Submissions: 2022 February

See new, spectacular, or mysterious sky images.
asro8042
Asternaut
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed Aug 25, 2021 8:36 pm

Re: Submissions: 2022 February

Post by asro8042 » Sun Feb 13, 2022 5:26 pm

M82-The Starburst Galaxy
Copyright: Jonathan Talbot

The incredible M82 with its huge amount of hydrogen emission due to massive star formation near its core. This M82, super wind, as it's sometimes called, extends a long way from the galaxy. There is even a hint of a bow shock of material, also known as the cap, well to the north of M82 which is near the top of the image and shown as a small area of HII emission. This bow shock has been the subject of several papers and located 35,000 light years above the galaxy.

Image

High res and image exposure details available here:https://www.starscapeimaging.com/M82_Jan21/M82.html

Equipment: Stellarvue SVX 152T refractor, ZWO ASI 6200 camera

Mntscll7
Asternaut
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Feb 14, 2022 8:50 am

Re: Submissions: 2022 February

Post by Mntscll7 » Mon Feb 14, 2022 7:54 pm

Dear Editors,

here is my C/2021 A1 Leonard capture crossing M3 last December 3 from my backyard in Barcelona (Catalonia). It was a very special night and a very special capture for me, cos since I never thought I could capture a moment as magical as this with my equipment under a Bortle 8 sky. :ssmile:

Image

Full size: https://i.postimg.cc/G2FqRnG0/Leonardandm3.png

Skywatcher 72 ED / EQ 3-2
Zwo Asi 120 mini guide
Canon 600D unmodified.
CLS Optolong Filter
December 3rd , 2021 (Barcelona, Catalonia)

skywondersie
Asternaut
Posts: 3
Joined: Sat Jul 11, 2020 10:33 pm

Re: Submissions: 2022 February

Post by skywondersie » Mon Feb 14, 2022 11:49 pm

The Andromeda Galaxy alongside with M32 and M110.
As part of Andromeda, towards the bottom left, it can be seen as a blue haze, NGC206, the largest and brightest star cloud in Andromeda.
Across the disk of Andromeda, many bright regions can be spotted marking regions rich in Hydrogen, typically associated to star formation regions.
Copyright: Antonio Martin-Carrillo
https://skywonders.ie

Image taken from the DeepSkyWest robotic observatory
Astro-Physics RH-305
LRGB processed with PI 1.8

blastrophoto
Asternaut
Posts: 8
Joined: Sun Nov 14, 2021 9:54 pm

Re: Submissions: 2022 February

Post by blastrophoto » Tue Feb 15, 2022 3:19 pm

LDN1622 - THE BOOGIEMAN NEBULA This is the Boogieman Nebula, otherwise known as Lynds' Dark Nebula (LDN) 1622, which appears against a faint background of glowing hydrogen gas only visible in long telescopic exposures of the region. In contrast, the brighter reflection nebula vdB 62 is more easily seen, just above and right of center. LDN 1622 lies near the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy, close on the sky to Barnard's Loop, a large cloud surrounding the rich complex of emission nebulae found in the Belt and Sword of Orion. With swept-back outlines, the obscuring dust of LDN 1622 is thought to lie at a similar distance, perhaps 1,500 light-years away.

This image came in at 37.75 hours of total exposure time from my suburban backyard (Bortle 6). I've spent the last month or so collecting data on this one and I was pleasantly surprised with how much this popped from the backyard considering the conditions. A ton of light pollution gradients to work through and some moon gradient as well. Once I got the image as flat as I could, I worked through nine revisions before calling this final. As you can see I leaned toward a pinkish tones in HA rather than deep reds. I felt this gave the image as a whole a more natural broadband appearance.

Gear:
Explore Scientific ED127 FCD100 F7.5 952mm
QHY 294M-Pro
Optolong 2" 7nm HA filter
Optolong 2" RGB filters
Skywatcher EQ6-R Pro Mount
QHY EFW
QHY OAG-M
ASI120M Guide Cam

Captured: January 27th to February 11th

Integration:
189x300s - HA
220x120s - R
220x120s - G
220x120s - B
Total = 37.75hrs

Location:
Woodbridge, VA (Bortle 6)

Michael Tz
Asternaut
Posts: 6
Joined: Mon Jan 31, 2022 5:19 pm

Re: Submissions: 2022 February

Post by Michael Tz » Tue Feb 15, 2022 3:59 pm

International Space Station from the earth.
From my backyard telescope.
It was a challenge to shoot that image, it was going really fast in the sky!
https://www.instagram.com/your.daily.astro/
Michael
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wrightdobbs
Asternaut
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed Jan 19, 2022 10:42 pm

Re: Submissions: 2022 February

Post by wrightdobbs » Tue Feb 15, 2022 7:16 pm

Milky Way Season is beginning as the Milky Way rises in the early morning before sunrise.

