Submissions: 2023 May

See new, spectacular, or mysterious sky images.
isultan
Asternaut
Posts: 7
Joined: Mon Mar 13, 2023 7:01 pm

Re: Submissions: 2023 May

Post by isultan » Tue May 09, 2023 5:12 am

Image

Flower Moon on a cloudy night

The May full moon on a cloudy night. This picture is a composite of a stacked image edited to bring out the colors and details of the "mineral moon," and a longer exposure showing the moonlit clouds.

Equipment: SVBONY SV503 80ED refractor, Canon Rebel T5i, Star Adventurer GTi, ASIAIR Pro

Location: Des Plaines, Illinois
Date: May 4, 2023
Copyright Imran Sultan

WolfHeart
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Posts: 34
Joined: Wed May 11, 2022 3:58 pm

Re: Submissions: 2023 May

Post by WolfHeart » Tue May 09, 2023 6:34 am

Rho Ophiuchi

ImageRho Ophiuchi by Ahmed Waddah, on Flickr

Redcat 51
AM5
Nikon Z6II Stock
Filter: Antlia Triband RGB Ultra Filter
Integration:
53x300" - 4h 25′

April 20, 2023
Valley of Whales National Park, Al Fayoum Desert, Egypt

https://www.astrobin.com/co8t3d/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/waddah.photography
Astrobin: https://www.astrobin.com/users/WolfHeart/
IG: https://www.instagram.com/waddahphotography/

salvatorecerruto
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Posts: 16
Joined: Thu Aug 22, 2019 2:28 pm

Re: Submissions: 2023 May

Post by salvatorecerruto » Tue May 09, 2023 10:40 am

Flower full moon over the ancient furnace
Flower full moon during partial penumbral eclipse. The moon is rising over the old furnace in Sampieri, a valuable example of industrial archaeology in Sicily, very popular among the locals and also popular to the tourists after being a common scenery in the TV fiction 'Il commissario Montalbano'.

Technical details: Nikon D800 + Tamron 100-400 @300mm, f/10, 1/10s, ISO-1000
Date: 2023-05-05

ImageFull Moon of May by Salvatore Cerruto, su Flickr

Efrain Morales
Science Officer
Posts: 483
Joined: Fri Oct 22, 2010 8:15 pm
AKA: Jaicoa
Location: Aguadilla, Puerto Rico

Venus - May 6th

Post by Efrain Morales » Tue May 09, 2023 1:38 pm

Venus on May 6th, Ultraviolet, RGB filters.
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Galactic-Hunter
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Posts: 17
Joined: Wed Jul 08, 2020 3:13 pm

IC 2944 - The Running Chicken Nebula

Post by Galactic-Hunter » Tue May 09, 2023 7:54 pm

Close up on the Running Chicken Nebula, showing nice colorful gasses with several Bok globules.

Credit:
Antoine Grelin, https://www.galactic-hunter.com/
Data acquired from Telescope Live, processed by me.

ImageIC 2944 - Running Chicken Nebula

astronomonogdl
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Posts: 11
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AKA: Astronomono
Location: Mexico

Re: Submissions: 2023 May

Post by astronomonogdl » Thu May 11, 2023 4:44 am

Image
Nebulosa del delfin_lowres_cut 2023 by astronomono delgadillo, en Flickr
https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/528 ... a64c_k.jpg

Nebulosa Cabeza de Delfín. SH2-308
37x300s Optolong L enhance
Sharpstar 15028HNT
ZWO ASI2600MCpro -10°
mount : cgem zwo asi air - zwo efw . zwo eaf
guidescope 80f5 zwo asi 462 APP- AP
Jalisco México
Emmanuel Astronomono
Last edited by bystander on Thu May 11, 2023 5:20 am, edited 2 times in total.
Reason: Please, no hot links to images > 500 kb. Substituted smaller image.

