Found Images: 2023 January

See new, spectacular, or mysterious sky images.
User avatar
bystander
Apathetic Retiree
Posts: 21265
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:06 pm
Location: Oklahoma

Found Images: 2023 January

Post by bystander » Sun Jan 01, 2023 6:33 am


Have you seen a great image or video somewhere that you think would make a great APOD? Nominate it for APOD! Please post as much information here as you have about the image/video with a link to any source(s) for it you know of here, and the editors will take a look.

When posting the image itself, please do not post anything larger than a thumbnail here; please honor the copyright holder's copyright.

Please keep hotlinked images under 500K.

Thank you!

<< Previously
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2023 January

Post by starsurfer » Sun Jan 01, 2023 10:56 pm

Sandqvist 169
http://www.atacama-photographic-observa ... php?id=110
Copyright: Thierry Demange, Richard Galli and Thomas Petit
Sandqvist169.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
bystander
Apathetic Retiree
Posts: 21265
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:06 pm
Location: Oklahoma

ESO: The Technology Behind the Astronomy (VLT)

Post by bystander » Mon Jan 02, 2023 7:01 pm

The Technology Behind the Astronomy
ESO Picture of the Week | 2023 Jan 02
The technical and engineering achievement behind the astronomical images and discoveries produced by scientists using ESO facilities is exceptionally marvelous. Here we see the fourth Unit Telescope (Yepun) of ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile, which hosts several advanced instruments, such as MUSE, HAWK-I and ERIS

These instruments, engineered to study the mysteries of the Universe, such as planets, stellar nurseries, and supermassive black holes, would never be able to do so without the Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF). One of the components of the AOF is the 4 Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF). The lasers are emitted from the four black tubes seen in this image around the telescope’s 8.2-m mirror. Each laser beam is 30 centimeters wide and carries 22 watts of power! As the lasers reach about 90 kilometers into Earth’s atmosphere, they excite sodium atoms, making them glow, just like a star.

Special sensors in each instrument measure the twinkling of these artificial stars in real time. Instructions are sent to the telescope’s deformable secondary mirror, which reshapes at millisecond speeds. This counteracts atmospheric turbulence, delivering crystal clear images.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

User avatar
bystander
Apathetic Retiree
Posts: 21265
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:06 pm
Location: Oklahoma

ESA: Stargazing in NGC 6355

Post by bystander » Mon Jan 02, 2023 7:12 pm

Stargazing in NGC 6355
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2023 Jan 02
The scattered stars of the globular cluster NGC 6355 are strewn across this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. This globular cluster lies less than 50,000 light-years from Earth in the Ophiuchus constellation. NGC 6355 is a galactic globular cluster that resides in our Milky Way galaxy's inner regions.

Globular clusters are stable, tightly bound clusters of tens of thousands to millions of stars, and can be found in all types of galaxy. Their dense populations of stars and mutual gravitational attraction give these clusters a roughly spherical shape, with a bright concentration of stars surrounded by an increasingly sparse sprinkling of stars. The dense, bright core of NGC 6355 was picked out in crystal-clear detail by Hubble in this image, and is the crowded area of stars towards the centre of this image. 

With its vantage point above the distortions of the atmosphere, Hubble has revolutionised the study of globular clusters. It is almost impossible to distinguish the stars in globular clusters from one another with ground-based telescopes, but astronomers have been able to use Hubble to study the constituent stars of globular clusters in detail. This Hubble image of NGC 6355 contains data from both the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3).
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2023 January

Post by starsurfer » Tue Jan 03, 2023 11:50 pm

Helix Nebula (NGC 7293)
http://www.cielaustral.com/galerie/photo143.htm
Copyright: Ciel Austral
photo143.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2023 January

Post by starsurfer » Tue Jan 03, 2023 11:52 pm

Abell 7
https://www.hansonastronomy.com/abell-7
Copyright: Mark Hanson
Abell-7.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
bystander
Apathetic Retiree
Posts: 21265
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:06 pm
Location: Oklahoma

NOIRLab: Triple Stellar Treat (HP Tau)

