Found Images: 2023 September

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bystander
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ESA: A Peculiar Proceeding (Arp 107)

Post by bystander » Tue Sep 19, 2023 3:18 pm

A Peculiar Proceeding
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2023 Sep 18
This Hubble Picture of the Week — taken using NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) — shows Arp 107, a celestial object that comprises a pair of galaxies in the midst of a collision. The larger galaxy (in the left of this image) is an extremely energetic galaxy type known as a Seyfert galaxy, which house active galactic nuclei at their cores. Seyfert galaxies are notable because despite the immense brightness of the active core, radiation from the entire galaxy can be observed. This is evident in this image, where the spiraling whorls of the whole galaxy are readily visible. The smaller companion is connected to the larger by a tenuous-seeming ‘bridge’, composed of dust and gas. The colliding galactic duo lie about 465 million light-years from Earth.

Arp 107 is part of a catalogue of 338 galaxies known as the Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies, which was compiled in 1966 by Halton Arp. It was observed by Hubble as part of an observing programme that specifically sought to fill in an observational ‘gap’, by taking limited observations of members of the Arp catalogue. Part of the intention of the observing programme was to provide the public with images of these spectacular and not-easily-defined galaxies, and as such, it has provided a rich source for Hubble Pictures of the Week. In fact, several recent releases, including this one and this one, have made use of observations from the same observing programme.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
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Victor Lima
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by Victor Lima » Tue Sep 19, 2023 6:35 pm

Category: Single Exposure Panorama
Social IG: victorlimaphoto
Story:
The Milky Way crosses the sky of Piedras Rojas while the Zodiacal Light and Air Glow complement the night sky spectacle of the Atacama Desert in Chile.
Situated in the Atacama Desert, the Piedras Rojas is specifically located near the Argentinian border, approximately 150 kilometers southeast of the town of San Pedro de Atacama. As the name suggests, the most prominent feature of this area is the reddish rocks and formations. Adjacent to the red rock formations are a few altiplanic lagoons. The high salt concentration of these lagoons gives the water a reflective quality, providing visitors with breathtaking views of the surrounding.
Dominating the upper third of the frame is the dense, cloudy stretch of the Milky Way. This band, filled with millions of stars, clusters, and interstellar dust, offers a rich tonal gradient, transitioning from a brighter core to fainter edges. The central bulge, with a higher concentration of stars, appears more pronounced and is the visual anchor of the Milky Way in this image.
Radiating from the horizon and stretching towards the Milky Way’s core is the Zodiacal Light. This is an elongated, faint, triangular glow, appearing opposite the setting or rising sun. It is a result of sunlight scattering off interplanetary dust particles that lie in the plane of the solar system. Its presence is indicative of the image being taken shortly after sunset or just before sunrise and serves to bridge the gap between the terrestrial and celestial components of the photo.
Providing a vivid color palette against the backdrop of space, the air glow appears as faint ripples of luminescence, manifesting in shades of red, green, and even purple. This phenomenon is caused by the recombination of atoms and molecules that were photoionized by the sun during the day, combined with chemiluminescence, where chemical reactions in the upper atmosphere produce light. Its patchy distribution lends an uneven, wavy texture to the night sky, juxtaposing the more uniform, granular spread of the Milky Way stars.
EXIF:
15/september/2023 09:43pm
Canon 6Da / Rokinon 12mm f:2.8 fisheye
8X 30 sec / f:2.8 / ISO 6400 (Panorama)

ImagePiedras Rojas - Atacama Desert by Victor Lima, no Flickr

starsurfer
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Re: ESA: A Peculiar Proceeding (Arp 107)

Post by starsurfer » Tue Sep 19, 2023 10:00 pm

bystander wrote: Tue Sep 19, 2023 3:18 pm A Peculiar Proceeding
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2023 Sep 18
This Hubble Picture of the Week — taken using NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) — shows Arp 107, a celestial object that comprises a pair of galaxies in the midst of a collision. The larger galaxy (in the left of this image) is an extremely energetic galaxy type known as a Seyfert galaxy, which house active galactic nuclei at their cores. Seyfert galaxies are notable because despite the immense brightness of the active core, radiation from the entire galaxy can be observed. This is evident in this image, where the spiraling whorls of the whole galaxy are readily visible. The smaller companion is connected to the larger by a tenuous-seeming ‘bridge’, composed of dust and gas. The colliding galactic duo lie about 465 million light-years from Earth.

