch Location: backyard, Switzerland
Date & time: 14 January 2022, 00:48 – 01:30 a.m.
3 x 600s in H-alpha
Filter: Astrodon Ha 5nm 31
Telescope: Takahashi FSQ-85EDX
Camera: QSI683wsg8 (monochrome)

mikiclinic
Ensign
Posts: 46
Joined: Tue Oct 18, 2011 3:36 pm

Re: Submissions: 2022 January

Post by mikiclinic » Thu Jan 20, 2022 2:55 pm

The change of C/2021 A1 (Leonard) DEC.31.2021 to Jan 4. 2022
This Image was taken with ASA inch f3.6 &FLI ML16200 CCD /2pannel Mosaic image/ SSO remote observatory from Japan
http://miki-hosp.or.jp/BIND/
Copyright: Nobuhiko Miki

asro8042
Asternaut
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed Aug 25, 2021 8:36 pm

Re: Submissions: 2022 January

Post by asro8042 » Thu Jan 20, 2022 6:44 pm

A fiery bubble and Planetary Nebula
A wide view of the Bubble Nebula and a Planetary nebula (KjPn8) in the constellation Cassiopeia. The Bubble Nebula (NGC 7635) is a HII, emission nebula with the bubble created by the large and hot central star (BD+60˚ 2522) which in the top image is located in the lower part of the bubble. Towers of HII emission can be seen all around the bubble pointing towards the central star. The planetary nebula KjPN8 (PN G 112.5-00.1) is an interesting and unusual planetary nebula. It's located in the upper right of the image. It has a bipolar lobe of about 14 arcmin in size. The central star and core of the planetary nebula is a very small 3-4 arc sec. It's very red and seems to have a ring of HII emission around it. (See the KjPN8 crop above). Click on this image to see the full resolution view and the small core of the planetary nebula. There are several theories about how this planetary nebula formed. New research using ground based and the Hubble Space Telescope points to two separate events. Two bipolar stars essentially creating two planetary nebula. Its one of the largest bipolar lobes known and may be one of the only objects of this type discovered. KjPn8 was discovered in 1971 by M.A. Kazaryn and E.h. Pavsamyan. I collected 19hrs of Ha and OIII data on this object. However it has very little OIII and mainly emits in the HII spectrum.
https://www.starscapeimaging.com/Bubble ... KjPn8.html
Copyright: Jonathan Talbot
Image
Image

andreave
Asternaut
Posts: 1
Joined: Thu Jan 20, 2022 9:16 pm

Re: Submissions: 2022 January

Post by andreave » Thu Jan 20, 2022 9:29 pm

HI everyone,

Here is my submit for APOD

Imagenothern lights APOD by Andrea VE, sur Flickr

« It has been a long time since we have seen such a beautiful and spectacular solar flare. The material ejected with fury by our Star is now heading towards the Earth and its magnetic field, which it should tickle tomorrow. This is good news for aurora enthusiasts, and of course, photographers who hunt them. Because the shock of the CME (Coronal Mass Ejection) on the magnetosphere, followed by the interaction of solar particles with those of the upper atmosphere, should be visible in sumptuous dances of auroras from this Saturday, October 30, after the plasma has covered the 150 million kilometers that separate us »
This image was taken on 1st November 9.00pm, near Akureyri in Iceland. We were so exiting to see such a spectacle that we run out with a camera and forget to switched off the lights and close the door, those lights that give this image a specific atmosphere.

Thanks Earth, we won’t forget this moment.

Instagram : @andreave71
flickr : https://flic.kr/p/2mYb2Tw

barretosmed
Science Officer
Posts: 344
Joined: Thu Oct 12, 2017 6:04 pm

Re: Submissions: 2022 January

Post by barretosmed » Fri Jan 21, 2022 11:19 pm

Messier 75 (also known as NGC 6864)


It is a globular cluster located in the constellation Sagittarius, 67,500 light-years from Earth.

BEST DETAILS:
https://www.astrobin.com/full/jwrqtx/0/

EQUIPMENT:
ZWO ASI 6200MC COLED
Esprit 150mm
Mount CEM60
86 x 100'' exposure
08/03/2021
Location: Jales - SP - Brazil

Author: Fernando Oliveira de Menezes
(Organizing author of the book Amateur Astrophotography in Brazil)
https://clubedeautores.com.br/livro/ast ... -no-brasil

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MrRat
Ensign
Posts: 20
Joined: Sat Jul 24, 2021 11:37 am

Giant Space Eyebrow

Post by MrRat » Sat Jan 22, 2022 12:16 am

The helix Nebula, NGC7293
Taken November 9th, 2021 from my backyard.
22 shots at 600 seconds each from my backyard with a ZWO ASI2600MC camera, William Optics GT81 telescope, and Losmandy GM811G equatorial mount.
211109 NGC7293 22@600 RTU.jpg
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tommasostella
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Posts: 33
Joined: Mon Nov 11, 2019 4:34 pm