Post by bystander » Wed Jan 04, 2023 7:43 pm

Triple Stellar Treat
NOIRLab Image of the Week | KPNO | 2023 Jan 04
Image Credit ~ Data: KPNO/NOIRLab/NSF/AURA/P. Massey
Processing: T.A. Rector (University of Alaska Anchorage/NSF’s NOIRLab),
M. Zamani (NSF’s NOIRLab) & D. de Martin (NSF’s NOIRLab)

This observation captures the variable star HP Tau, which lies more than 550 light-years from Earth in the constellation Taurus. This image was created using data from the Nicholas U. Mayall 4-meter Telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO), a Program of NSF’s NOIRLab. HP Tau is a T Tauri star, a young and chaotic type of star that is settling into a more sedate phase of stellar life known as the main sequence. The length of time that a star spends on the main sequence will depend on its mass. Our Sun, for example, is about halfway through its roughly 10-billion-year main-sequence lifetime.

HP Tau is part of a triple star system — the three separate stars are visible at the center of this image — surrounded by a large arcing reflection nebula. These nebulae, as the name suggests, reflect the light from nearby stars rather than glowing like emission nebulae elsewhere in the Universe.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2023 January

Post by starsurfer » Wed Jan 04, 2023 11:08 pm

HDW 3
https://www.astrobin.com/ox98cs/
Copyright: Luca Marinelli
lUkfBCAz4pFI_16536x0_EwouY30K.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2023 January

Post by starsurfer » Wed Jan 04, 2023 11:13 pm

Sh2-240
https://www.astrobin.com/286622/0/
Copyright: Rick Stevenson
rylmDbwqoTs0_2560x0_vdqVlLaL.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2023 January

Post by starsurfer » Wed Jan 04, 2023 11:16 pm

Rho Ophiuchi region
https://www.flickr.com/photos/130830021 ... 915679025/
Copyright: Troy Casswell
33915679025_358ae29817.jpg
Also includes Mars and Saturn.
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2023 January

Post by starsurfer » Sat Jan 07, 2023 11:49 pm

NGC 4651
https://esahubble.org/images/potw2013a/
Copyright: ESA/Hubble & NASA, D. Leonard

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2023 January

Post by starsurfer » Sat Jan 07, 2023 11:52 pm

NGC 1977
http://www.astro-austral.cl/imagenes/ne ... 7/info.htm
Copyright: José Joaquin Pérez
ngc1977.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

barretosmed
Science Officer
Posts: 387
Joined: Thu Oct 12, 2017 6:04 pm

Re: Found Images: 2023 January

Post by barretosmed » Sun Jan 08, 2023 2:59 pm

FORNAX GALAXIES A AND B (NGC 1316 E NGC 1317)


BEST DETAILS
https://www.astrobin.com/full/tsdupy/0/

EQUIPMENT:
Espirit 150mm triplet
Zwo asi 6200mc
Mount CEM120
257X300"
Software: Sequence Genneration Pro, Adobe Lightroom Classic, Adobe Photoshop and Pleiades Astrophoto PixInsight

LOCATION: Munhoz - MG - Brazil

DATES: 10/05/2022 to 11/31/2022

Author: Fernando Oliveira de Menezes
Email: barretosmed@hotmail.com
(Organizing author of the book Amateur Astrophotography in Brazil)
https://clubedeautores.com.br/livro/ast ... -no-brasil

You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
bystander
Apathetic Retiree
Posts: 21265
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:06 pm
Location: Oklahoma

ESA: Calling on a Galactic Neighbour (LEDA 48062)

Post by bystander » Mon Jan 09, 2023 6:54 pm

Calling on a Galactic Neighbour
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2023 Jan 09
This image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope features the galaxy LEDA 48062 in the constellation Perseus. LEDA 48062 is the faint, sparse, amorphous galaxy on the right side of this image, and it is accompanied by a more sharply defined neighbour on the left, the large, disc-like lenticular galaxy UGC 8603. A smattering of more distant galaxies also litter the background, and a handful of foreground stars are also visible throughout the image.

