APOD: Total Eclipse: The Big Corona (2023 May 16)

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APOD: Total Eclipse: The Big Corona (2023 May 16)

Post by APOD Robot » Tue May 16, 2023 4:08 am

Image Total Eclipse: The Big Corona

Explanation: Most photographs don't adequately portray the magnificence of the Sun's corona. Seeing the corona first-hand during a total solar eclipse is unparalleled. The human eye can adapt to see coronal features and extent that average cameras usually cannot. Welcome, however, to the digital age. The featured image digitally combined short and long exposures taken in Exmouth, Australia that were processed to highlight faint and extended features in the corona during the total solar eclipse that occurred in April of 2023. Clearly visible are intricate layers and glowing caustics of an ever changing mixture of hot gas and magnetic fields in the Sun's corona. Looping prominences appear bright pink just past the Sun's edge. Images taken seconds before and after the total eclipse show glimpses of the background Sun known as Baily's Beads and diamond ring effect. The next total solar eclipse will cross North America in April of 2024.

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Rauf
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Re: APOD: Total Eclipse: The Big Corona (2023 May 16)

Post by Rauf » Tue May 16, 2023 6:33 am

Total Solar Eclipse is a rare phenomenon and not all humans are lucky enough to observe it.
Unfortunately for me, the last total solar eclipse visible in our country happened in 1999, I wasn't born back then.
But fortunately, the next total eclipse will be in 2034, and it's visible in my own city as well! What's more, It's happening just couple of hours before persian new year starts and It's gonna be a holiday.
Persian new year starts exactly with Spring Equinox, and it's months are based on Solstices and equinoxes around the year.
I really can't wait to observe it! :D

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Re: APOD: Total Eclipse: The Big Corona (2023 May 16)

Post by Cousin Ricky » Tue May 16, 2023 12:58 pm

The photo even captures the surface features of the Moon.

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Re: APOD: Total Eclipse: The Big Corona (2023 May 16)

Post by Chris Peterson » Tue May 16, 2023 2:18 pm

Cousin Ricky wrote: Tue May 16, 2023 12:58 pm The photo even captures the surface features of the Moon.
Which makes sense for a high dynamic range image, given that the Moon is facing the fully sunlit face of the Earth during a solar eclipse, so Earthshine is maximal (and brighter than the dimmest parts of the corona). I've seen Earthshine visually during total solar eclipses.
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Rauf
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Re: APOD: Total Eclipse: The Big Corona (2023 May 16)

Post by Rauf » Tue May 16, 2023 2:22 pm

Chris Peterson wrote: Tue May 16, 2023 2:18 pm
Cousin Ricky wrote: Tue May 16, 2023 12:58 pm The photo even captures the surface features of the Moon.
Which makes sense for a high dynamic range image, given that the Moon is facing the fully sunlit face of the Earth during a solar eclipse, so Earthshine is maximal (and brighter than the dimmest parts of the corona). I've seen Earthshine visually during total solar eclipses.
I wonder if that part of the Earth that's under moon's shadow has any significant effect on Earthshine..?

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Re: APOD: Total Eclipse: The Big Corona (2023 May 16)

Post by Chris Peterson » Tue May 16, 2023 2:25 pm

Rauf wrote: Tue May 16, 2023 2:22 pm
Chris Peterson wrote: Tue May 16, 2023 2:18 pm
Cousin Ricky wrote: Tue May 16, 2023 12:58 pm The photo even captures the surface features of the Moon.
Which makes sense for a high dynamic range image, given that the Moon is facing the fully sunlit face of the Earth during a solar eclipse, so Earthshine is maximal (and brighter than the dimmest parts of the corona). I've seen Earthshine visually during total solar eclipses.
I wonder if that part of the Earth that's under moon's shadow has any significant effect on Earthshine..?
No. Ever seen an image of the Earth from space during a total eclipse? The shadow is just a tiny spot.
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6a0105371bb32c970b014e89fdf603970d.jpg
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Rauf
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Re: APOD: Total Eclipse: The Big Corona (2023 May 16)

Post by Rauf » Tue May 16, 2023 2:46 pm

Chris Peterson wrote: Tue May 16, 2023 2:25 pm
Rauf wrote: Tue May 16, 2023 2:22 pm
Chris Peterson wrote: Tue May 16, 2023 2:18 pm
Which makes sense for a high dynamic range image, given that the Moon is facing the fully sunlit face of the Earth during a solar eclipse, so Earthshine is maximal (and brighter than the dimmest parts of the corona). I've seen Earthshine visually during total solar eclipses.
I wonder if that part of the Earth that's under moon's shadow has any significant effect on Earthshine..?
No. Ever seen an image of the Earth from space during a total eclipse? The shadow is just a tiny spot.
_
6a0105371bb32c970b014e89fdf603970d.jpg
I see, thanks. So if you stand on the moon during a total solar eclipse and in the night, You can actually find your way on the surface, because there is enough light to see. I am wondering, If Artemis astronauts will be on the moon during a total solar eclipse. That would be a sight to see!!