This image was captured on a recent vacation of mine at 5:30am in the morning on a flight north out of Jacksonville, FL on February 10, 2022. Venus and Mercury are seen in this frame (Mercury just barely above the horizon).

Capture Details: 8 exposures of the sky stacked together to reduce noise. Base images were captured with a Viltrox 20mm lens, Sony a7ii, f/2.8, ISO 10,000 and 6 second exposures.
https://twitter.com/WrightDobbs
https://www.facebook.com/wrightdobbsphotography
https://instagram.com/wrightdobbs

This is my second time posting, please let me know if I didn't adhere to guidelines this second go around.

aalreesh
Asternaut
Posts: 8
Joined: Tue Feb 08, 2022 10:45 am

Re: Submissions: 2022 February

Post by aalreesh » Tue Feb 15, 2022 8:08 pm

While waiting for the Tiangong Space Station to transit the sun i took a 10,000 frame image of the activity in the area. I wanted to see how much data i could stack before losing information. Surprisingly I made it to 5000 images before my laptop decided to take a break as processing the transit and other images was too much. this was taken from Kuwait at 4:58pm a few minutes before the transit which i will hopefully upload soon.

please feel free to check out my other work on my instagram page @mi7sen

image was captured with a Lunt Ls100MT, Rainbow RST 135 mount, ZWO ASI 174mm and Televue 2.5x barlow

Thank you!

Abdulmohsen Alreesh
5000_frames[1].jpg
https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachments/ ... frames.jpg
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moladso
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Posts: 29
Joined: Sun Oct 03, 2010 11:22 am

Re: Submissions: 2022 February

Post by moladso » Wed Feb 16, 2022 12:33 am

Colorfull Imbrium & Copernicus area - 11.60 days moon
As a result of the combination of a monochrome image and a natural color image the mineral dominant composition of the surface of the moon is revealed for each area.

https://www.astronomica.es/imagen.asp?i ... d_prod=538
Copyright: Jaime Fernández - astronomica.es
https://www.astronomica.es/imagen/538_2.jpg
538_2[1].jpg
Full resolution image link: https://www.astronomica.es/imagen_big.a ... &from=true

Technical Details:
Location: Valdemorillo - Spain
Date:12/02/2022 (dd/mm/yyyy)
Conditions: Bad (light clouds, very stable atmosphere)
Temperature: 10ºC
Humidity: High
Telescope: Vixen 102M f/9.8
Reducer/corrector: Celestron Ultima SV Barlow 2x
Filter: Astronomik R Type-II
Mount: Orion Atlas EQG
Camera: DMK 23U618 (monochrome) and Canon 350D (color)
Exposure: 14 images mosaic x 2000 exposures @9fps 16bit + color moon image
Procesing: Autostakert + Registax + PixInsight
Procesing based on Mr. Alain Paillou technique for lunar color images.

Explanation of field covered (source: wikipedia)
Moon area covering Mare Imbrium, Plato, Sinus Iridum, Copernicus, Kepler, Montes Appeninus, Mare Procellarum, Sinus Aestuum, Mare Insularum,... on a 14 images mosaic.

As a result of the combination of a monochrome image (used as luminance on this processing technique) and a highly saturated natural color image (used as RGB) the mineral dominant composition of the surface of the moon is revealed for each area.

Mare Imbrium (Latin for "Sea of Showers" or "Sea of Rains") is a vast lava plain within the Imbrium Basin on the Moon and is one of the larger craters in the Solar System. The Imbrium Basin formed from the collision of a proto-planet during the Late Heavy Bombardment. Basaltic lava later flooded the giant crater to form the flat volcanic plain seen today. The basin's age has been estimated using uranium–lead dating methods to 3938 ± 4 million years ago.
With a diameter of 1145 km, Mare Imbrium is second only to Oceanus Procellarum in size among the maria, and it is the largest mare associated with an impact basin.