Re: Submissions: 2022 January

Post by tommasostella » Sat Jan 22, 2022 2:37 pm

The Baby Eagle nebula
https://www.facebook.com/tommaso.m.stella
Copyright: Tommaso Massimo Stella
From: Taranto (ITALY)

Lights: 26x900s, total exposure: 6,5 h
Telescope: Takahashi FS-60CB + Reducer 0,72x
Camera: QHY 168C
Filters: Optolong Astronomy Filter L-CCD
Mount: Skywatcher AZ-EQ6 GT
Processing: DeepSkyStacker, PixInsight, Photoshop CC
LBN777-TommasoStellaSky.jpg
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Bobinius
Ensign
Posts: 35
Joined: Thu Nov 14, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Submissions: 2022 January

Post by Bobinius » Sun Jan 23, 2022 12:24 pm

The Southern Pinwheel Galaxy M83

Copyright: Bogdan Borz


Telecope: Planewave CDK 24"
Camera: FLI Proline 9000
Total exposure: 10h50'
Dates : Multiple nights Feb - Aug 2021
Location: El Sauce Observatory, Rio Hurtado Valley, Coquimbo, Chile
L 16 x 600s
R 6 x 300s 14 x 600s
G 6 x 300s 13 x 600s
B 6 x 300s 13 x 600s

Telescope Live calibrated dataset
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dvd007
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Posts: 28
Joined: Wed Jul 08, 2015 7:54 am
Location: Saint Paul Lès Dax, France

Re: Submissions: 2022 January

Post by dvd007 » Sun Jan 23, 2022 8:11 pm

Telescope 200/1000 PERL
Rapport F/D 5
Mount AZEQ6GT PRO
Camera ZWO 1600MM PRO
Exposure 6h
Location Saint Paul Lès Dax, France
L 42x300s
R 10x300s
G 10x300s
B 10x300s
SGP, Pixinsight, Photoshop

ImageM78 by David Duarte, sur Flickr

astronut2007
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Posts: 39
Joined: Thu Feb 02, 2012 1:07 pm

Re: Submissions: 2022 January

Post by astronut2007 » Sun Jan 23, 2022 8:49 pm

WOLF MOON & THE BELT OF VENUS

Copyright: Alan C Tough

The Wolf Moon of January 2022, seen here rising through the Belt of Venus. Photographed in Elgin, Moray, Scotland on January 17.

Highest resolution image here:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/7776810@N07/51838642026/

Yovin Yahathugoda
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Posts: 20
Joined: Tue Feb 09, 2021 2:56 pm

Re: Submissions: 2022 January

Post by Yovin Yahathugoda » Mon Jan 24, 2022 7:45 pm

M78 2-panel mosaic

https://www.astrobin.com/users/YovinRY/
Copyright: Yovin Yahathugoda


This image was taken using Telescope Live CHI-1 telescope in El Sauce Observatory, Chile.

Full quality version here: https://cdn.astrobin.com/images/86236/2 ... 78a281.jpg

Telescope - Planewave CDK24
Camera - FLI ProLine PL9000
Filters - Astrodon E-Series RGB
Software - Photoshop 2020 & PixInsight
Location - El Sauce Observatory, Chile

Lum - Synthetic luminance
Red - 36x600s
Green - 36x600s
Blue - 36x600s
Total Exposure time - 18 hours
Full acquisition details at https://www.astrobin.com/7bncfi/0/

LeftyAstro
Asternaut
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Jan 12, 2022 2:41 am

Re: Submissions: 2022 January

Post by LeftyAstro » Mon Jan 24, 2022 9:08 pm

ImageLDN 1622, Barnard's Loop and M78 by Markice Stephenson, on Flickr

~20 nights, 30 hours in HaRGB from Los Angeles
using:

Celestron RASA 8, ZWO 294MM, and Baader's Ha (ultra narrowband) + RGB filters

Thank you,

Markice S

https://instagram.com/leftyastro

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the_astronomy_enthusiast
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Posts: 50
Joined: Fri Apr 16, 2021 10:16 pm

Re: Submissions: 2022 January

Post by the_astronomy_enthusiast » Wed Jan 26, 2022 12:29 am

Image
A cluster of rampant star formation and glowing gas: The Great Nebula in Orion by William Ostling, on Flickr

Full write up here: https://theastroenthusiast.com/a-luminous-m42/
The first image of my new mount! The GEM28 has turned out to be an incredibly accurate mount, giving me sharp stars at 600mm with 4 minute exposures!

The Great Orion Nebula, an immense, nearby starbirth region, is probably the most famous of all astronomical nebulas. Here, glowing gas surrounds hot young stars at the edge of an immense interstellar molecular cloud only 1500 light-years away. The bright core illuminates the surrounding the star cluster, highlighting the streams of dark dust on top.

Website: https://theastroenthusiast.com/
Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/the_astronomy_enthusiast/