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Re: APOD: Total Eclipse: The Big Corona (2023 May 16)

Post by Sa Ji Tario » Tue May 16, 2023 5:38 pm

In a total eclipde of the Moon, the disk of the Earth is larger than the disk of the Moon, but due to an optical effect, part of the light that touches the terrestrial horizon and due to the effect of the atmosphere itself, curves towards the center, causing a part of the rays come to illuminate the lunar surface (ashy light), wouldn't the same thing happen with the lights of distant stars in a total eclipse of the Sun when their light passes through the solar atmosphere making them see closer to limbo?, after the withdrawal of the Sun in the area is seen more separated saying that it was due to the effect of the great solar gravity?. The image shows the amplitude of said atmosphere. Am I wrong in my reasoning?
To this we must add the lunar gravity that pulls something

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Re: APOD: Total Eclipse: The Big Corona (2023 May 16)

Post by Chris Peterson » Tue May 16, 2023 5:51 pm

Sa Ji Tario wrote: Tue May 16, 2023 5:38 pm In a total eclipde of the Moon, the disk of the Earth is larger than the disk of the Moon, but due to an optical effect, part of the light that touches the terrestrial horizon and due to the effect of the atmosphere itself, curves towards the center, causing a part of the rays come to illuminate the lunar surface (ashy light), wouldn't the same thing happen with the lights of distant stars in a total eclipse of the Sun when their light passes through the solar atmosphere making them see closer to limbo?, after the withdrawal of the Sun in the area is seen more separated saying that it was due to the effect of the great solar gravity?. The image shows the amplitude of said atmosphere. Am I wrong in my reasoning?
To this we must add the lunar gravity that pulls something
The solar atmosphere is too thin to appreciably bend light the way Earth's atmosphere does. The Sun's gravity does measurably bend the path of light, making nearby stars appear in the wrong place... something first measured by Eddington during an eclipse in 1919, presenting some of the earliest experimental verification of Einstein's ideas about gravity (although at the time the theory was still not quite right, not fully developed GR).
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Re: APOD: Total Eclipse: The Big Corona (2023 May 16)

Post by johnnydeep » Tue May 16, 2023 8:44 pm

"glowing caustics"? - ah, here we go:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caustic_(optics) wrote:In optics, a caustic or caustic network[1] is the envelope of light rays which have been reflected or refracted by a curved surface or object, or the projection of that envelope of rays on another surface.[2] The caustic is a curve or surface to which each of the light rays is tangent, defining a boundary of an envelope of rays as a curve of concentrated light.[2] Therefore, in the photo to the right, caustics can be seen as patches of light or their bright edges. These shapes often have cusp singularities.
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Re: APOD: Total Eclipse: The Big Corona (2023 May 16)

Post by orin stepanek » Wed May 17, 2023 12:55 am

BigCorona2023_Wittich_960.jpg
Magnificent is the Sun's corona! 8-)
64310547_1612916445509927_1944194861536116736_n.jpg
Kitties are pretty cool also! :lol2:
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Re: APOD: Total Eclipse: The Big Corona (2023 May 16)

Post by Chris Peterson » Wed May 17, 2023 2:56 am

johnnydeep wrote: Tue May 16, 2023 8:44 pm "glowing caustics"? - ah, here we go:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caustic_(optics) wrote:In optics, a caustic or caustic network[1] is the envelope of light rays which have been reflected or refracted by a curved surface or object, or the projection of that envelope of rays on another surface.[2] The caustic is a curve or surface to which each of the light rays is tangent, defining a boundary of an envelope of rays as a curve of concentrated light.[2] Therefore, in the photo to the right, caustics can be seen as patches of light or their bright edges. These shapes often have cusp singularities.
Yeah, these are not caustics. They merely resemble them visually.
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Re: APOD: Total Eclipse: The Big Corona (2023 May 16)

Post by johnnydeep » Wed May 17, 2023 3:55 pm

Chris Peterson wrote: Wed May 17, 2023 2:56 am
johnnydeep wrote: Tue May 16, 2023 8:44 pm "glowing caustics"? - ah, here we go:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caustic_(optics) wrote:In optics, a caustic or caustic network[1] is the envelope of light rays which have been reflected or refracted by a curved surface or object, or the projection of that envelope of rays on another surface.[2] The caustic is a curve or surface to which each of the light rays is tangent, defining a boundary of an envelope of rays as a curve of concentrated light.[2] Therefore, in the photo to the right, caustics can be seen as patches of light or their bright edges. These shapes often have cusp singularities.
Yeah, these are not caustics. They merely resemble them visually.
Right, I gathered the term was only being used figuratively.
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