Found Images: 2022 October

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bystander
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Found Images: 2022 October

Post by bystander » Mon Oct 03, 2022 2:31 pm


Have you seen a great image or video somewhere that you think would make a great APOD? Nominate it for APOD! Please post as much information here as you have about the image/video with a link to any source(s) for it you know of here, and the editors will take a look.

When posting the image itself, please do not post anything larger than a thumbnail here; please honor the copyright holder's copyright.

Please keep hotlinked images under 500K.

Thank you!

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Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
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ESO: A Blast from the Past (GRB 210905A)

Post by bystander » Mon Oct 03, 2022 3:48 pm

A Blast from the Past
ESO Picture of the Week | 2022 Oct 03
Do you see that small red spot? That’s an extremely distant explosion in the early universe imaged by the X-Shooter instrument at ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT). This light is from a gamma-ray burst (GRB), one of the most luminous and puzzling phenomena in the universe.

In September 2021, NASA's Neil Gehrels Swift Observatory detected a bright source of gamma rays in this area of the sky. Once the initial bright flash of a GRB has died down, the afterglow shines at longer wavelengths like visible or infrared light. But they fade very quickly, so astronomers must react fast! A team of astronomers led by Andrea Rossi at INAF in Bologna observed the aftermath of the GRB with a number of telescopes around the world, including several ESO instruments on the VLT and the robotic telescopes REM and GROND hosted at ESO’s La Silla Observatory.

Besides taking images with X-Shooter, the team also used this instrument to obtain spectra. This was key to discover that the burst originates from an extremely distant galaxy, when the universe was only 6% of its current age, making this one of the most distant GBRs ever found.

The origins of gamma-ray bursts however remain a bit of a mystery. According to Rossi’s team, this particular GRB put out so much energy that it was probably powered by material falling onto a black hole or (less likely) a magnetar –– a neutron star with a very strong magnetic field. With ESO’s upcoming Extremely Large Telescope (ELT), properties of bursts like these and their progenitors can be studied in greater detail, and their elusive origin can be uncovered.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

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ESA: A Snapshot of Interacting Galaxies (AM 608-333)

Post by bystander » Mon Oct 03, 2022 4:02 pm

A Snapshot of Interacting Galaxies
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2022 Oct 03
The two interacting galaxies making up the pair known as Arp-Madore 608-333 seem to float side by side in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. Though they appear serene and unperturbed, the two are subtly warping one another through a mutual gravitational interaction that is disrupting and distorting both galaxies. This drawn-out galactic interaction was captured by Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS).

The interacting galaxies in Arp-Madore 608-333 were captured as part of an effort to build up an archive of interesting targets for more detailed future study with Hubble, ground-based telescopes, and the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). To build up this archive, astronomers scoured existing astronomical catalogues for a list of targets spread throughout the night sky. By so doing, they hoped to include objects that had already been identified as interesting and that would be easy for Hubble to observe no matter which direction it was pointing.

Deciding how to award Hubble observing time is a drawn-out, competitive and difficult process, and the observations are allocated so as to use every last second of Hubble time available. However, there is a small but persistent fraction of time — around 2–3% — that goes unused as Hubble turns to point at new targets. Snapshot programmes, such as the one which captured Arp-Madore 608-333, exist to fill this gap and take advantage of the moments between longer observations. As well as creating beautiful images such as this, these snapshot programs enable astronomers to gather as much data as possible with Hubble.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2022 October

Post by starsurfer » Mon Oct 03, 2022 10:11 pm

NGC 672 and IC 1727
https://noirlab.edu/public/images/iotw2019a/
Copyright: KPNO/NOIRLab/NSF/AURA
Acknowledgment: PI: M T. Patterson (New Mexico State University)
Processing: Travis Rector (University of Alaska Anchorage), Mahdi Zamani & Davide de Martin

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Re: Found Images: 2022 October

Post by starsurfer » Mon Oct 03, 2022 10:16 pm

NGC 7771 region
https://afesan.es/Deepspace/slides/NGC% ... us%29.html
Copyright: Antonio Sánchez
NGC7771.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 October

