Submissions: 2023 October

See new, spectacular, or mysterious sky images.
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Chris Peterson
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Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by Chris Peterson » Fri Oct 06, 2023 12:47 am

Evolution of a Supernova
Two images of SN 2023ixf in M101. The first is within a few days of peak intensity; the second from yesterday. 134 days of cooling off, from a hot, bright source to a cool, orange remnant. Orange because it has cooled down, and maybe because of dust scattering from a possible shell around the supernova.

Details:
QSI 660 camera on 250mm RC, Astronomic RGB filters
2023-05-23 image: 130 minutes each RGB
2023-10-04 image: 42 minutes each RGB
Processed with PixInsight and Photoshop
_
comp2_2k_a.jpg
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Ann
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Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by Ann » Fri Oct 06, 2023 5:18 am

Chris Peterson wrote: Fri Oct 06, 2023 12:47 am Evolution of a Supernova
Two images of SN 2023ixf in M101. The first is within a few days of peak intensity; the second from yesterday. 134 days of cooling off, from a hot, bright source to a cool, orange remnant. Orange because it has cooled down, and maybe because of dust scattering from a possible shell around the supernova.

Details:
QSI 660 camera on 250mm RC, Astronomic RGB filters
2023-05-23 image: 130 minutes each RGB
2023-10-04 image: 42 minutes each RGB
Processed with PixInsight and Photoshop
_
Fascinating, Chris! Thanks!

It's interesting that the supernova is still bright enough to be still very clearly visible after more than six months. Of course, SN 2023ixf was a type SN II-L supernova, and they fade slowly:
Wikipedia wrote:
When the luminosity of a Type II supernova is plotted over a period of time, it shows a characteristic rise to a peak brightness followed by a decline. These light curves have an average decay rate of 0.008 magnitudes per day; much lower than the decay rate for Type Ia supernovae.
To me it is interesting that in your picture, the supernova looks very slightly yellow-white when it was near peak brightness. Other images show it as being very slightly bluish at peak brightness, which seems more resonable to me.

It is a well-established fact that supernovas grow progressively redder as they fade, so the orange color in the second picture seems spot on.

Ann
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Chris Peterson
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Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by Chris Peterson » Fri Oct 06, 2023 3:05 pm

Ann wrote: Fri Oct 06, 2023 5:18 am
Chris Peterson wrote: Fri Oct 06, 2023 12:47 am Evolution of a Supernova
Two images of SN 2023ixf in M101. The first is within a few days of peak intensity; the second from yesterday. 134 days of cooling off, from a hot, bright source to a cool, orange remnant. Orange because it has cooled down, and maybe because of dust scattering from a possible shell around the supernova.

Details:
QSI 660 camera on 250mm RC, Astronomic RGB filters
2023-05-23 image: 130 minutes each RGB
2023-10-04 image: 42 minutes each RGB
Processed with PixInsight and Photoshop
_
Fascinating, Chris! Thanks!

It's interesting that the supernova is still bright enough to be still very clearly visible after more than six months. Of course, SN 2023ixf was a type SN II-L supernova, and they fade slowly:
Wikipedia wrote:
When the luminosity of a Type II supernova is plotted over a period of time, it shows a characteristic rise to a peak brightness followed by a decline. These light curves have an average decay rate of 0.008 magnitudes per day; much lower than the decay rate for Type Ia supernovae.
To me it is interesting that in your picture, the supernova looks very slightly yellow-white when it was near peak brightness. Other images show it as being very slightly bluish at peak brightness, which seems more resonable to me.

It is a well-established fact that supernovas grow progressively redder as they fade, so the orange color in the second picture seems spot on.

Ann
Yeah, can't really trust the color in the first image. The SN is so bright that it saturates, and since blue is brightest, it saturates first, which pushes the color away from blue. It might be an interesting exercise to figure out a way to keep both the color and the intensity in alignment with the rest of the image. That said, looking at the raw linear data, I can calculate the scaled RGB values as 147, 175, 255 = ███.