Chris Jensen

Re: Submissions: 2023 May

Post by Chris Jensen » Thu May 11, 2023 6:20 am

ImageIC2872 by Chris Jensen, on Flickr

ArtOfPix
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Posts: 13
Joined: Mon Oct 18, 2021 5:43 am

Re: Submissions: 2023 May

Post by ArtOfPix » Thu May 11, 2023 12:00 pm

THE BODE'S & THE CIGAR GALAXY
- Messier 81 & Messier 82
- Deep Sky 1508mm LRGB
- Constellation Ursar Major

Image

Messier 81 and Messier 82 are two neighboring galaxies in the Ursa Major constellation, located about 12 million light-years from Earth.

Messier 81, also known as Bode's Galaxy or NGC 3031, is a spiral galaxy about 90,000 light-years across and about 12,000 light-years distant from us. One of the brightest galaxies in the night sky, it contains a supermassive black hole with a mass of about 70 million suns at its center. Messier 81 is also known for its numerous supernova explosions that have occurred over the past few centuries. M81 is also known for its numerous HII regions, where young, hot stars produce ionized gas that exhibits striking red colors.

Also known as the Cigar Galaxy or NGC 3034, Messier 82 is an irregular galaxy about 40,000 light-years across and only 10,000 light-years distant from our solar system. It is a so-called starburst galaxy, which means that it has an increased rate of star formation caused by intense interstellar turbulence. This results in an unusual shape for the galaxy, which is elongated and cigar-shaped. M82 also has strong galactic winds triggered by the intense star formation. At its center is a supermassive black hole about 37 million times the mass of our sun.

Telescope: Dream Aerospace Systems 16" f/3.75 Astrograph Reflector, 1508mm
Camera: FLI Proline 16803, Chroma filter set
Lights: 27xred/30xgreen/32xblue each 600s / 10xred/10xgreen/10xblue each 300s / bin 1x1
Location: Beryl, Utah USA (Utah Desert Remote Observatories)
Acquired imageset, taken by Insight Telescope, Imageedit - Thomas ArtOfPix Großschmidt

Image editing:
Mainly Pixinsight, Photoshop, Lightroom, GraXpert, BTX Blur Terminator, Noise Terminator, Star X Terminator

#ursamajor #Messier81 #Messier82 #bodesgalaxy #cigargalaxy #universe #artofpixastro #astrophotography #insightobservatory

astrodoc71

Re: Submissions: 2023 May

Post by astrodoc71 » Thu May 11, 2023 7:07 pm

ImageNGC 3521 by Dave & telescope, on Flickr

Capture info:
Location: SkyPi Remote Observatory, Pie Town, NM US
Time: Spring 2023
Moderately long acquisition time of about 36 hours LRGB in order to capture at least some of the known gaseous shells surrounding the galaxy
400mm reflector and CCD sensor

Thanks for looking!
Dave Doctor
daveandtelescope.wordpress.com

rkas12
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Posts: 27
Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2023 8:04 pm

Re: Submissions: 2023 May

Post by rkas12 » Fri May 12, 2023 12:07 pm

Today, we are issuing the ShaRA Team’s last “combined force” project: A close-up on the Cometary Globule 4 (CG4).

Known as an active star-forming region in the Puppis constellation, CG4 is about 1,300 light-years from our Solar System. Defined as a “cometary globule” due to its resemblance to a comet, the “head” of the galactic worm has dimensions of about 1.5 light years, while the offshoot that follows the head and which is directed in the opposite direction with respect to the rest of the famous Vela supernova (which is at the center of the huge GUM nebula), has a length of about 8 light years.

The rending of our image is resulting from a cocktail of filters which together gives these intriguing colors palette. In a nutshell, broadband filters were used (RGB, to get the “true colors”) in combination with a narrowband filter (H-alpha, which gives this “reddish” aspect within the very complex).

CG4 was photographed in narrow field with a 1 meter telescope located in Chile.

ShaRA Team !

