Webb Telescope - Merger of black holes 740 million years after the Big Bang

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Psnarf
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Webb Telescope - Merger of black holes 740 million years after the Big Bang

Post by Psnarf » Thu May 16, 2024 4:26 pm

https://hosted.ap.org/article/cd5a78e8d ... lack-holes

Black holes originated before galaxies.

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Re: Webb Telescope - Merger of black holes 740 million years after the Big Bang

Post by AVAO » Fri May 17, 2024 4:18 am

Psnarf wrote: Thu May 16, 2024 4:26 pm https://hosted.ap.org/article/cd5a78e8d ... lack-holes

Black holes originated before galaxies.

Thanks Psnarf 4 the interesting Link!
Maybe there are more people who would like to join in the discussion.


livescience.com:
"Astronomers have used the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to detect the most distant pair of colliding black holes in the known universe. The cosmic monsters — each estimated to be as massive as 50 million suns — have been detected more than 13 billion light-years away, at a time just 740 million years after the Big Bang.
While not the biggest or oldest black holes ever detected, the merging pair have still managed to grow bafflingly large for such an early time in the universe's history, the study authors said in a European Space Agency (ESA) statement. This discovery further challenges leading theories of cosmology, which fail to explain how objects in the universe's infancy could grow so large, so fast.
https://www.livescience.com/space/black ... e-universe
Last edited by AVAO on Fri May 17, 2024 2:14 pm, edited 4 times in total.

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Re: Webb Telescope - Merger of black holes 740 million years after the Big Bang

Post by AVAO » Fri May 17, 2024 5:00 am

Psnarf wrote: Thu May 16, 2024 4:26 pm https://hosted.ap.org/article/cd5a78e8d ... lack-holes

Black holes originated before galaxies.

There are also more exciting things to see in this area of the sky that challenge our current understanding .-)


But where is the lens?
I like cannonball pulsars but also cannonball galaxies,-) jac berne (flickr) Image rotated 90 degrees

Original data: NASA/ESA/CSA (JWST)
Last edited by AVAO on Fri May 17, 2024 8:02 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Ann
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Re: Webb Telescope - Merger of black holes 740 million years after the Big Bang

Post by Ann » Fri May 17, 2024 5:54 pm

AVAO wrote: Fri May 17, 2024 5:00 am
Psnarf wrote: Thu May 16, 2024 4:26 pm https://hosted.ap.org/article/cd5a78e8d ... lack-holes

Black holes originated before galaxies.

There are also more exciting things to see in this area of the sky that challenge our current understanding .-)


But where is the lens?
I like cannonball pulsars but also cannonball galaxies,-) jac berne (flickr) Image rotated 90 degrees

Original data: NASA/ESA/CSA (JWST)

This system is pretty crazy:

Strange early galaxy by JWST in May 2024.png

Is the strange (starforming?) galactic arm a tidal feature? If so, something is tugging at this galaxy - what? The massive object distorting the galaxy must be off to the left.

And really, what is that orange hamburger-like object to the lower right of the tidally distorted galaxy's bulge or lens?The orange stuff is so different in both color and texture from the smooth bluish-beige center of the distorted foreground galaxy that the textured orange object can't be part of the grayish galaxy. So it must be a lensed object? Unless we are talking about overlapping galaxies at different distances from one another?


Ah, but I don't believe that the orange object at lower right behind the gray galaxy is just a background galaxy seen along our line of sight. It looks really squished, and if it is, it must be a lensed object.

Note at upper right an elegant orange-colored spiral galaxy where, admittedly, something strange is going on immediately to the upper right of it. What is that thing? However, if the disregard the strangeness to the upper right of the upper right orange spiral galaxy, then the orange stuff to the lower right of the gray galaxy does look like a lensed version of the orange galaxy at upper right. Note that the squished object behind the gray galaxy appears to be exactly the same size as the orange galaxy at upper right (minus the weirdness to its own upper right). Note, too, that the two orange objects, one behind the gray galaxy and one at upper right, are exactly the same color and seem to be textured in exactly the same way.

As for the other galaxy, it sure looks like a racetrack for car racing!

Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Amazing! :shock: :D

Ann
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Re: Webb Telescope - Merger of black holes 740 million years after the Big Bang

Post by AVAO » Fri May 17, 2024 8:41 pm

Ann wrote: Fri May 17, 2024 5:54 pm
This system is pretty crazy:
Strange early galaxy by JWST in May 2024.png

Is the strange (starforming?) galactic arm a tidal feature? If so, something is tugging at this galaxy - what? The massive object distorting the galaxy must be off to the left.