(Actually, type II-L supernovas fade fairly quickly; it is type II-P supernovas that persist longer. But this SN exhibited a short plateau phase, so its classification is a bit uncertain. I've seen it described in papers as a "hybrid II-P/II-L supernova".)
Last edited by Chris Peterson on Fri Oct 06, 2023 5:07 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Cloudbait Observatory
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Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by Christian G. » Fri Oct 06, 2023 4:13 pm

Chris Peterson wrote: Fri Oct 06, 2023 12:47 am Evolution of a Supernova
Two images of SN 2023ixf in M101. The first is within a few days of peak intensity; the second from yesterday. 134 days of cooling off, from a hot, bright source to a cool, orange remnant. Orange because it has cooled down, and maybe because of dust scattering from a possible shell around the supernova.

Details:
QSI 660 camera on 250mm RC, Astronomic RGB filters
2023-05-23 image: 130 minutes each RGB
2023-10-04 image: 42 minutes each RGB
Processed with PixInsight and Photoshop
_
comp2_2k_a.jpg
Fascinating comparaison, I've been waiting to see this! Is there any clue in that remnant indicating whether we have a neutron star or a black hole?

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Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by Anil Monnier » Fri Oct 06, 2023 4:22 pm

https://i.ibb.co/Zhz0YXb/with-watermark.jpg

Rosette’s Hidden Heart - Stars Beyond the Rosette: Rosette Nebula in SHO and star clusters by the Chandra X-ray Observatory:

Explanation: Visible light stars have been removed from this narrow-band image of the Rosette Nebula, a star-forming region some 5,200 light-years away toward the constellation Monoceros. Then, stars in X-ray data (in red) from the Chandra X-ray Observatory were digitally added back to the resulting starless image. This merged multiwavelength view exposes hundreds of relatively newly discovered stars in cluster NGC 2237 (center top). Nevertheless, these young stars (just a few million years old) are normally hidden in visible light images by the natal cloud’s gas and obscuring dust, which highlights the relevance of X-ray observations in astronomy. The presence of several X-ray emitting stars around the pillars and the detection of an outflow originating from a dark area of the optical image indicates that star formation is continuing in NGC 2237. By combining Chandra's study results with earlier studies, the scientists conclude that the central cluster (NGC 2244) formed first, followed by the expansion of the nebula, which triggered the formation of the neighboring clusters, including NGC 2237.

Link to Chandra X-ray Observatory website’s photo album (X-ray star field data): https://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2010/rosette/

Links to scientific articles related to the study of rosette’s star-forming complex (about NGC 2237 and NGC 2244 more specifically):
https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1086/526406/pdf
https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1 ... 6/1/47/pdf
https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1 ... /1/474/pdf
https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1086/376692/pdf

Image credit:
-optical: Anil Monnier
-X-ray: Chandra

Time: October 2023

Location: Madrid, Spain

Bortle 8-9
Exposure time: 09h36
-32x360s in HA mapped to green (blue in the final image)
-32x360s in OIII mapped to blue (orange in the final image)
-32x360s in SII mapped to red (green/cyan the final image)

Color code: optical (blue, cyan, green, orange); X-ray (red)

Gear:
Main Camera: ZWO 294 MM
Telescope: Radian Raptor 61
Mount: SkyWatcher NEQ6 Pro
Filter Set: ZWO HA, OIII, SII
Filter Wheel: ZWO EFW
Guide camera: ASI 290 MM Mini

Software:
N.I.N.A, DSS, Photoshop

Anil Monnier
Last edited by bystander on Sat Oct 07, 2023 2:11 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Please no hot links to images > 500 kb.

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Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by Anil Monnier » Fri Oct 06, 2023 4:25 pm

https://i.ibb.co/Zhz0YXb/with-watermark.jpg

https://i.ibb.co/yQBhbGn/cropped-with-watermark.jpg

Rosette’s Hidden Heart - Stars Beyond the Rosette: Rosette Nebula in SHO and star clusters by the Chandra X-ray Observatory:

Explanation: Visible light stars have been removed from this narrow-band image of the Rosette Nebula, a star-forming region some 5,200 light-years away toward the constellation Monoceros. Then, stars in X-ray data (in red) from the Chandra X-ray Observatory were digitally added back to the resulting starless image. This merged multiwavelength view exposes hundreds of relatively newly discovered stars in cluster NGC 2237 (center top). Nevertheless, these young stars (just a few million years old) are normally hidden in visible light images by the natal cloud’s gas and obscuring dust, which highlights the relevance of X-ray observations in astronomy. The presence of several X-ray emitting stars around the pillars and the detection of an outflow originating from a dark area of the optical image indicates that star formation is continuing in NGC 2237. By combining Chandra's study results with earlier studies, the scientists conclude that the central cluster (NGC 2244) formed first, followed by the expansion of the nebula, which triggered the formation of the neighboring clusters, including NGC 2237.