Post by starsurfer » Thu Oct 06, 2022 9:45 pm

StDr Object 4
https://www.astrobin.com/eleapk/
Data: Markus Blauensteiner
Processing: Marcel Drechsler
ZQxCukHSPTJC_16536x0_b9muqi8S.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 October

Post by starsurfer » Thu Oct 06, 2022 9:52 pm

Seagull Nebula (IC 2177)
http://www.cielaustral.com/galerie/photo120.htm
Copyright: Ciel Austral
Photo120.jpg
Photo120fb.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 October

Post by starsurfer » Thu Oct 06, 2022 9:54 pm

NGC 300
https://www.hansonastronomy.com/ngc-300-swos
Copyright: Mark Hanson
NGC300.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 October

Post by starsurfer » Thu Oct 06, 2022 9:56 pm

Crystal Ball Nebula (NGC 1514)
https://www.astrobin.com/9ywsec/
Copyright: Boris Chausov
8mnToURptZBY_16536x0_b9muqi8S.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 October

Post by starsurfer » Thu Oct 06, 2022 10:00 pm

M63
http://olegbr.astroclub.kiev.ua/?p=2741
Copyright: Oleg Bryzgalov
M63.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 October

Post by martinkonrat » Sat Oct 08, 2022 12:52 am

Image

The Seven Sisters (Pleiades Star Cluster, M45) in Taurus.

I tried to be truthful to this target. This part of the sky has a wide area of little-to-none real background,
and my goal was to show the cluster with details but also not to kill the dust surrounding it.
The final image showed up as a dreamy-looking framing.

The Pleiades are an example of an open star cluster.
A group of stars that were all born around the same time from a gigantic cloud of gas and dust.
The brightest stars in the formation glow a hot blue and formed within the last 100 million years.
They are extremely luminous and will burn out quickly, with life spans of only a few hundred million years,
much shorter than the billions of years our sun will enjoy.

🗓 September, 24st to October, 2nd. 2022
📍 Giruá, RS, Brazil. Bortle 4.
🔭 ASKAR FRA400 refractor
📷 asi294mm camera
🕶 Antlia L,R,G,B filters
- 201 x 120s Luminance frames (6,7h)
- 35 x 120s Red frames (1,16h)
- 42 x 120s Green frames (1,4h)
- 51 x 120s Blue frames (1,7h)
- total integration time: ~11h
🧑‍💻 pixinsight, photoshop

starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2022 October

Post by starsurfer » Sat Oct 08, 2022 10:21 pm

NGC 2440
https://www.chart32.de/index.php/component/k2/item/109
Copyright: CHART32
Processing: Johannes Schedler

starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2022 October

Post by starsurfer » Sat Oct 08, 2022 10:24 pm

NGC 6781
https://members.pcug.org.au/~stevec/ngc ... 3_RC14.htm
Copyright: Steve Crouch
ngc6781.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2022 October

Post by cosmicwreckingball » Sun Oct 09, 2022 5:13 pm

Lagoon to Eagle by Dennis Sprinkle
Copyright: Dennis Sprinkle

https://www.astrobin.com/kugtmt/

Image

https://cdn.astrobin.com/thumbs/2E-839p ... wMX-gx.jpg

From Dennis' Astrobin Page:

This is a 5 panel mosaic shot from my remote telescope in Marathon, TX.

Software used to capture image:
Sequence Generator Pro
PHD2

Software used to edit:
PixInsight
Photoshop

Total data gathered:
(76) Ha @ 900s – 1x1
(319) Lum @ 45s - 1x1
(79) R @ 130s - 1x1
(80) G @ 150s - 1x1
(79) B @ 205s - 1x1

Camera : QHY600 with 0.72x reducer set to Readout mode 1, Gain set to 0, and Offset to 20
Telescope: Takahashi FSQ-106EDX4
Mount: AP Mach1GTO
Last edited by bystander on Sun Oct 09, 2022 10:14 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Please, no hot links to images > 500 kb. Substituted smaller image.
Matt Harbison
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Cameras, Binoculars, Dobs, Cats, and Refractors. Whatever it takes!