Acquisition details:
Copyright: ShaRA team
Scope: RC 1000, F/6,8
Filters: LRGB-Ha
Location: Rio Hurtado, El Sauce Observatory (Chilescope)

Link to the full article: https://astrotrex.wordpress.com/2023/05 ... r-graboid/


barretosmed
Science Officer
Posts: 410
Joined: Thu Oct 12, 2017 6:04 pm

Re: Submissions: 2023 May

Post by barretosmed » Fri May 12, 2023 8:43 pm

IC 2118 – Witch Head Nebula

Best Details
https://www.astrobin.com/full/gcpejf/B/

EQUIPMENT:
ZWO ASI 6200MC COLED
Esprit 150mm
Painel:
194 x 300"
139x 300"
139x300"
193x300"
DATE: From 09/05/2022 to 03/02/2023

Location: Munhoz - MG - Brazil
PROCESSING AND CAPTURE:
Adobe Lightroom Classic · Adobe Photoshop · Pleiades Astrophoto PixInsight

Author: Fernando Oliveira de Menezes
Email: Barretosmed@hotmail.com
(Organizing author of the book Astrofotografia Amadora no Brasil)
[https://clubedeautores.com.br/livro/ast ... -no-brasil]
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Efrain Morales
Science Officer
Posts: 483
Joined: Fri Oct 22, 2010 8:15 pm
AKA: Jaicoa
Location: Aguadilla, Puerto Rico

Venus - May 11th

Post by Efrain Morales » Sat May 13, 2023 3:07 pm

Venus on May 11th.
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aromar

Re: Submissions: 2023 May

Post by aromar » Sat May 13, 2023 7:04 pm


Naztronomy
Asternaut
Posts: 4
Joined: Wed Feb 09, 2022 3:31 pm

Re: Submissions: 2023 May

Post by Naztronomy » Sat May 13, 2023 8:21 pm

M45 - The Pleiades
https://www.Naztronomy.com
Copyright: Nazmus Nasir
M45_xs.jpg
Higher resolution image here: https://www.naztronomy.com/images/portf ... 102922.jpg (even higher can be provided)

M45 is one of the brightest and most recognizable deep space object in the night sky. Taken early in the season from Westford, MA near the MIT Haystack Observatory. Using my amateur gear on Oct 29, 2022, I collected light from the Pleiades for almost two and a half hours and processed it in AstroPixelProcessor (how to here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-RMpuJ0I7wI).
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Lefty's Astrophotography
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Joined: Mon Mar 16, 2020 12:32 am

Re: Submissions: 2023 May

Post by Lefty's Astrophotography » Sun May 14, 2023 12:30 am

The Heart and Soul Nebulae: 110 hours 12 panel mosaic
The original image is over half a gigapixel in size, but I had to downsample it 2X in order to be under flickr's upload limit:
https://live.staticflickr.com/65535/528 ... 03b9_o.png

This is a combination of SHO exposures + RGB for the stars totaling 110 hours 18 minutes.
Captured using a 6" f/4 newtonian + ASI1600, on an Orion Sirius mount from my apartment balcony in Atlanta, GA (bortle 8). This was imaged over 35 nights from October 2022 through March 2023

Full acquisition/processing info can be found in the photo description:
https://www.flickr.com/photos/leftysast ... 2893566483

WolfHeart
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Posts: 34
Joined: Wed May 11, 2022 3:58 pm

Re: Submissions: 2023 May

Post by WolfHeart » Sun May 14, 2023 10:02 am

Eagle Nebula - SHO

My image processing of M16 - Eagle Nebula - Star Queen in the SHO color palette.
Data from Telescope Live.

SII 26 x 600"
Ha 26 x 600"
OIII 26 x 600"

Total Integration : 13hr

Obstech - Observatorio El Sauce
Telescope Live : CHI-1-CCD
Planewave CDK24
FLI ProLine PL9000


ImageEagle Nebula - HOO by Ahmed Waddah, on Flickr

https://www.astrobin.com/2rv466/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/waddah.photography
Astrobin: https://www.astrobin.com/users/WolfHeart/
IG: https://www.instagram.com/waddahphotography/

rkas12
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Posts: 27
Joined: Sun Jan 22, 2023 8:04 pm

Re: Submissions: 2023 May

Post by rkas12 » Sun May 14, 2023 7:26 pm

Vela Supernova - one of the most famous and beautiful “celestial cataclysm” located in the constellation Vela. Supernova remnants are the leftover results from the explosions of massive stars into supernovae.