Link to Chandra X-ray Observatory website’s photo album (X-ray star field data): https://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2010/rosette/

Links to scientific articles related to the study of rosette’s star-forming complex (about NGC 2237 and NGC 2244 more specifically):
https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1086/526406/pdf
https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1 ... 6/1/47/pdf
https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1 ... /1/474/pdf
https://iopscience.iop.org/article/10.1086/376692/pdf

Image credit:
-optical: Anil Monnier
-X-ray: Chandra

Time: October 2023

Location: Madrid, Spain

Bortle 8-9
Exposure time: 09h36
-32x360s in HA mapped to green (blue in the final image)
-32x360s in OIII mapped to blue (orange in the final image)
-32x360s in SII mapped to red (green/cyan the final image)

Color code: optical (blue, cyan, green, orange); X-ray (red)

Gear:
Main Camera: ZWO 294 MM
Telescope: Radian Raptor 61
Mount: SkyWatcher NEQ6 Pro
Filter Set: ZWO HA, OIII, SII
Filter Wheel: ZWO EFW
Guide camera: ASI 290 MM Mini

Software:
N.I.N.A, DSS, Photoshop

Anil Monnier
Last edited by bystander on Sat Oct 07, 2023 2:13 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Please no hot links to images > 500 kb.

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Chris Peterson
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Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by Chris Peterson » Fri Oct 06, 2023 5:10 pm

Chris Alex wrote: Fri Oct 06, 2023 4:13 pm
Chris Peterson wrote: Fri Oct 06, 2023 12:47 am Evolution of a Supernova
Two images of SN 2023ixf in M101. The first is within a few days of peak intensity; the second from yesterday. 134 days of cooling off, from a hot, bright source to a cool, orange remnant. Orange because it has cooled down, and maybe because of dust scattering from a possible shell around the supernova.

Details:
QSI 660 camera on 250mm RC, Astronomic RGB filters
2023-05-23 image: 130 minutes each RGB
2023-10-04 image: 42 minutes each RGB
Processed with PixInsight and Photoshop
_
comp2_2k_a.jpg
Fascinating comparaison, I've been waiting to see this! Is there any clue in that remnant indicating whether we have a neutron star or a black hole?
Progenitor mass is estimated at 12-15 M⊙, so I think it could go either way. Haven't seen anything pointing solidly to either yet.
Chris

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Cloudbait Observatory
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Ann
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Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by Ann » Fri Oct 06, 2023 6:05 pm

Chris Peterson wrote: Fri Oct 06, 2023 3:05 pm
Ann wrote: Fri Oct 06, 2023 5:18 am
Chris Peterson wrote: Fri Oct 06, 2023 12:47 am Evolution of a Supernova
Two images of SN 2023ixf in M101. The first is within a few days of peak intensity; the second from yesterday. 134 days of cooling off, from a hot, bright source to a cool, orange remnant. Orange because it has cooled down, and maybe because of dust scattering from a possible shell around the supernova.

Details:
QSI 660 camera on 250mm RC, Astronomic RGB filters
2023-05-23 image: 130 minutes each RGB
2023-10-04 image: 42 minutes each RGB
Processed with PixInsight and Photoshop
_
Fascinating, Chris! Thanks!

It's interesting that the supernova is still bright enough to be still very clearly visible after more than six months. Of course, SN 2023ixf was a type SN II-L supernova, and they fade slowly:
Wikipedia wrote:
When the luminosity of a Type II supernova is plotted over a period of time, it shows a characteristic rise to a peak brightness followed by a decline. These light curves have an average decay rate of 0.008 magnitudes per day; much lower than the decay rate for Type Ia supernovae.
To me it is interesting that in your picture, the supernova looks very slightly yellow-white when it was near peak brightness. Other images show it as being very slightly bluish at peak brightness, which seems more resonable to me.

It is a well-established fact that supernovas grow progressively redder as they fade, so the orange color in the second picture seems spot on.