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Ann
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Re: Found Images: 2022 October

Post by Ann » Sun Oct 09, 2022 6:53 pm

cosmicwreckingball wrote: Sun Oct 09, 2022 5:13 pm Lagoon to Eagle by Dennis Sprinkle
Copyright: Dennis Sprinkle

https://www.astrobin.com/kugtmt/
2E-839pa-TbY_2560x0_n1wMX-gx[1].jpg
From Dennis' Astrobin Page:

This is a 5 panel mosaic shot from my remote telescope in Marathon, TX.

Software used to capture image:
Sequence Generator Pro
PHD2

Software used to edit:
PixInsight
Photoshop

Total data gathered:
(76) Ha @ 900s – 1x1
(319) Lum @ 45s - 1x1
(79) R @ 130s - 1x1
(80) G @ 150s - 1x1
(79) B @ 205s - 1x1

Camera : QHY600 with 0.72x reducer set to Readout mode 1, Gain set to 0, and Offset to 20
Telescope: Takahashi FSQ-106EDX4
Mount: AP Mach1GTO
Wow, this is frickin' amazing! :shock: I so hope that this will be an APOD! :D

Unfortunately, you are not allowed to post anything larger than ~400 KB here at Starship Asterisk*. (Personally I believe that 500 KB will be accepted.) But your image is too large, so I'm reproducing it here at a smaller size.

I have to say it again, it is a superb image! :D

Ann
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cosmicwreckingball
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Re: Found Images: 2022 October

Post by cosmicwreckingball » Sun Oct 09, 2022 8:13 pm

Thank you, Ann! Sorry for the trouble. :)
Matt Harbison
President Emeritus, Barnard Astronomical Society of Chattanooga
Cameras, Binoculars, Dobs, Cats, and Refractors. Whatever it takes!

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Re: Found Images: 2022 October

Post by martinkonrat » Sun Oct 09, 2022 10:53 pm

Image

From WR-134 to The Tulip Nebula in Cygnus (SHO)

🗓 September, 23rd to 25th. 2022
📍 Giruá, RS, Brazil. Bortle 4.
🔭 ASKAR FRA400 refractor
📷 asi294mm camera
🕶 Antlia Ha, Oiii and Sii 3nm filters
- 83 x 180s Ha frames
- 69 x 180s Sii frames
- 72 x 180s Oiii frames
- total integration time: ~11h
🧑‍💻 pixinsight, photoshop

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Re: Found Images: 2022 October

Post by maxifalieres » Mon Oct 10, 2022 3:28 am

The NGC 300 in Sculptor Constellation.
Taken on the "Cielos Albertinos" Obeservatory - Alberti, Buenos Aires Province, Argentina.

Image
NGC 300 by Maximiliano Falieres, en Flickr

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ESO: The Icy Moons of Jupiter

Post by bystander » Mon Oct 10, 2022 3:34 pm

The Icy Moons of Jupiter
ESO Picture of the Week | 2022 Oct 10
This Picture of the Week shows two of Jupiter’s moons, the icy Ganymede and Europa, which have been imaged in the infrared using the SPHERE instrument on ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT). Whilst Europa is quite similar in size to our own Moon, Ganymede is the largest moon in the whole Solar System – it’s even bigger than the planet Mercury!

Their orbits around Jupiter are slightly elliptical, so they get closer and further away from the planet as they orbit it. This results in the moons being stretched and squeezed by the gravitational pull from Jupiter at periodical intervals. This creates frictional heat, warming the insides of the moons, which has made them geologically active. Europa in particular is likely to have active plumes and geysers erupting from the oceans of liquid water beneath the thick ice cover that makes up the surface.

Estimates on the abundances of chemical species on the marble-like surfaces of these moons could be made thanks to these new images and also spectra, which have been published in two studies by Oliver King and Leigh N. Fletcher at the University of Leicester in the United Kingdom. They found that the bright regions of Ganymede consist mainly of water in the form of ice with hints of various salts, and that they have formed more recently than the older darker patches, whose composition still remains a mystery to astronomers.