Since Vela SNR isn’t visible from the North hemisphere where I live (Switzerland), I grab the data from the Heaven’s Mirror Observatory located in Australia. I am grateful for the data even though the pre-processing part took me quite a while to meet my qualitative requirements (pre-processing, data clean up, etc.).

The rendering of this image is a bi-color version obtained by combining two different narrowband filters whose wavelengths are different from one another: Oxygen III (500 nm) & Hydrogen alpha (650 nm). The details of the supernova remnants are mind-blowing. I took a particular care to enhance both the oxygen III and hydrogen-alpha emissions while minimizing the overwhelming effects of the stars.

I hope you will like it !

Details:
Copyright processing: @ae_astrophotons
Data: Heaven’s Mirror Observatory, Australia
Telescope: Takahashi FSQ 106Edx4
Camera: FLI PRO 16803
Total integration time: 9H


SkyViking
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Posts: 74
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 2010 8:18 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: Submissions: 2023 May

Post by SkyViking » Mon May 15, 2023 3:35 am

ImageAll the Waxing Moons by Rolf Wahl Olsen, on Flickr

All the Waxing Moons
This image is a composite of waxing Moon phases taken in May 2022. Details on the Moon's surface are normally best visible near the terminator where shadows reveal the dramatic landscape riddled with craters and mountain ranges. By combining many images taken at different waxing phases this resulting composite image shows detailed shadows across the entire near side of the Moon.
The subtle colours reveal the mineral composition of the Moon's surface, predominantly the lunar maria. The maria were formed by ancient basaltic flood volcanic eruptions that once covered low lying regions in a thick, nearly flat layer of solidified magma.

Image details:
Date: Luminance May 2022, colour March 2010
Exposure: Ha 120 x 0.1-0.3s, RGB: 500 x 1/1000s
Telescope: Homebuilt 12.5" f/4 + 10" f/5 Serrurier Truss Newtonians
Camera: QSI 683wsg with Lodestar guider + ToUCam Po SC1
Filters: Astrodon 3nm H-Alpha
Taken from my observatory in Auckland, New Zealand

SkyViking
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Posts: 74
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 2010 8:18 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: Submissions: 2023 May

Post by SkyViking » Mon May 15, 2023 3:38 am

Image
Amateur Detection of Spectrum and Lyman-alpha Forest of the Distant Ultra-luminous Quasar SMSSJ2157−3602 (z=4.692) by Rolf Wahl Olsen, on Flickr

This image shows the spectrum and Lyman-alpha forest of the very distant ultra-luminous quasar SMSSJ2157−3602, recorded with over 18 hours of exposure through a 12.5 inch f/4 Newtonian telescope and a StarAnalyzer diffraction grating.
This extreme object is the most luminous quasar discovered so far, being over 100 trillion times brighter than the Sun. The light from the quasar originates from the accretion disc of a supermassive black hole in the centre of a very distant galaxy 12.23 billion light years away. The black hole's mass has been measured at 34 billion solar masses, which makes it one of the most massive black holes in the known Universe.

The quasar is very faint in the optical range (G magnitude = 18.3) and has a very large redshift of z=4.692. This means that recording its spectrum with amateur equipment is extremely difficult as the peak emission is shifted heavily into the deep red and infrared where my CCD camera is not very sensitive. To make matters worse the diffraction grating also dims incoming light by approximately 6 magnitudes. But by combining 220 exposures of five minutes each through the grating I was able to clearly detect the zero order image of the quasar itself and also a very faint signal of its spectrum.