Ann
Yeah, can't really trust the color in the first image. The SN is so bright that it saturates, and since blue is brightest, it saturates first, which pushes the color away from blue. It might be an interesting exercise to figure out a way to keep both the color and the intensity in alignment with the rest of the image. That said, looking at the raw linear data, I can calculate the scaled RGB values as 147, 175, 255 = ███.

(Actually, type II-L supernovas fade fairly quickly; it is type II-P supernovas that persist longer. But this SN exhibited a short plateau phase, so its classification is a bit uncertain. I've seen it described in papers as a "hybrid II-P/II-L supernova".)
Interesting to know that a concentrated intensely bright bluish light source can look yellow-white precisely because it is so blue.

Thanks, Chris.

Ann
Color Commentator

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Elephant Trunk

Post by MrRat » Fri Oct 06, 2023 7:09 pm

IC1396 taken from my Bortle 4 backyard in Hartford, AL, USA. 170 shots at 300 seconds each taken with a ZWO ASI2600MC camera, William Optics GT81 telescope, and Losmandy GM811G equatorial mount. The last set of images were taken Oct. 4th, 2023.
231004 IC1396_Elephant_Trunk_170_300-crop-lpc-cbg-csc-St-1-Edit.jpg
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Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by isultan » Fri Oct 06, 2023 7:37 pm

Image
Orion's Dream

This is the dreamlike Orion constellation, featuring the Great Orion Nebula and Horsehead/Flame Nebulae, that I captured from Bortle Class 8-9 city skies in dual narrowband.

Night 1 (9/30/23): 17x300 sec
Night 2 (10/1/23): 21x300 sec
Night 3 (10/2/23): 20x300 sec

Equipment:
ZWO ASI533MC Pro
Samyang 135mm f/2 at f/2.8
Optolong L-Ultimate 2" filter
Star Adventurer GTi, ZWO 30mm f/4 guidescope, ASI120MM Mini guidecamera, ASIAIR Pro

Processing:
Astro Pixel Processor, PixInsight (incl. BlurXTerminator, NoiseXTerminator, Bill Blanshan Narrowband Normalization scripts), StarNet v2, Adobe Photoshop

Location: Des Plaines, Illinois
Dates: 9/30-10/2 2023
Copyright: Imran Sultan

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Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by astrohokie » Sun Oct 08, 2023 2:29 pm

Crescent Nebula HOO

"The Crescent Nebula (also known as NGC 6888, Caldwell 27, Sharpless 105) is an emission nebula in the constellation Cygnus, about 5000 light-years away from Earth. It was discovered by William Herschel in 1792. It is formed by the fast stellar wind from the Wolf-Rayet star WR 136 (HD 192163) colliding with and energizing the slower moving wind ejected by the star when it became a red giant around 250,000 to 400,000 years ago. The result of the collision is a shell and two shock waves, one moving outward and one moving inward. The inward moving shock wave heats the stellar wind to X-ray-emitting temperatures"

https://www.flickr.com/photos/194543639@N07/
https://www.instagram.com/mark_hoffman_photography/

Copyright: Mark Hoffman

Image by mark h, on Flickr

Starless Image:
Image by mark h, on Flickr

Equipment/Capture Details:
Celestron Edge HD8 w/ 0.7x reducer
EQ6R-Pro
Celestron Autofocuser
ZWO ASI 174MM
ASI 294MM Pro
ASI 7 position EFW
1.25in Chroma 5nm Ha, 3nm O3, Red, Green, Blue filters
Total Integration Time = 30 hours
Ha Integration Time = 90 * 600sec
O3 Integration Time = 91 * 600sec
RGB stars Integration Time = 30 * 60sec
Virginia, USA
Bortle 7

Software:
Pixinsight, Adobe Photoshop
Last edited by astrohokie on Mon Oct 09, 2023 3:09 am, edited 1 time in total.

astrohokie
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Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by astrohokie » Sun Oct 08, 2023 2:53 pm

Western Veil HOO

Western Veil (Pickering's Triangle and Witch's Broom)