Have you ever wondered why the stars in Hubble images are surrounded by four sharp points? These are called diffraction spikes, and are created when starlight diffracts — or spreads around — the support structures inside reflecting telescopes like Hubble. The four spikes are due to the four thin vanes supporting Hubble’s secondary mirror and are only noticeable for bright objects like stars where a lot of light is concentrated on one spot. Darker, more spread-out objects like the galaxies LEDA 48062 and UGC 8603 do not possess visible diffraction spikes. 

Hubble recently spent some time with our galactic neighbours. LEDA 48062 is only around 30 million light-years from the Milky Way, and was therefore included in the observing campaign Every Known Nearby Galaxy. The aim of this campaign was to observe precisely that: every known galaxy within 10 megaparsecs (around 33 million light-years) of the Milky Way. By getting to know our galactic neighbours, astronomers can determine what types of stars reside in various galaxies and also map out the local structure of the Universe.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2023 January

Post by starsurfer » Tue Jan 10, 2023 11:07 pm

M82
https://www.astrobin.com/qjmcrq/D/
Copyright: Christoph Lichtblau
9xsU6mWWTuyn_16536x0_41i1_Lk2.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2023 January

Post by starsurfer » Tue Jan 10, 2023 11:08 pm

M83
https://www.astrobin.com/3e9o8v/B/
Copyright: Jarrett Trezzo
4dB7sSEb_-W9_16536x16536_xTjz_rdB.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2023 January

Post by starsurfer » Tue Jan 10, 2023 11:10 pm

M94
https://www.astrobin.com/vz54ku/0/
Copyright: Mikko Viljamaa
1MtZthr4MiOE_16536x16536_kWXURFLk.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2023 January

Post by starsurfer » Tue Jan 10, 2023 11:12 pm

M101
https://www.astrobin.com/o0dp6w/
Copyright: Mike Matthews
LPGGQqyoUH1F_16536x16536_0dzfm_R_.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2023 January

Post by starsurfer » Tue Jan 10, 2023 11:14 pm

NGC 4725 and NGC 4712
https://www.astrobin.com/8pto9t/B/
Copyright: Andrei Ioda
HOtGGcNKHD7U_16536x16536_q7eX4JOW.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2023 January

Post by starsurfer » Sat Jan 14, 2023 11:26 pm

NGC 6902
https://www.eso.org/public/images/potw1908a/
Copyright: ESO/SPECULOOS Team/E. Jehin

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 4987
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: Found Images: 2023 January

Post by starsurfer » Sat Jan 14, 2023 11:31 pm

NGC 5371 and Hickson 68
http://www.capella-observatory.com/Imag ... kson68.htm
Copyright: Josef Pöpsel, Frank Sackenheim and Stefan Binnewies
NGC5371.jpg
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.

User avatar
bystander
Apathetic Retiree
Posts: 21265
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:06 pm
Location: Oklahoma

ESO: Closest Pair of Supermassive Black Holes as Seen by MUSE

Post by bystander » Mon Jan 16, 2023 11:17 am

Closest Pair of Supermassive Black Holes as Seen by MUSE
ESO Picture of the Week | 2023 Jan 10
In this Picture of the Week we peer closer into the galaxy UGC 4211, where astronomers have discovered two supermassive black holes on the verge of merging, separated by just 750 lightyears — the closest to have been found to date using multiple wavelengths and less than half of the previous record. They used ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT), the Atacama Large Millimeter / submillimeter Array (ALMA), of which ESO is a partner, and other telescopes to detect the bright light produced as the black holes engulf material in their vicinity.

Both of the images shown here were made using data from the MUSE instrument on ESO’s VLT in Chile. The left image shows a classical view of this galaxy, with dust lanes obscuring starlight. The image on the right shows emission from oxygen, nitrogen and hydrogen in blue, green and red respectively. Red indicates areas of star formation, and the bright white central region indicates the presence of two supermassive black holes swallowing material from their surroundings. 

Combining data from the VLT, ALMA and other telescopes, a team led by Michael Koss at Eureka Scientific in the US could identify these two black holes and study them in detail. These black holes likely found each other when their host galaxies collided and merged. Observing this system will help improve our understanding of how galaxies and their supermassive black holes grow as they merge.