Sinus Iridum (Latin "Bay of Rainbows") is a plain of basaltic lava that forms a northwestern extension to the Mare Imbrium. It is surrounded from the northeast to the southwest by the Montes Jura range. The protruding part of the range at the southwest end is named Promontorium Heraclides, while that at the northeast end is called Promontorium Laplace. This bay and the surrounding mountains is considered one of the most beautiful features on the Moon, and is a favorite among lunar observers.
Sinus Iridum is formed from the remains of a large impact crater, which was subsequently flooded with basaltic lava, inundating the "sea" wall. The bay itself does not contain any notable impact craters, but does include the satellite crater Heraclides E in the south, Laplace A along the eastern edge, and Bianchini G in the north. The surface is level, but is marked by a number of wrinkle ridges (dorsa).

Plato is a lava-filled lunar impact crater on the Moon. Its diameter is 101 km. It is located on the northeastern shore of the Mare Imbrium, at the western extremity of the Montes Alpes mountain range. In the mare to the south are several rises collectively named the Montes Teneriffe. To the north lies the wide stretch of the Mare Frigoris. East of the crater, among the Montes Alpes, are several rilles collectively named the Rimae Plato.
The age of Plato is about 3,840 million years, only slightly younger than the Mare Imbrium to the south. The rim is irregular with 2-km-tall jagged peaks that project prominent shadows across the crater floor when the Sun is at a low angle. Sections of the inner wall display signs of past slumping, most notably a large triangular slide along the western side. The rim of Plato is circular, but from the Earth it appears oval due to foreshortening.
The flat floor of Plato has a relatively low albedo, making it appear dark in comparison to the surrounding rugged terrain. The floor is free of significant impact craters and lacks a central peak. However, there are a few small craterlets scattered across the floor.

Copernicus is a young and isolated formation with hexagonal form.
Shows bright rays all around. Very steep slopes dominant Mare Insularum of 900 m, tormented and supporting Fauth to the South and Gay-Lussac to the North. Floor flatter to the North that to the South. Three central mountains (1200 m). Hills and ruins in the arena.

Kepler is a lunar impact crater that lies between the Oceanus Procellarum to the west and Mare Insularum in the east. It is most notable for the prominent ray system that covers the surrounding mare. The rays extend for well over 300 kilometers, overlapping the rays from other craters.
One of the rays from Tycho, when extended across the Oceanus Procellarum, intersects this crater. This was a factor in the choice of the crater's name when Giovanni Riccioli was creating his system of lunar nomenclature, as Kepler used the observations of Tycho Brahe while devising his three laws of planetary motion. Due to its prominent rays, Kepler is mapped as part of the Copernican System.

Sinus Aestuum forms a northeastern extension to Mare Insularum. The Sinus Aestuum is a level, nearly featureless surface of low albedo basaltic lava that is marked by a few small impacts and some wrinkle ridges. The eastern border is formed by an area of irregular terrain that divides the bay from the Mare Vaporum to the east. To the north is the Montes Apenninus range and the prominent crater Eratosthenes. Along the western side is the flooded crater Stadius and the Mare Insularum to the southwest.
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mathewbrowne
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Re: Submissions: 2022 February

Post by mathewbrowne » Wed Feb 16, 2022 1:11 pm

ImageCastell Coch - Exterior, United Kingdom © Mathew Browne via PhotoHound

The International Space Station glides over the fairytale castle Castell Coch in Wales.

tinmar_g
Asternaut
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Jan 12, 2022 9:12 pm

Re: Submissions: 2022 February

Post by tinmar_g » Wed Feb 16, 2022 2:28 pm

Image
Lucky shot, big meteor above Pleiades and the observatory by Martin Giraud

Here is one of the biggest meteor I had the luck to capture !

I has been shot last august at the Cosmodrome Observatory located in South of France. It was near to the peak of the meteor shower of Perséides. I was doing a timelapse when it occurred.

Just below the shot there is the Pleiades cluster.

Settings :
- ISO-4000
- F/1.8
- 10 sec exposure

Equipment :
- Canon 6D
- Sigma ART 50mm

@tinmar_g

barretosmed
Science Officer
Posts: 344
Joined: Thu Oct 12, 2017 6:04 pm

Re: Submissions: 2022 February

Post by barretosmed » Wed Feb 16, 2022 10:22 pm

THE JEWEL BOX CLUSTER (also known as NGC 4755, Kappa Crucis Cluster and Caldwell 94)


Open star cluster, located 6,445 light-years from Earth, in the constellation of the Southern Cross (Crux).
It was called the Jewel Box by the English astronomer John Herschel, who described it as a “coffin of gemstones of various colours”, noting that “this cluster, while neither large nor rich, is an exceptionally bright and beautiful object when viewed through an instrument of aperture sufficient to show distinctly the very different color of its constituent stars, which give it the effect of a superb piece of fancy jewelry.”