"The Veil Nebula is a cloud of heated and ionized gas and dust in the constellation Cygnus. It constitutes the visible portions of the Cygnus Loop, a supernova remnant, many portions of which have acquired their own individual names and catalogue identifiers. The source supernova was a star 20 times more massive than the Sun which exploded between 10,000 and 20,000 years ago. At the time of the explosion, the supernova would have appeared brighter than Venus in the sky, and visible in the daytime. The remnants have since expanded to cover an area of the sky roughly 3 degrees in diameter (about 6 times the diameter, and 36 times the area, of the full Moon). While previous distance estimates have ranged from 1200 to 5800 light-years, a recent determination of 2400 light-years is based on direct astrometric measurements."

https://www.flickr.com/photos/194543639@N07/
https://www.instagram.com/mark_hoffman_photography/

Copyright: Mark Hoffman

Image by mark h, on Flickr

Equipment/Capture Details:
Williams Optics Z73
EQ35-Pro
ZWO ASI EAF
ZWO ASI 120MM
ZWO ASI 1600MM Pro
ZWO ASI 7 position EFW
Kendrick Dew Heater
Pegasus Pocket Powerbox Mini
36mm Astronomik 6nm Ha, O3, RGB filters
Total Integration Time = 28 hours
Ha Integration Time = 121 * 480sec
O3 Integration Time = 186 * 240sec
RGB Integration Time = 30 * 30sec
USA
Bortle 7

Software:
Pixinsight, Adobe Photoshop

maxmarchini
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Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by maxmarchini » Sun Oct 08, 2023 3:24 pm

The Soap Bubble Nebula was discovered only in 2008 by an American amateur astronomer, Dave Jurasevich, who noticed it in a photo of the Crescent Nebula. It is a sphere of gas expelled by a dying star, which lights up thanks to the ultraviolet radiation of the same star. It is estimated to be about 5000 light years away from us and to have a diameter of about 6 light years.
The Soap Bubble Nebula is so faint that it escaped all professional terrestrial and space telescopes, such as Hubble or Chandra. Only in 2016, it was captured for the first time by the Spitzer space telescope, which operates in the infrared. This image shows the nebula in a reddish hue, different from the green-blue that is seen in amateur photos.

ImageSoap Bubble Nebula - 202309 starless by Massimo Marchini, su Flickr

ImageSoap Bubble Nebula - 202309 HOO by Massimo Marchini, su Flickr

https://www.flickr.com/gp/madmax1616/8630p61PaC
https://www.flickr.com/gp/madmax1616/Y615bu5886

Copuright: Massimo Marchini

Equipment/Capture Detail
Tecnosky AG70
Rainbow Astro RST135
ZWO ASIAir Plus
ZWO ASI2600MM
This Image is a crop on a wide field visible here https://flic.kr/p/2p5S7Eq
2" RGB Astronomik and 2" 3nm Ha, OII, SII Antlia Filters
11h45m integration
Ha=3h00'
OII=2h50'
SII=3h00'
R=1h00'
G=1h00'
B=54'

Italy

behyar
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Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by behyar » Sun Oct 08, 2023 8:58 pm

Hole in the Sky

Fallstreak hole and Sunset Oct 7, 2023.

Copyright: Behyar Bakhshandeh, Carlsbad, CA
http://www.deepskyobjects.com/
Last edited by behyar on Sun Oct 08, 2023 11:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.

kwalker
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Location: New Mexico

Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by kwalker » Sun Oct 08, 2023 9:00 pm

Image


LDN 935 The Gulf of Mexico Nebula
Dark Nebula located within NGC 7000
The Gaia Astrometry spacecraft using 395 stars within the region estimates this area to be 2590 Lys from earth.
Chroma 5nm filters
12hours and 20 minutes of data
6x300 each RGB channels
28x600 Ha
18x600 SII
19x600 OIII
Stellarvue SVX130T-R
SFFX1 on the Stellarvue focuser
MallinCam SkyRaider DS26m TEC
Paramount MYT
SG-Pro
PixInsight
Ken Walker

zombi
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Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by zombi » Sun Oct 08, 2023 9:26 pm

Prawn Nebula / IC4628


Image
Prawn Nebula / IC4628 by .zombi., on Flickr

Imaging telescopes: Takahashi FSQ-106EDXIII
Imaging cameras: Moravian G3-16200EC
Accessories: Reducer-QE 0.73X
Mounts: ZWO AM5
Software: N.I.N.A. · PixInsight · Adobe Photoshop

Frames:
Baader S-II 8nm 50 mm: 2×600″(20′)
SVBony H-alpha 7nm 2": 2×600″(20′)
Baader O-III 8.5nm 50 mm: 2×600″(20′)

Photographic technique: SHO

Integration: 1h
Bortle Dark-Sky Scale: 1/2

Location: RPA - Blesfontein Guest Farm
Dates: April 25, 2023

Description:
Picture taken in April during an astrophotography safari in South Africa.