Arp 107 is part of a catalogue of 338 galaxies known as the Atlas of Peculiar Galaxies, which was compiled in 1966 by Halton Arp. It was observed by Hubble as part of an observing programme that specifically sought to fill in an observational ‘gap’, by taking limited observations of members of the Arp catalogue. Part of the intention of the observing programme was to provide the public with images of these spectacular and not-easily-defined galaxies, and as such, it has provided a rich source for Hubble Pictures of the Week. In fact, several recent releases, including this one and this one, have made use of observations from the same observing programme.
I've always wanted to see a Hubble image of this!

starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Tue Sep 19, 2023 10:02 pm

Fal 2
https://www.astrobin.com/wwsxts/
Copyright: Bray Falls
dz_89UCb6STD_16536x0_1-f0JFSA.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Tue Sep 19, 2023 10:06 pm

Fr 2-30
https://www.starscapeimaging.com/Fr2-30/FR2-30.html
Copyright: Jon Talbot
FR2_30.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Thu Sep 21, 2023 10:36 pm

M15 and NGC 7094
https://www.astrobin.com/zp787i/
Copyright: Alexander Reinders
1YOFXkR1TsJl_2560x0_Xq0n3llo.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Thu Sep 21, 2023 10:38 pm

NGC 7217
https://www.astrobin.com/jd3gwh/
Copyright: Eric Coles
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Thu Sep 21, 2023 10:41 pm

NGC 7331 and Stephan's Quintet
https://www.astrobin.com/xenblp/
Copyright: Nedim Bevrnja
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Sat Sep 23, 2023 10:18 pm

NGC 3717
http://www.astrostudio.at/1_Deep%20Sky% ... GC3717.jpg
Copyright: Gerald Rhemann
NGC3717.jpg
This image shows a small part of the Antlia Supernova Remnant, which has a size of 26x20 degrees!
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Sat Sep 23, 2023 10:20 pm

NGC 1964
https://www.chart32.de/index.php/component/k2/item/328
Copyright: CHART32
Processing: Bernd Flach-Wilken

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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Mon Sep 25, 2023 10:47 pm

Owl Cluster (NGC 457)
https://www.astrobin.com/rlozcr/
Copyright: Peter Oberč
87lf2vm7baTG_16536x0__4ixdjad.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Mon Sep 25, 2023 10:49 pm

IC 2531
https://www.flickr.com/photos/97807083@N00/51846008804/
Copyright: Terry Robison
51846008804_e7e5e15ec9.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Mon Sep 25, 2023 10:52 pm

Integral Sign Galaxy (UGC 3697)
https://www.astrobin.com/t32ao9/
Copyright: Roberto Marinoni
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Mon Sep 25, 2023 10:53 pm

NGC 3184
https://www.astrobin.com/49737k/
Copyright: Patrice Renaut
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Mon Sep 25, 2023 10:56 pm

Praesepe (M44)
https://www.astrobin.com/yvsxb9/B/
Copyright: Ola Skarpen
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Sat Sep 30, 2023 10:36 pm

IC 5332
https://members.pcug.org.au/~stevec/ic5 ... 3_2023.htm
Copyright: Steve Crouch
ic5332.jpg
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NOIRLab: Galactic Face-off (NGC 454)

Post by bystander » Mon Oct 02, 2023 2:16 pm

Galactic Face-off
NOIRLab Image of the Week | CTIO | 2023 Sep 20
Far, far away in the constellation Phoenix, two interacting galaxies meet in an epic battle spanning a hundred thousand light-years, captured here with the Víctor M. Blanco 4-meter Telescope at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO), a Program of NSF’s NOIRLab. Collectively known as NGC 454, the upper galaxy is a red elliptical galaxy called NGC 454 E, while below it is NGC 454 W, a blue, gas-rich irregular galaxy. Despite being in the early stages of their interaction, both galaxies already show severe distortion. Remnants of both galaxies have been stretched far beyond their main bodies, from the disarray of both galaxies’ stellar populations at the top right of this image to the globular clusters forming at NGC 454 W’s bottom-left side. Dust lanes from the dynamic interaction cross NGC 454 E, and NGC 454 W barely looks like the disk galaxy it was thought to be. The early merger is further evidenced by the veil of a low surface brightness halo surrounding the galaxies as well as the myriad of young stars that populate the system. Now gravitationally bound together, the fight of NGC 454 will end when the two galaxies eventually combine into one.

This interacting pair was captured by the Dark Energy Camera (DECam) made by the US Department of Energy as part of the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument (DESI) Legacy Imaging Surveys.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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ESO: A Laser Show on Paranal (VLT)

Post by bystander » Mon Oct 02, 2023 2:31 pm

A Laser Show on Paranal
ESO Picture of the Week | VLT | 2023 Sep 25
It’s hard not to get sucked into this Picture of the Week, taken using a long exposure at ESO’s Paranal Observatory in the Chilean Atacama Desert. Above the mountaintop observatory, a spectacular dance is playing out: imaged over several hours, stars appear to make their way in long arcs, called star trails, across the night sky.

Paranal is home to one of the world’s most advanced optical telescopes: ESO’s Very Large Telescope, or VLT. This flagship facility actually consists of four Unit Telescopes and four smaller movable Auxiliary Telescopes, like the one in the foreground on the right.