BEST DETAILS:
https://www.astrobin.com/full/07afg0/B/

EQUIPMENT:
ZWO ASI 6200MC COLED
Esprit 150mm
Mount CEM60
53x 100'' exposure
08/01/2021
Location: Jales - SP - Brazil

Author: Fernando Oliveira de Menezes
(Organizing author of the book Amateur Astrophotography in Brazil)
https://clubedeautores.com.br/livro/ast ... -no-brasil
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Mike Siniscalchi
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Joined: Mon Nov 01, 2010 2:27 am
Location: Long Island, NY

Re: Submissions: 2022 February

Post by Mike Siniscalchi » Thu Feb 17, 2022 3:07 am

SH2-216 - Large Planetary Nebula in Perseus
This is a 12 panel bicolor mosaic using mapped colors of Ha (red) + OIII (blue) and a synthetic green (Ha + OIII)
Captured using Baader Ha & OII filters, SBIG ST10XME, TMB130 OTA, Losmandy G11
Exposure times: Ha-18x15m OIII-18x 15m Bin 1x1 per each 12 mosaic panel
Software: Sequence Generator Pro, CCDStack, Astro Pixel Processor, Photoshop


More image details can be found at: http://helixgate.net/sh2-216.html
A larger size with a mouse over to display the Moon to scale can be found at: http://helixgate.net/sh2-216_Moon.html Copyright: Michael Siniscalchi

sendhilchinnasamy
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Posts: 16
Joined: Fri Sep 17, 2021 7:31 pm

Re: Submissions: 2022 February

Post by sendhilchinnasamy » Fri Feb 18, 2022 5:27 pm

Widefield image of the Orion constellation

This high-resolution composite image of the Orion constellation was shot over three months over many clear nights in 2021 and 2022.

The circular red filament that is prominent as an arc is the Barnard's loop.

Towards the bottom left is the Boogieman nebula also known as LDN1622 that appears against a background of hydrogen gas.

On the other side of the Barnard's loop is M78 that is soaked in interstellar dust clouds and glowing nebulae. Flecks of emission from Herbig-Haro objects stand out against the dark dust lanes.

Located towards the left-center of this image is the iconic horsehead nebula. Its feature is dark as it is a dust clouds that lines in front of the bright red emission nebula and the red color is due to the hydrogen gas. The flame nebula contains filaments of dark dust. Below the horsehead nebula is a blueish reflection nebula that reflects blue light from nearby stars.

On the right-center of this image is the Great Orion nebula. This stellar nursery has been known to many different cultures throughout human history. The nebula is only 1,500 light-years away, making it the closest large star-forming region to Earth.

Towards the bottom right of this image is the Angel nebula, a faint region that reflects light of nearby stars and has dark dust lanes in the backdrop of colorful stars.

Total exposure: 53 hours
Location: Georgetown, Texas

Image

Tom Glenn
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Posts: 35
Joined: Sat Jan 25, 2020 6:56 pm

Re: Submissions: 2022 February

Post by Tom Glenn » Sun Feb 20, 2022 8:32 am

Montes, Maria, and Apollo 15
ImageMontes, Maria, and Apollo 15 by Tom Glenn, on Flickr

The Apollo 15 landing site is located just below the center of this detailed image that includes a large number of prominent lunar features.

Full size image link

Apollo 15 landing site (cropped and labeled image)

Starting from the upper left and proceeding in a clockwise direction, we see three large mountain ranges that partially encircle Mare Imbrium: Montes Alpes, Montes Caucasus, and Montes Apenninus. Prominent craters include the dark floored Plato (upper left), the striking pair of Aristoteles and Eudoxus (at top in deep shadow along the sunset terminator), and Archimedes (to the west of the Apenninus range). Mare Serenitatis is on the right of the image, with Mare Imbrium at left, Mare Vaporum at bottom, and Mare Frigoris at top. The Apollo 15 landing site is located along the western edge of Montes Apenninus, adjacent to Rima Hadley. Of course, no details of the landing site itself are visible from Earth, but we can nevertheless clearly see the general location. This can be compared to orbital images of the region, including those taken by the Apollo 15 metric mapping camera, as well as more recent images from LROC (also see here).