Image Credit & Copyright: Przemysław Ząbczyk

Links:
http://www.astrobin.com/users/zombi/
https://www.astropolis.pl/tags/zombi/

AlexandreCroisier
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Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by AlexandreCroisier » Mon Oct 09, 2023 9:13 am

Hi there,

I've captured last week the full moon rising above one of the best place in France : Mont Saint-Michel.

The timing was short, but it was a fantastic moment I wanted to share with you.
I put my tripod with a 600mm lens at 11km from the Mont Saint-Michel to have this scale between the monument and the moon.
It was on september the 30, at 20:19.
Due to the quality of my lens and the atmospheric diffraction, the image is not particular sharp, but it is not the mos important

Exif.
France, Bretagne/Normandie, Mont Saint-Michel
Canon EOS R, 1/6s, f6.3, 4000 iso @600mm

Have a nice day !

Alexandre Croisier
Instagram : http://www.instagram.com/alexandrecroisier/‌
FB : https://www.facebook.com/photo/?fbid=80 ... 2207520000

Image

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Chris Peterson
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Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by Chris Peterson » Mon Oct 09, 2023 5:15 pm

Deep Cocoon
IC5146, the Cocoon Nebula. So far I have almost 17 hours of light, and it's really bringing out the complex emission and reflection components, as well as dust.

Details:
QSI 660 camera on 250mm RC, Astronomic RGB filters
5:51 hours red, 5:38 hours green, 5:08 hours blue
Processed with PixInsight and Photoshop
Final image resolution 0.64 arcsec/pixel, 21 arcminute wide field
_
IC5146_17h_2k_clp.jpg
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Chris

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Cloudbait Observatory
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pineta1984
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Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by pineta1984 » Mon Oct 09, 2023 5:29 pm

IC1340 Nebula - Authors: Alex Battù and Luca Barcaro

In the constellation Cygnus, definitely the most dominant one in the summer/autumn sky, about 2400 light years from us, there is a large and bright nebula.
It has a diameter of 110 light years and covers a very large area in the sky. In this photo, rope-like shards of gas intertwine and glow as fast-moving debris from the supernova explosion rushes into the surrounding area, creating large shock waves. Only the most massive stars end their lives as a supernova, and these explosions are responsible for the creation of all naturally occurring chemical elements.
Capture details:
Tecnosky Fast 300mm, f/3,4
ASI 6200m
Chromatechnology HSO filters
Sii: 35x900''
Ha: 24*900''
Oiii: 32*900''
Total exposure time: 22,8h
Location: Catillejar (Spain)
Granada Unesco Global Geopark

ImageIC1340 by Astro Divers, su Flickr

jlndfr
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Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by jlndfr » Mon Oct 09, 2023 10:25 pm

Dark sky matters
https://cdn.astrobin.com/thumbs/1qEgkVT ... TZ0INm.jpg

24 minutes of integration for this image taken under a beautiful Bortle 3 sky in France (Samyang 135 / 6D).
I thought I had accumulated 3 hours of integration but when you leave the ISO at 100 it doesn’t work that well.
I realized it the last half hour the last night. Of course.

But in the end, the quality of the sky and the brightness of Orion allowed me to produce a correct image.
The stars treatment was quite difficult, stars are still very distorted at f/2.8 on a full frame.

Full image here
Last edited by bystander on Tue Oct 10, 2023 12:30 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Please no hot links to images > 500 kb. Used smaller image.