Observing these moons with ground-based telescopes is challenging, because they look as small as a 1 Euro coin seen from 3-5 km away. Earth’s atmosphere would completely blur these images, but SPHERE’s adaptive optics system corrects these distortions, delivering very sharp images with details as small as 150 km.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

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ESA: Terzan 1, Take 2

Post by bystander » Mon Oct 10, 2022 3:47 pm

Terzan 1, Take 2
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2022 Oct 10
potw2241a[1].jpg
Image Credit: ESA/Hubble & NASA, R. Cohen
Terzan 1 is a globular cluster that lies about 22,000 light-years from Earth in the constellation Scorpius. It is one of 11 globular clusters that were discovered by the Turkish-Armenian astronomer Agop Terzan between 1966 and 1971 when he was working in France, based mostly at Lyon Observatory.

Somewhat confusingly, the 11 Terzan globular clusters are numbered from Terzan 1 to Terzan 12. This is due to an error made by Terzan in 1971, when he rediscovered Terzan 5 — a cluster he had already discovered and reported back in 1968 — and named it Terzan 11. He published its discovery alongside those of Terzan 9, 10 and 12. He quickly realised his mistake, and attempted to have Terzan 12 renamed as Terzan 11. Unfortunately, he did not make it clear that Terzan 5 and Terzan 11 were one and the same, although another astronomer, Ivan Robert King, did publish a note to try and clear up the confusion. Nowadays, most papers recognise the original Terzan 5 and Terzan 12, and accept the oddity that there is no Terzan 11. There have, however, been instances of confusion in the scientific literature over the past few decades.

Terzan 1 is not a new target for Hubble — an image of the cluster was released back in 2015, taken by Hubble’s Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). That instrument was replaced by the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) during the 2009 Hubble servicing mission (SM4). WFC3 has both superior resolving power and a wider field of view than WFPC2, and the improvement is obvious in this fantastically detailed image.
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Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2022 October

Post by starsurfer » Mon Oct 10, 2022 10:15 pm

Kronberger 26
https://www.imagingdeepspace.com/kn26.html
Copyright: Peter Goodhew
8JWRX3xS5JVl_2560x0_n1wMX-gx.jpg
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barretosmed
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Re: Found Images: 2022 October

Post by barretosmed » Mon Oct 10, 2022 11:22 pm

OUR HOME...


best details
https://www.astrobin.com/full/a66uhj/0/

EQUIPMENT:
Canon 6D
Canon lens 24-105 f4

LOCATION: Munhoz - MG - BRAZIL
DATE: 07/01/2022
Author: Fernando Oliveira de Menezes

(Organizing author of the book Amateur Astrophotography in Brazil)
https://clubedeautores.com.br/livro/ast ... -no-brasil
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martinkonrat
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Re: Found Images: 2022 October

Post by martinkonrat » Tue Oct 11, 2022 3:43 pm

l52N76hdNsSS_620x0__sPnTECk[1].png
https://astrob.in/guj079/0/

The Witch Watches her Crystal Ball. IC 2118, Rigel and a lot of tiny galaxies. OSC.

Witch Head Nebula – IC 2118, In Eridanus

The Witch Head Nebula (located around 1,000 light years away from Earth) is categorized as a reflection nebula, or one that shines with the aid of a nearby star.
In this case, Rigel shines its bright light on the gas and dust to create the reflection that we see.
The dust reflects more blue light than red, which gives it its eerie purplish-blue hue.

🗓 October, 3rd to 5th. 2022
📍 Giruá, RS, Brazil. Bortle 4.
🔭 ASKAR FMA230 refractor
📷 asi2600mC camera
🕶 Antlia 5nm duo narrowband filter (alp-t), IDAS LPS-P3 broadband LP filter
- 65 x 300s Duo Narrowband
- 183 x 120s Idas LPS-P3
- total integration time: ~11,5h
🧑‍💻 pixinsight, photoshop
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Last edited by bystander on Tue Oct 11, 2022 4:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2022 October

Post by starsurfer » Tue Oct 11, 2022 10:33 pm

Sh2-188
https://www.spaceimages.de/astrofotos/nebel/sh2-188
Copyright: Jens Zippel
sh2188.jpg
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starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2022 October

Post by starsurfer » Tue Oct 11, 2022 10:35 pm

CTB 1
https://www.flickr.com/photos/130138181 ... 871568444/
Copyright: Yves Van den Broek
44871568444_743ae1cc6f.jpg
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