Image details:
Date captured: 9/30/2018, 04:54 PDT
Location: San Diego, CA
Telescope: C9.25 Edge HD
Camera: ASI183mm
Filter: green
Frames stacked: 1000

Thierry Legault
Ensign
Posts: 79
Joined: Wed May 26, 2010 4:45 pm

Re: Submissions: 2022 February

Post by Thierry Legault » Sun Feb 20, 2022 7:51 pm

I am virtually sure that it's the most detailed ISS lunar transit to date 😊

Larger images:
http://www.astrophoto.fr/transit_iss_mo ... rop_fb.jpg
http://www.astrophoto.fr/transit_iss_mo ... 118_fb.jpg
http://www.astrophoto.fr/transit_iss_mo ... ion_fb.jpg

Many modules and spacecrafts are visible, in particular the SpaceX Crex-3 Dragon.
I had to ride 250 km from home and find a remote place in the countryside in the center of the transit path, in the middle of the night between the blankets of fog.

The transit (prepared on www.transit-finder.com) lasted only 1/2 second, at the speed of 27000 km/h.

Tycho crater near the ISS is 85 km wide and one of the youngest craters on the Moon ("only" 100 million years old). The large surrounding rays were caused by the impact of an asteroid comparable in size to the body that caused the extinction of the dinosaurs.
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moladso
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Posts: 29
Joined: Sun Oct 03, 2010 11:22 am

Re: Submissions: 2022 February

Post by moladso » Sun Feb 20, 2022 9:56 pm

Da Vinci glow - 5.75 days moon - photomontage
Photomontage combination of one 6 images mosaic moon for illuminated area (5.75 days) plus a near full moon 18 image mosaic for dark area simulating moon glow (earthshine)

https://www.astronomica.es/imagen.asp?i ... d_prod=539
Copyright: Jaime Fernández - astronomica.es
Moon_2000x2000.jpg
Technical Details:
Location: Valdemorillo - Spain
Date: 27/feb/2021 + 17/Apr/2021
Conditions: Normal
Telescope: Vixen 102M f/9.8
Filter: Baader UV-IR cut
Mount: Orion Atlas EQG
Camera: DMK 21AU618
Exposure: 2000 frames @60fps x18 (full moon) / @30fps x6 (crescent moon)
Procesing: AutoStakkert 64 3.0.14 + Registax 6.0 (N3) + PixInsight 1.8 Ripley

Explanation of field covered
Earthshine is also sometimes called "ashen glow", the "old Moon in the new Moon's arms", or the "Da Vinci glow", after Leonardo da Vinci, who explained the phenomenon for the first time in recorded history.

Planetshine is the dim illumination, by sunlight reflected from a planet, of all or part of the otherwise dark side of any moon orbiting the body. Planetlight is the diffuse reflection of sunlight from a planet.

Earthshine is visible earthlight reflected from the Moon's night side. It's the equivalent on the moon surface of the earth moonlight on a full moon night. The bright region is directly illuminated by the Sun, while the rest of the Moon is illuminated by sunlight reflected from Earth.

Leonardo da Vinci explained the phenomenon in the early 16th century when he realized that both Earth and the Moon reflect sunlight at the same time.

Image #1: Full moon image link: https://www.astronomica.es/imagen.asp?i ... d_prod=489
Lunation: 16.09 days
Distance: 365340 Km
Apparent diameter: 32.71'
Illumination: 99.6%
Libration in Latitude: -06°08'
Libration in Longitude: -03°10'
Position angle: 23.1°
18 images mosaic

Image #2: Crescent moon image link: https://www.astronomica.es/imagen.asp?i ... d_prod=494
Distance: 398083Km
Apparent diameter: 30,02'
Illumination: 26,9%
Libration in Latitude: -01°37'
Libration in Longitude: -05°53'
Position angle: 1.5°
6 images mosaic
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astrosirius
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Posts: 92
Joined: Fri Nov 23, 2012 11:17 am
Location: Barcelona Spain

Re: Submissions: 2022 February

Post by astrosirius » Sun Feb 20, 2022 11:09 pm

NGC 4216 - Spiral Galaxy in Virgo & filaments.

NGC 4216 is one of the largest and brightest spiral galaxies of the Virgo Cluster.