Tom Glenn
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Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by Tom Glenn » Tue Oct 10, 2023 5:24 am

Sunset at the South Pole
ImageSunset at the South Pole by Tom Glenn, on Flickr

I captured this image last Friday at dawn from San Diego. The image shows the southern limb of the Moon with long shadows cast near the sunset terminator. The South Pole is near the top left of the image, and this region is the planned destination for upcoming lunar missions that will once again land humans on the Moon. Many prominent craters are featured throughout the image, including Tycho and Clavius. Slightly above and to the left of Clavius in this image is the crater Moretus, with its central peak casting a long shadow that resembles a sundial. Moretus is over 5km deep from rim to floor.

Image details:
October 6, 2023, 13:15 UTC
San Diego, CA (06:15 PDT)
C9.25 Edge HD telescope
ASI678mc camera
100 frames stacked

maphilli14
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Posts: 33
Joined: Tue May 08, 2012 2:32 am

Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by maphilli14 » Tue Oct 10, 2023 5:40 pm

Jupiter's Moon Io caught spying on the Great Red Spot
https://astromikephillips.wixsite.com/home
Copyright: Michael A. Phillips
Animation - https://youtu.be/NsXcI9QVpFc

Kanak Bhuwalka

Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by Kanak Bhuwalka » Tue Oct 10, 2023 8:28 pm

Hello, I am a 15 year old astrophotographer, and still in the beginging fases. This is my image of Jupiter, its Great Red Spot, Io, and Europa and I am super proud of it. I wanted to see if I have a chance of making it for the APOD.
Image details:
Copyright: Kanak Bhuwalka
Jupiter
Taken with a 4 in refractor telescope with a eq-3 untracked mount, zwo asi 120mc-s and 3x Barlow (3000mm of FL)
Processed with PIPP, AS3, Registax6 and GIMP.
The moons that are visible are Io and Europa
35 frames visible best 50% used.
Taken on 6 October 2023 from Belgium.
Thanks and clear skies!

Bobinius
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Posts: 45
Joined: Thu Nov 14, 2019 12:18 am

Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by Bobinius » Tue Oct 10, 2023 9:26 pm

Penguin Ad Astra : Barnard 175, vdB 152

Copyright: Bogdan Borz

This region in Cepheus is very rich in interesting objects, from a dark nebula, Bok globules, reflection nebula to a Herbig Haro object. And also a planetary nebula plus a supernova remnant. vdB 152 is the blue reflection nebula on top of a Bok globule, the Herbig Haro object can be seen below the beak of the penguin. The SNR is faintly seen as red filaments on the right (I did not use Ha) and the planetary nebula is on the lower right. The nebula gives me the impression of seeing a penguin flying towards the stars.

Telescope: ONTC 250mm f3.8
Camera: ASI 2600MM @ - 10°C
Filters: Baader LRGB 36mm
Mount: Skywatcher AZEQ6 R Pro
Location: Personal remote observatory, e-Eye Extremadura, Spain
Dates: July 18-28 2023
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Richardwhitehead
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Posts: 13
Joined: Thu Feb 11, 2021 4:37 am

Re: Submissions: 2023 October

Post by Richardwhitehead » Wed Oct 11, 2023 4:55 am

This is a widefield view of the Crescent Nebula (NGC6888) and the surrounding wonderful area of Cygnus Nebulosity and the very faint "Soap Bubble" nebula seen just below it.
The Crescent Nebula is the nebulosity caused by gas shells being ejected from the massively hot central star, Wolf-Rayet star WR 136. There are two shells here, one still expanding, and one bouncing back off the outer shell that is incoming. Very conveniently, they have very different ionized gas profiles and therefore in a narrowband image such as this, show as very different colors.
The shell still expanding glowing in the light of triple-ionized Oxygen ( Blue/green) and the incoming rebound shell in the glow of red ionized Hydrogen.
As you can see the entire background is awash with Hydrogen glow and is one of my favorite areas of the sky, looking like it's on fire.
The soap bubble nebula was unknown until 1973, and is a planetary nebula.
NGC 6888 is about 25 lights years across, and 5000 light years from earth, WR136 has a luminosity or 260,000 x that of our sun!
Tech stuff
Location : my garden, St. George , VT, USA
Scope : Takahashi FSQ-106 EDX4
Mount : A-P 110 GTO-AE
Eagle 4 pro Computer
Images 15 x 5 mins Ha Chroma 3nm, 15 x 10 mins OIII Chroma 3nm
(Shot SII , but not worth including)
Modified HOO image
processed entirely in Pixinsight
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