I wanted to identify the distinctive feature of the Lyman-alpha forest, to verify that I had indeed recorded the faint quasar spectrum. To do this I used RSpec to analyse the stacked image FITS file and create the calibrated spectrum profile. This profile was then exported as a 1D FITS file for further analysis and comparison with a reference spectrum. I downloaded a detailed quasar spectrum taken by the VLT X-Shooter instrument from the ESO Archive Science Portal: <a href="http://archive.eso.org/dataset/ADP.2019 ... :10:58.655" rel="noreferrer nofollow">archive.eso.org/dataset/ADP.2019-08-06T11:10:58.655</a> and then wrote a python script to plot my observed spectrum against the ESO reference spectrum. While my observation is on the very edge of what can be squeezed from a simple diffraction grating, the result clearly shows a good match with the features in the reference spectrum, particularly the Lyman-alpha forest and the peak near 700nm of the Ly-alpha emission line that has been redshifted from the extreme UV all the way into the deep red.

The Lyman-alpha forest is a series of absorption lines in the spectra of distant galaxies and quasars arising from the Lyman-alpha electron transition of the neutral hydrogen atom. As light from a very distant object travels across billion of light-years to reach us it will pass through many different gas clouds where the Lyman-alpha absorption will occur at different redshifts. This gives rise to a distinctive 'forest' of absorption lines in the spectra of distant quasars.

Image details:
Date: August-November 2022
Exposure: 18 hours 30 mins @ -25C
Telescope: Homebuilt 12.5" f/4 Serrurier Truss Newtonian
Camera: QSI 683wsg with Lodestar guider
Filters: StarAnalyzer 200 grating
Taken from my observatory in Auckland, New Zealand

Many thanks to Dr Christopher Onken, one of the discoverers of the quasar's extreme luminosity, who kindly assisted me with suggestions and finding the detailed reference spectrum to compare my observation against.

SkyViking
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Posts: 74
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 2010 8:18 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: Submissions: 2023 May

Post by SkyViking » Mon May 15, 2023 3:40 am

Image
Deep View of Peculiar Galaxy Pair Arp 171 by Rolf Wahl Olsen, on Flickr

This very deep exposure shows the rarely imaged interacting galaxy pair Arp 171.
The pair consists of the lenticular (S0) galaxies NGC5718 and IC1042, and lie at the heart of a galaxy cluster 400 million light years away towards the constellation Virgo.
The galaxies were discovered by William Herschel in 1786 and later classified in Halton Arp's Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies under the category 'galaxies with diffuse counter-tails'. While Arp only saw the bright central core regions, this long exposure reveals the full extent of the tidal streams and shells of stars that have been flung far outwards from the merging cores.
These extended structures form when the cores of merging galaxies orbit around their common centre of mass in an ever tighter orbit while disrupting the halos of both galaxies and sending billions of stars into eccentric orbits. The halos of this pair of merging galaxies appear somewhat diffuse but the process can give rise to outward traveling density waves in the form of very distinct shells, such as those in NGC3923, until the collision eventually settles as one single large galaxy.
Several smaller members of the cluster can be seen around the merging galaxy pair, and in the background numerous other more distant galaxies can be seen. Near the top edge of the image lies a very distant galaxy cluster, visibly reddened by the cosmological redshift at very large distances.
Draped across the view is a thin veil of wispy filaments; ghostly structures that are known as galactic cirrus, or Integrated Flux Nebula (IFN). Only a few decades ago such structures were often removed in image processing, as they were thought to be instrument artifacts or image defects. However, these ultra faint patches of nebulousity are real and consist of thin traces of gas and dust which is not directly illuminated by stars but merely reflect the extremely faint combined glow of the Milky Way.