UGC 4211: A Confirmed Dual Active Galactic Nucleus
in the Local Universe at 230 pc Nuclear Separation
~ Michael J. Koss et al
viewtopic.php?t=42878
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

User avatar
bystander
Apathetic Retiree
Posts: 21265
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:06 pm
Location: Oklahoma

NOIRLab: An Expansive Universe

Post by bystander » Mon Jan 16, 2023 11:34 am

An Expansive Universe
NOIRLab Image of the Week | 2023 Jan 11
The extent of our visual field is limited, and can process little information compared to its actual environment. But what would the night sky look like with a much wider field of view, like with a camera?

In this panorama, the Milky Way sets the night ablaze in a bright glowing pillar, dividing the sky in two. On the right, the Gemini South telescope — one half of the International Gemini Observatory, operated by NSF’s NOIRLab — projects its laser guide star into the atmosphere. In the sky above the telescope, from left to right, lie the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds and the star Canopus. On the other end of the image is the SOAR Telescope — part of Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO), a Program of NOIRLab — with three stars above it forming the semblance of a triangle. The top left vertex is Denebola, the bottom Arcturus, and the top right Spica. There are many more objects in the night sky than these, though it is quite impressive to capture this many with just a panorama. Imagine how much more stunning detail large telescopes like Gemini South and SOAR can discover.

This photo was taken as part of the recent NOIRLab 2022 Photo Expedition to all the NOIRLab sites. A full 360-degree panorama of this image can be viewed here.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

User avatar
bystander
Apathetic Retiree
Posts: 21265
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:06 pm
Location: Oklahoma

ESO: A Danish View of the Milky Way

Post by bystander » Mon Jan 16, 2023 11:39 am

A Danish View of the Milky Way
ESO Picture of the Week | 2023 Jan 16
Since 1979, the 1.54-metre Danish telescope at ESO’s La Silla observatory has been unveiling intricate details about our home galaxy. Stretching over the telescope in this image is the Milky Way and its galactic heart, lighting up the night sky in the Chilean desert. 

The Danish 1.54-m was used in a 15-year long survey published in 2004 to study 14,000 stars in our galaxy, providing the first clues to the turbulent and violent history of the Milky Way. The survey measured the motions of these stars and their distances, as well as their ages and chemical composition. This allowed the creation of a historical map of the Milky Way which revealed a far more complex history of the galaxy than previously expected.

The Milky way cruises the Chilean night sky and looks peaceful in this image, but the survey found traces of a much more dynamic activity in the past. In particular, collisions with other smaller galaxies brought gigantic gas clouds that made the Milky Way come alive with star-formation and supernova explosions, making it the stunning place that we call home. 
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor

User avatar
bystander
Apathetic Retiree
Posts: 21265
Joined: Mon Aug 28, 2006 2:06 pm
Location: Oklahoma

ESA: Visitor to a Galaxy (UGC 7983)

Post by bystander » Mon Jan 16, 2023 11:55 am

Visitor to a Galaxy
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2023 Jan 16
A host of astronomical objects throng this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. Background galaxies ranging from stately spirals to fuzzy ellipticals are strewn across the image, and bright foreground stars much closer to home are also present, surrounded by diffraction spikes. In the centre of the image, the vague shape of the small galaxy UGC 7983 appears as a hazy cloud of light. UGC 7983 is around 30 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Virgo, and is a dwarf irregular galaxy — a type thought to be similar to the very earliest galaxies in the Universe.

This image also conceals an astronomical interloper. A minor asteroid, only a handful of kilometres across, can be seen streaking across the upper left-hand side of this image. The trail of the asteroid is visible as four streaks of light separated by small gaps. These streaks of light represent the four separate exposures that were combined to create this image, the small gaps between each observation being necessary to change the filters inside Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). 

Capturing an asteroid was a fortunate side effect of a larger effort to observe every known galaxy close to the Milky Way. When this project was first proposed, roughly 75% of all the Milky Way’s near galactic neighbours had been imaged by Hubble. A group of astronomers proposed using the gaps between longer Hubble observations to capture images of the remaining 25%. The project was an elegantly efficient way to fill out some gaps not only in Hubble's observing schedule, but also in our knowledge of nearby galaxies.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor