Submissions: 2023 February

See new, spectacular, or mysterious sky images.
Rafeee
Ensign
Posts: 32
Joined: Fri Feb 24, 2012 8:52 pm
Location: Hungary, Zselic Starry Sky Park

Re: Submissions: 2023 February

Post by Rafeee » Mon Feb 27, 2023 3:38 pm

"Maintenance"
2023_02_09_pan_01_fulldome_2048px.jpg
Copyright: Rafael Schmall
https://www.astrobin.com/users/Rafeee/

The sights of the winter sky were all within arm's reach.

Huge Zodiacal light, winter Milky Way, winter constellations, slowly resting autumn constalletions. Of course, the comet is also there as a small spot, as well as some atmospheric light.

Recently, the situation is a bit worse, since our Sun is active, which makes it more exciting in the upper atmosphere... in such a place, you can practically see the atmospheric light with the naked eye.

Image Details:
Equipment: Canon EOS6D, Rokinon 24mm f/1.4, Manfrotto XPROB
Exif data: 80x10sec, ISO10000, f2, 24mm
Processing: Lightroom, Photoshop, PTGUI

Location: Hungary, Zselic Starry Sky Park, Zselic Park of Stars
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Carballada
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Posts: 20
Joined: Sat Mar 16, 2019 10:19 am

Re: Submissions: 2023 February

Post by Carballada » Mon Feb 27, 2023 4:30 pm

Image

CTB-1 Supernova remnant in Cassiopeia (Abell 85) by Jose Carballada, on Flickr

This picture is the result of an integration of 6 hours on RGB and another 54 hours in narrow band, using a focal length of 530mm and aperture f3.3
It was a long project in terms of acquisition period, five months of capturing frames from September 2022 to January 2023, only on nights with no moon.
The elaboration was a little bit more complex as usual due the high number of stars on the frame.
Image
RGB master

I really like how this Epsilon shows all fine details and structures on the nebulae, and how PK116+00.1 is properly defined.

CTB 1 is a supernova remnant located in the Milky Way galaxy.
It is thought to be the remnants of a massive star that underwent a supernova explosion, expelling its outer layers into the interstellar medium and leaving behind a compact object such as a neutron star or a black hole.Supernova remnants are important because they help us to understand the evolution of stars and the processes involved in supernovae.
They also release large amounts of matter and energy into the interstellar medium, which can have a significant impact on their surroundings.
CTB 1 was discovered in the late 1970s and has been the subject of numerous studies since then. These studies have helped to improve our understanding of the structure, dynamics, and evolution of supernova remnants, as well as the properties of the supernova explosions themselves.
It is believed that CTB 1 is relatively young, with an estimated age of only a few thousand years. This makes it an important object for studying the early stages of the evolution of supernova remnants, and for understanding the processes involved in their formation and evolution.

All technical details of the capture on the photo post.

Alberto Vacca
Asternaut
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon Feb 27, 2023 6:38 pm

Re: Submissions: 2023 February

Post by Alberto Vacca » Mon Feb 27, 2023 7:57 pm

High resolution Solar mosaic
Copyright: Alberto Vacca
https://www.flickr.com/photos/197853132 ... ed-public/ (higher resolution version) Description:
My first solar mosaic, captured last week on February 14. A lot of sunspots are visible: 3213, 3214, 3216, 3217, 3218, 3219, 3220, 3221, 3224, 3225, 3226, 3227, 3228. There were some difficulties in making the mosaic because I had to join 20 panels with slightly different seeing conditions and with different field rotation due to the use of an alt-az mount. Some of the panels were spotless so I had to align them manually using solar granulation, but I also had to be quick during capture because solar granulation changes its pattern about every 5 minutes. I rotated each frame by a different angle to compensate field rotation.

Equipment:
- Celestron Nexstar 127slt maksutov telescope on its alt-az mount
- Astrosolar filter
- Zwo ADC
- Zwo Asi 120mc-s color camera

Processing:
- PIPP (debayer and conversion to monochrome using G and B channels, with a better quality than R)
- Avistack (stacking)
- Registax (sharpening)
- Adobe Photoshop (to join panels, add color and finishing touches)

photonsfromspace
Asternaut
Posts: 2
Joined: Thu Feb 09, 2023 7:37 pm

Re: Submissions: 2023 February

Post by photonsfromspace » Tue Feb 28, 2023 7:04 pm

M101 The Pinwheel Galaxy. Galaxy season is still in full swing here. This is my first time imaging M101. As well as my first time incorporating both Ha data into RGB and creating a synthetic Luminance image from the RGB (I don't have room for my Lum filter unless I swap it out with my Oiii or Sii...) Acquisition wise I still need to do some work on getting better collimation on my EdgeHD 8 but it's not terrible. The seeing was marginally ok during this session hence the slightly bloated stars, BlurX helped a lot.
M101 Pinwheel Galaxy-.jpg
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barretosmed
Science Officer
Posts: 393
Joined: Thu Oct 12, 2017 6:04 pm

Re: Submissions: 2023 February

Post by barretosmed » Thu Mar 02, 2023 1:04 am

MOON IN COLOR (MINERAL MOON)


MORE DETAILS
https://www.astrobin.com/full/w2xo5x/0/

The Moon is usually seen in subtle shades of gray or yellow
The different colors are recognized to correspond to real differences in the chemical composition of the lunar surface.
The blue tones reveal areas rich in ilmenite, which contains iron, titanium and oxygen, mainly titanium, while the orange and purple colors show regions relatively poor in titanium and iron. The white / gray tones refer to areas of greater exposure to sunlight.

EQUIPMENTS:
ZWO ASI 6200MC COLED
Esprit 150mm
Baader Moon Filter
Date: 03/01/2023
Time: 21:30
Location: Munhoz - MG - Brazil

PROCESSING AND CAPTURE:
Software: Adobe Photoshop, SharpCap, AutoStakkert AutoStackert and Registax 6.

Copyright: Fernando Oliveira de Menezes
Email: Barretosmed@hotmail.com
(Organizing author of the book Amateur Astrophotography in Brazil)
https://clubedeautores.com.br/livro/ast ... -no-brasil
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Efrain Morales
Science Officer
Posts: 481
Joined: Fri Oct 22, 2010 8:15 pm
AKA: Jaicoa
Location: Aguadilla, Puerto Rico

Jupiter, Venus Conjunction - March 1st

Post by Efrain Morales » Thu Mar 02, 2023 3:22 am

The Planets Jupiter and Venus Conjunction on March 1st. A very short session due to incoming clouds. ( ED80 APO, LX200ACF 305mm OTA, CGE mount, ASI183mm Pro, ASI290mm Cmos, PowerMate 2.5x barlows, Astronomik LRGB filter set.)
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Galactic-Hunter
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Posts: 14
Joined: Wed Jul 08, 2020 3:13 pm

Re: 80 hours on the Christmas Tree and Cone Nebula

Post by Galactic-Hunter » Thu Mar 09, 2023 4:40 pm

Hey Ann, sorry for the late response. I think you are referring to LBN 902?
If not, you can find the annotated image here, which tells you the exact location and the name of the stars/objects around: https://www.astrobin.com/41pqbs/B/

Clear Skies,

Antoine

Ann wrote: Thu Feb 23, 2023 10:05 am
Galactic-Hunter wrote: Wed Feb 22, 2023 5:54 pm My longest integration yet, beating the 61 hours I did on the Seagull and Thor Nebulae.

I captured this target throughout November, December, and January. It is NGC 2264, also known as the Christmas Tree cluster and Cone Nebula.

I spent close to 82 hours capturing this object, using SHO filters for the gas and RGB filters for the stars.

The details are very crisp, the noise is basically non-existent, and the colors came out vibrant! This was a fun project, and I was very surprised to see this range of colors pop up so easily even after a simple channel combination.

More info here: https://www.galactic-hunter.com/post/ngc2264

Credit:
Antoine Grelin
https://www.galactic-hunter.com/


ImageNGC 2264 - Xmas Tree Narrowband
Great image, Antoine! :D

Tell me something, though. In the lower left part of your image, at about 7 o'clock, there is a rather small but bright blue area peeking out from under a thick dust arc. It looks to me as if this might be a site of ongoing star formation, but I'm not familiar with it. Can you tell me what it is? Better yet, can you tell me where it is, so I can check up its coordinates and use my software to see if I can detect anything there?

Ann

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Ann
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Re: 80 hours on the Christmas Tree and Cone Nebula

Post by Ann » Thu Mar 09, 2023 6:48 pm

Galactic-Hunter wrote: Thu Mar 09, 2023 4:40 pm Hey Ann, sorry for the late response. I think you are referring to LBN 902?
If not, you can find the annotated image here, which tells you the exact location and the name of the stars/objects around: https://www.astrobin.com/41pqbs/B/

Clear Skies,

Antoine

Ann wrote: Thu Feb 23, 2023 10:05 am
Galactic-Hunter wrote: Wed Feb 22, 2023 5:54 pm My longest integration yet, beating the 61 hours I did on the Seagull and Thor Nebulae.

I captured this target throughout November, December, and January. It is NGC 2264, also known as the Christmas Tree cluster and Cone Nebula.

I spent close to 82 hours capturing this object, using SHO filters for the gas and RGB filters for the stars.

The details are very crisp, the noise is basically non-existent, and the colors came out vibrant! This was a fun project, and I was very surprised to see this range of colors pop up so easily even after a simple channel combination.

More info here: https://www.galactic-hunter.com/post/ngc2264

Credit:
Antoine Grelin
https://www.galactic-hunter.com/


ImageNGC 2264 - Xmas Tree Narrowband
Great image, Antoine! :D

Tell me something, though. In the lower left part of your image, at about 7 o'clock, there is a rather small but bright blue area peeking out from under a thick dust arc. It looks to me as if this might be a site of ongoing star formation, but I'm not familiar with it. Can you tell me what it is? Better yet, can you tell me where it is, so I can check up its coordinates and use my software to see if I can detect anything there?

Ann
Thanks! I found the star responsible for lighting up LBN 902. The star is TYC 737-1170-1, it is spectral class O7V, and the distance to it is 11,000 light-years. That's quite a lot!

Ann
Color Commentator