Image details:
Date: March - May 2022
Exposure: LRGB: 1935:280:280:250 mins, total 50 hours 15 mins @ -25C
Telescope: Homebuilt 12.5" f/4 Serrurier Truss Newtonian
Camera: QSI 683wsg with Lodestar guider
Filters: Astrodon LRGB E-Series Gen 2
Taken from my observatory in Auckland, New Zealand

SkyViking
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Posts: 74
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 2010 8:18 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: Submissions: 2023 May

Post by SkyViking » Mon May 15, 2023 3:47 am

Image
The Cosmic Web by Rolf Wahl Olsen, on Flickr
The Large-Scale Structure of the Universe
Of all my images I feel that this one is the most profound: A relatively empty looking field in the southern constellation Fornax, about the size of the full Moon. This area of the sky is devoid of most bright stars, and contains almost no obscuring interstellar dust or hydrogen emission. It is therefore a window out into the deepest reaches of the observable Universe. It is also the location of the famous Hubble Ultra Deep Field and several other HST studies over the last couple of decades.
With around 60 hours of exposure the limiting magnitude is close to 25.0 which is 25 million times fainter than the dimmest naked-eye stars.

At this depth, the background is filled with tens of thousands of distant galaxies. But to see them properly, we must go on a journey - outside of our own Milky Way galaxy. To filter the many background galaxies from the foreground stars I used Gaia DR3 data to identify and remove all stars in the image, and thus revealing just the extragalactic background.
Every single point of light in the resulting image is a galaxy!
There are over 20,000 distant galaxies in this single image. With redshifts of up to z=3.354 the farthest are nearly 12 billion light years away. At that distance the field of view spans an incredible 112 x 147 million light years.
It is clearly noticeable that the galaxies are not distributed randomly. Instead, galaxy groups and clusters form long filaments with massive voids in between. This vast foam-like structure is known as the Cosmic Web; the large-scale structure of the Universe.
Tiny primordial fluctuations in the dark matter distribution immediately after the Big Bang gave rise to these immense structures, created and shaped by gravity. Their origins are imprinted on the cosmic microwave background observed by the Planck satellite - the oldest light in the Universe.

See this image https://www.rolfolsenastrophotography.c ... /i-FNxSNwN for a version including the foreground stars.

Image Processing
After the raw data was calibrated and combined in PixInsight, the foreground stars were identified using a custom catalogue of sources in the field-of-view generated from Gaia DR3.
PixInsight was used to annotate the image and labelling all stellar sources. A manual inspection then identified a further handful of sources as being obviously extraglactic and these were removed from the custom catalogue.
A special starmask purely consisting of the foreground stars was then made using the custom catalog data.
A starless image of the entire field was created by applying StarNet processs in PixInsight. This removed all point sources in the image, including all the faint background galaxies, so to create an image that reveals only the distant extragalactic background objects the starless image was then re-combined with the original image but using the Gaia data starmask. The result is a starless image showing only extragalctic sources!

Cross-checking against the available Hubble Ultra Deep Field catalogues using VizieR, approximately 190 galaxies were identified within the HUDF catalogued area. Assuming the HUDF to be representative of the entire image, and indeed the entire sky, this can be extrapolated to over 23,000 galaxies in this field alone, and over 2.5 billion galaxies visible in the entire sky at this depth.

Code: Select all

Resolution ............... 0.765 arcsec/px
Rotation ................. 178.892 deg
Reference system ......... ICRS
Geodetic coordinates ..... 174 45 00 E  36 51 00 N  240 m
Focal distance ........... 1456.58 mm
Pixel size ............... 5.40 um
Field of view ............ 42' 23.3" x 31' 54.8"
Image center ............. RA:  3 32 39.046  Dec: -27 47 28.96
Image bounds:
   top-left .............. RA:  3 31 04.405  Dec: -28 03 48.48
   top-right ............. RA:  3 34 16.452  Dec: -28 03 00.18
   bottom-left ........... RA:  3 31 02.103  Dec: -27 31 53.49
   bottom-right .......... RA:  3 34 13.213  Dec: -27 31 05.42
Image Acquisition:
Date: Nov 2021 - Feb 2022
Exposure: LRGB: 2850:250:225:225 mins, total 59 hours 10 mins @ -25C
Telescope: Homebuilt 12.5" f/4 Serrurier Truss Newtonian
Camera: QSI 683wsg with Lodestar guider
Filters: Astrodon LRGB E-Series Gen 2
Taken from my observatory in Auckland, New Zealand

strongmanmike

Deep Antennae Galaxies

Post by strongmanmike » Mon May 15, 2023 8:24 am

At a height of 1450m above mean sea level, I have recently commissioned Australia’s highest astronomical observatory, up in the Tinderry Mountains, 55km south of our capital city of Canberra:

https://pbase.com/strongmanmike2002/ima ... 37441/auto and https://pbase.com/strongmanmike2002/eag ... bservatory