NGC 4216 seems to be in a place of the Virgo cluster where dwarf galaxies are being destroyed/accreted at a high rate, with it suffering many interactions with these type of galaxies.
Filaments-Structures-Acreation-NGC-4216-APOD.jpg
NGC-4216-APOD.jpg
Filaments-Structures-Acreation-NGC-4216.jpg
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aalreesh
Asternaut
Posts: 8
Joined: Tue Feb 08, 2022 10:45 am

Re: Submissions: 2022 February

Post by aalreesh » Mon Feb 21, 2022 2:50 pm

Solar activity February 21st 2022 around 10am local time.
Imaged from Kuwait City

Equipment used:
Lunt LS100MT solar telescope
Zwo asi174mm planetary camera
Televue 2.5x barlow
Rainbow rst135 mount

One of the most beautiful things I have learnt about solar astrophotography is that the sun does no wait for you. While planets may change over time and details do alter, the sun is ever changing and one day may be relatively quiet while another is full of activity. Today I was lucky, I managed to image over 2 hours collecting data for a timelapse only to be fooled as most of the activity was by the sun spot! but I was pleased with the outcoom nonetheless.

the attached image is from a 10,000 frame ser file in which I stacked the top 70% to and while that may not be optimal as the sun changes so much in little time ii love the depth and detail I get with such heavy stacks.

the image was processed using Autostakkert, sharpened and deconvolved using Impgg and finally taken into photoshop for some more contrast, false color, sharpening and slight noise reduction.

please feel free to visit my instagram page or astrobin

@mi7sen89 on instagram
Mi7sen on Astrobin

Regards,

Abdulmohsen Alreesh

wrightdobbs
Asternaut
Posts: 8
Joined: Wed Jan 19, 2022 10:42 pm

Re: Submissions: 2022 February

Post by wrightdobbs » Mon Feb 21, 2022 5:57 pm

I've been wanting to capture this composition for a while and had to wait for the right time of the year when the Big Dipper constellation rises between these two trees.

5 tracked (with a star tracker) images stacked at ISO 4000, f/3.5, and 60 seconds and the foreground was a single image at f/3.5, ISO 5000, and 75 seconds. Star glow added manually in post to highlight the constellations. Captured in Wacissa, Florida.

Captured with a Sony a7ii and a Sigma 35mm lens.
https://twitter.com/WrightDobbs
https://www.facebook.com/wrightdobbsphotography
https://instagram.com/wrightdobbs

justintastro
Asternaut
Posts: 2
Joined: Sat Feb 05, 2022 10:26 pm

Re: Submissions: 2022 February

Post by justintastro » Tue Feb 22, 2022 2:09 am

Lion Nebula/Sh2-132
28 Hours integration time from Salt Lake City
Image
@justintastro

messier63
Ensign
Posts: 24
Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2012 3:41 pm

Horse nebula Epsilon 250 f/3.4 ED

Post by messier63 » Tue Feb 22, 2022 12:17 pm

Epsilon 250 ED f/3.4, Canon 6D Astrodon, 1600 iso, only 1h30 (sub of 2min) any filter.
Jérôme ASTREOUD and Philippe TOSI France.
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messier63
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Posts: 24
Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2012 3:41 pm

M78

Post by messier63 » Tue Feb 22, 2022 12:20 pm

Newton T520mm f/4.7 Nikon Z6 defiltered, 1600 iso, 4h24 (sub of 2min) any filter.
Jérôme ASTREOUD and Philippe TOSI France.
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messier63
Ensign
Posts: 24
Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2012 3:41 pm

NGC 1333

Post by messier63 » Tue Feb 22, 2022 12:23 pm

Newton T520mm f/4.7 , Nikon Z6 defiltered, 1600 iso, 2h45 (sub of 2min) any filter.

Jérôme ASTREOUD and Philippe TOSI France.
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messier63
Ensign
Posts: 24
Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2012 3:41 pm

Running Man ready for Olympic games

Post by messier63 » Tue Feb 22, 2022 12:25 pm

Running man ready for Olympic games :D
Newton T520mm f/4.7 Nikon Z6 defiltered, 1600 iso, 4h (sub of 2min) any filter.

Jérôme ASTREOUD and Philippe TOSI France.
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messier63
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Posts: 24
Joined: Thu Mar 29, 2012 3:41 pm

M78 revealed by the Takahashi Epsilon 250 ED f/3.4

Post by messier63 » Tue Feb 22, 2022 1:15 pm

Epsilon 250 ED f/3.4, Canon 6D Astrodon, 1600 iso, only 2h14 (sub of 2min) any filter.
Version red and one less red :P

Jérôme ASTREOUD and Philippe TOSI France.
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