But what are those mysterious beams of orange light erupting from one of the Unit Telescopes? Well, they’re for making stars, kind of. The Four Laser Guide Star Facility propagates laser beams[1] into the sky, making sodium atoms in the upper atmosphere glow like artificial stars. Each laser delivers 22 watts of power — about 4000 times the maximum allowed for a laser pointer — in a beam that’s about 30 centimetres in diameter. This remarkable display doesn’t just look pretty: the twinkling of these artificial stars is measured in real time and used by the adaptive optics system to correct for the blurring caused by the Earth’s atmosphere so that the telescope can create sharp images.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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ESA: What’s in a Name?

Post by bystander » Mon Oct 02, 2023 2:46 pm

What’s in a Name?
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2023 Sep 25
This Hubble Picture of the Week includes the pithily-named galaxy SDSS J103512.07+461412.2, visible in the centre of this image as a dispersed sweep of dust and stars with a denser, brighter core. SDSS J103512.07+461412.2 is located 23 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Ursa Major. The seemingly rambling name is because this galaxy was observed as part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), a massive survey that began in 2000 with the aim of observing and cataloguing vast numbers of astronomical objects. So far, it has recorded several hundred million astronomical objects.

In the early days of astronomy catalogues, astronomers painstakingly recorded individual objects one by one. As an example, the Messier catalogue includes only 110 objects, identified by the astronomer Charles Messier because they were all getting in the way of his comet-hunting efforts. As the Messier catalogue is so limited, it is sufficient to simply refer to those objects as M1 to M110. In contrast, when a survey as massive in scope as the SDSS is involved, and when huge volumes of data need to be processed in an automated manner, the names assigned to objects need to be both longer, and more informative. ...
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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NOIRLab: Maunakea’s Shadow (Gemini North)

Post by bystander » Mon Oct 02, 2023 2:54 pm

Maunakea’s Shadow
NOIRLab Image of the Week | Gemini North | 2023 Sep 27
This image, taken at sunrise, shows the blue shadow of Maunakea in Hawai‘i, home to the Gemini North telescope, tapering into an eerily symmetrical triangle. While Maunakea is vaguely triangular in shape, it is far from a perfect Euclidean pyramid, so why should the shadow appear so symmetrical?

An identical triangular shadow phenomenon can be seen from the tops of many mountains or volcanoes at sunset or sunrise. The key to understanding this effect is that the viewer is staring down a lengthy ‘corridor’ of a sunrise (or sunset) shadow that reaches to the horizon. Even if the massive volcano were a perfect cube, a column, or really any other shape, the resulting shadow would appear to taper off at its summit as this part of the shadow extends far into the distance. You can see a similar effect with parallel railroad lines, hallways, or any other long and straight corridor.

Gemini North is part of the International Gemini Observatory, which is operated by NSF’s NOIRLab.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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ESA: NIRCam’s View of NGC 6822

Post by bystander » Mon Oct 02, 2023 3:10 pm

NIRCam’s View of NGC 6822
ESA Webb Picture of the Month | 2023 Sep 27
potm2309a[1].jpg
A huge, dense field completely filled with tiny stars. A few of the star images are a bit
larger than the rest, with visible diffraction spikes; two foreground stars are large and
bright on the right side. Many small galaxies within various shapes and sizes can be
seen hiding behind the stars. In the centre some faint, wispy, dark red gas appears.
(Image Credit: ESA/Webb, NASA & CSA, M. Meixner)
This image shows the irregular galaxy NGC 6822, as observed by the Near-InfraRed Camera (NIRCam) mounted on the NASA/ESA/CSA James Webb Space Telescope. NIRCam probes the near-infrared, which in this case makes it suitable for observing the densely packed star field.

Webb’s near-infrared NIRCam image shows the galaxy’s countless stars in incredible detail. Here, the dust and gas that pervade the galaxy are reduced to translucent red wisps, laying the stars bare for astronomical study. The power of Webb’s ice-cold infrared instruments and the incredible resolution of its primary mirror is necessary to examine stars hidden in dusty environments, and the results as shown here are spectacular.

The brightest stars appear in pale blue and cyan colours in this image, colours which are assigned to the shortest wavelengths of light that NIRCam can detect: red and nearest infrared. The amount of light emitted by any star decreases at longer and longer wavelengths, towards the mid-infrared, so the stars that are more faint to NIRCam also appear more warmly coloured here. A bright blue orb to the lower left of the gas is particularly prominent: this is a globular cluster, packed with stars.

A composite image of NGC 6822 featuring data from both NIRCam and Webb’s Mid-InfraRed Instrument (MIRI) was published for the ESA/Webb Picture of the Month series in July 2023.
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Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
— Garrison Keillor