And really, what is that orange hamburger-like object to the lower right of the tidally distorted galaxy's bulge or lens?The orange stuff is so different in both color and texture from the smooth bluish-beige center of the distorted foreground galaxy that the textured orange object can't be part of the grayish galaxy. So it must be a lensed object? Unless we are talking about overlapping galaxies at different distances from one another?
Ah, but I don't believe that the orange object at lower right behind the gray galaxy is just a background galaxy seen along our line of sight. It looks really squished, and if it is, it must be a lensed object.

Note at upper right an elegant orange-colored spiral galaxy where, admittedly, something strange is going on immediately to the upper right of it. What is that thing? However, if the disregard the strangeness to the upper right of the upper right orange spiral galaxy, then the orange stuff to the lower right of the gray galaxy does look like a lensed version of the orange galaxy at upper right. Note that the squished object behind the gray galaxy appears to be exactly the same size as the orange galaxy at upper right (minus the weirdness to its own upper right). Note, too, that the two orange objects, one behind the gray galaxy and one at upper right, are exactly the same color and seem to be textured in exactly the same way.

As for the other galaxy, it sure looks like a racetrack for car racing!
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Amazing! :shock: :D

Ann

ThanX Ann

Unfortunately, I have to say, that one of the Photoshop layers had shifted slightly during editing.
Such mistakes very, very rarely happens to me. So the correct image only has one red galaxy.
However, the galaxy depicted with a long cantilevered arm still remains a mystery.


But that's just one of those things when you see everything twice everywhere ;-)

SDSS J115331 and LEDA 2073461 jac berne (flickr)

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Re: Webb Telescope - Merger of black holes 740 million years after the Big Bang

Post by Ann » Sat May 18, 2024 6:19 am

AVAO wrote: Fri May 17, 2024 8:41 pm
Ann wrote: Fri May 17, 2024 5:54 pm
This system is pretty crazy:
Strange early galaxy by JWST in May 2024.png

Is the strange (starforming?) galactic arm a tidal feature? If so, something is tugging at this galaxy - what? The massive object distorting the galaxy must be off to the left.

And really, what is that orange hamburger-like object to the lower right of the tidally distorted galaxy's bulge or lens?The orange stuff is so different in both color and texture from the smooth bluish-beige center of the distorted foreground galaxy that the textured orange object can't be part of the grayish galaxy. So it must be a lensed object? Unless we are talking about overlapping galaxies at different distances from one another?
Ah, but I don't believe that the orange object at lower right behind the gray galaxy is just a background galaxy seen along our line of sight. It looks really squished, and if it is, it must be a lensed object.

Note at upper right an elegant orange-colored spiral galaxy where, admittedly, something strange is going on immediately to the upper right of it. What is that thing? However, if the disregard the strangeness to the upper right of the upper right orange spiral galaxy, then the orange stuff to the lower right of the gray galaxy does look like a lensed version of the orange galaxy at upper right. Note that the squished object behind the gray galaxy appears to be exactly the same size as the orange galaxy at upper right (minus the weirdness to its own upper right). Note, too, that the two orange objects, one behind the gray galaxy and one at upper right, are exactly the same color and seem to be textured in exactly the same way.

As for the other galaxy, it sure looks like a racetrack for car racing!
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Amazing!

Ann

ThanX Ann

Unfortunately, I have to say, that one of the Photoshop layers had shifted slightly during editing.
Such mistakes very, very rarely happens to me. So the correct image only has one red galaxy.
However, the galaxy depicted with a long cantilevered arm still remains a mystery.


But that's just one of those things when you see everything twice everywhere ;-)

SDSS J115331 and LEDA 2073461 jac berne (flickr)

Is that a second pair of overlapping galaxies at upper right??? :o :lol2:

Ann
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Re: Webb Telescope - Merger of black holes 740 million years after the Big Bang

Post by AVAO » Sat May 18, 2024 4:29 pm

Ann wrote: Sat May 18, 2024 6:19 am
But that's just one of those things when you see everything twice everywhere ;-)
SDSS J115331 and LEDA 2073461 jac berne (flickr)

Is that a second pair of overlapping galaxies at upper right??? :o

Ann

Well. I think that often coincidence does not derive from random but from falling to ;-)

Source: https://www.astronomy.com/science/hoags-object