First light for the new observatory was in October 2022 but this image submission, taken over four beautiful clear moonless nights in late April 2023, is the first truly deep image taken from the new observatory, to take full advantage of the sites excellent conditions (for Australia 😊)

Seeing is generally between 1.5”- 2.0” (occasionally dipping down to 1.2”) and the skies are very dark and contrasty up at 1450m above mean sea level, SQM readings sit around 21.90 but have reached beyond 22.00 on the very best, clean air, low solar activity nights: https://pbase.com/strongmanmike2002/ima ... 9/original

This is a deep look (24hr exposure) at the Antennae Galaxies in Corvus and referencing previous deep work by Rolf Olsen and confirmed via photometric calibration of the integrated FITS luminance file, against the USNO catalogues, reaches a limiting magnitude of almost 25.

At this depth, a very faint halo extension, all around the galaxy is revealed and while it can be seen in the full size colour version, as an outer gossamer glow, slightly stretching the luminance data and viewing in B&W, better reveals the very faint outer halo surrounding these two galaxies. Doing this, also shows this outer halo is surprisingly extensive, extending out quite some way around both galaxies and in all directions. There are billowing extensions at the end of each "antennae" too and the long antenna now appears almost like two star streams, side by side, running parallel to each other!

The full frame, full resolution, full colour image can be found here: https://pbase.com/strongmanmike2002/ima ... 5/original

The enhanced luminance, showing the outer halo, can be found here: https://pbase.com/strongmanmike2002/ima ... 3/original

Copyright: Michael Sidonio

Kinch
Science Officer
Posts: 190
Joined: Sat Mar 19, 2016 1:53 pm

Re: Submissions: 2023 May

Post by Kinch » Mon May 15, 2023 5:56 pm

Reflection & Emission

M20 - Trifid Nebula
Final_crop_m20-sign May 2023 (1494 x 1089).jpg
Click on above to enlarge.

Full info @ https://www.kinchastro.com/m20---trifid-nebula.html
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sydney
Science Officer
Posts: 143
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2013 1:51 am

Re: Submissions: 2023 May

Post by sydney » Tue May 16, 2023 12:17 am

Sunflower Galaxy M63

The Sunflower Galaxy floats in the constellation Canes Venatici at a distance of about 30 million light-years from Earth. It is commonly referred to as a flocculent galaxy due to the lack of well-defined spiral arms in visible light; however, near infrared images reveal a symmetric two arm structure. The star streams are believed to be remnants of tidally disrupted satellite galaxies.

Processing was done in CCDStack and Photoshop. I hope you enjoy!

Nick Pavelchak
https://www.astrobin.com/a3cel7/
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sydney
Science Officer
Posts: 143
Joined: Sun Jan 13, 2013 1:51 am

Re: Submissions: 2023 May

Post by sydney » Tue May 16, 2023 12:20 am

Grand-Design Spiral Galaxy M100

M100 is a grand-design spiral galaxy that is bursting with star formation. Located in the constellation Coma Berenices, it is one of the largest members of the Virgo Cluster. Luminous extensions of its sweeping outer arms connect M100 with two satellite galaxies NGC 4323 and NGC 4328. Observations of Cepheid variable stars in M100 place its distance at about 56 million light-years from Earth.

Processing was done in CCDStack and Photoshop. I hope you enjoy!

Nick Pavelchak
https://www.astrobin.com/jxa4te/
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