Supernova Remnant N132D

Comments and questions about the APOD on the main view screen.
dlw
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Supernova Remnant N132D

Post by dlw » Tue Oct 25, 2005 4:18 pm

I am intrigued by the statement in the Oct 25 APOD:

"The expanding shell from this explosion now spans 80 light-years and has swept up about 600 Suns worth of mass."

How is this "swept up mass" estimated? Is there perhaps a deceleration of the ejected matter that can be observed?

Is this "swept up mass" related to so-called dark matter? If so, does this provide a way to estimate the density of dark matter, at least in certain regions?

Just curious.

Storm_norm
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Re: Supernova Remnant N132D

Post by Storm_norm » Wed Oct 26, 2005 12:10 am

dlw wrote:I am intrigued by the statement in the Oct 25 APOD:

"The expanding shell from this explosion now spans 80 light-years and has swept up about 600 Suns worth of mass."

How is this "swept up mass" estimated? Is there perhaps a deceleration of the ejected matter that can be observed?

Is this "swept up mass" related to so-called dark matter? If so, does this provide a way to estimate the density of dark matter, at least in certain regions?

Just curious.

just at a glance, I would think it means that it picked up all that dust along the way, and that dust (visible or invisible) just adds up to all that mass. I think the question is: is that matter flowing along with the wave??? if so, how much matter can it pick up and move and for how long?

S. Bilderback
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Post by S. Bilderback » Wed Oct 26, 2005 12:11 am

The 600 solar masses is the amount of mass contained in the expanding shell from both the material ejected from the nova and the other nebula gasses that were displaced from the shock wave. Dark matter isn't an issue here.

sylvester
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Supernova Remnant N132D - 25 October 2005

Post by sylvester » Wed Oct 26, 2005 8:19 pm

Very near the top right hand corner, almost on the diagonal, is a comet-like streak.

What could this be?

S. Bilderback
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Post by S. Bilderback » Wed Oct 26, 2005 9:12 pm

Is it the small hook above the 2 vertical yellow stars just to the left to the bright yellow star?

DianneManning
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Nova-Supernova-Hypernova?

Post by DianneManning » Wed Oct 26, 2005 9:55 pm

It seems in my memory that when I was a young woman in college, we learned that a star explosion was called a "Nova," and that a few really large ones were named "Supernovae." But now I seem never to hear of a simple Nova. Instead, everything seems to be a Supernova, and there is talk of even a Hypernova from time to time. Has the term "Nova" been relegated to history?
- Dianne

S. Bilderback
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Post by S. Bilderback » Thu Oct 27, 2005 1:11 am

The terns are sometime misused, or the term nova is used as a general word for all nova types.

Nova: exploding star producing a dwarf of various types
Super Nova: creates a neutron star
Hyper nova: creates a black hole

S. Bilderback
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Re: Supernova Remnant N132D - 25 October 2005

Post by S. Bilderback » Tue Nov 01, 2005 12:47 pm

sylvester wrote:Very near the top right hand corner, almost on the diagonal, is a comet-like streak.

What could this be?
http://www1.nasa.gov/images/content/137 ... s_full.jpg

This might explain what it is.

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orin stepanek
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Post by orin stepanek » Tue Nov 01, 2005 2:13 pm

80 light years would most likely reach other star systems. Would these remnant gasses affect other worlds; or would they be too rarefied to be an effect???
Orin

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Re: Supernova Remnant N132D - 25 October 2005

Post by crosscountry » Tue Nov 01, 2005 3:04 pm

S. Bilderback wrote:
sylvester wrote:Very near the top right hand corner, almost on the diagonal, is a comet-like streak.

What could this be?
http://www1.nasa.gov/images/content/137 ... s_full.jpg

This might explain what it is.


there is too much blue in that picture.

S. Bilderback
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Post by S. Bilderback » Wed Nov 02, 2005 2:33 am

It would be no different than our solar system; the Suns heliosphere protects us via the solar winds.