APOD: Colorful Clouds Near Rho Ophiuchi (2012 Aug 28)

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APOD: Colorful Clouds Near Rho Ophiuchi (2012 Aug 28)

Postby APOD Robot » Tue Aug 28, 2012 4:06 am

Image Colorful Clouds Near Rho Ophiuchi

Explanation: Why is the sky near Antares and Rho Ophiuchi so colorful? The colors result from a mixture of objects and processes. Fine dust illuminated from the front by starlight produces blue reflection nebulae. Gaseous clouds whose atoms are excited by ultraviolet starlight produce reddish emission nebulae. Backlit dust clouds block starlight and so appear dark. Antares, a red supergiant and one of the brighter stars in the night sky, lights up the yellow-red clouds on the lower center. Rho Ophiuchi lies at the center of the blue nebula near the top. The distant globular cluster M4 is visible just to the right of Antares, and to the lower left of the red cloud engulfing Sigma Scorpii. These star clouds are even more colorful than humans can see, emitting light across the electromagnetic spectrum.

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Re: APOD: Colorful Clouds Near Rho Ophiuchi (2012 Aug 28)

Postby Ann » Tue Aug 28, 2012 4:36 am

Row, rho, row your boat
gently down the Pipe Dream Stream!
In a sea of blue.

This is a nice APOD. :ssmile:

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Re: APOD: Colorful Clouds Near Rho Ophiuchi (2012 Aug 28)

Postby nstahl » Tue Aug 28, 2012 9:22 am

A great APOD. Nice picture and a lot of science.

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Re: APOD: Colorful Clouds Near Rho Ophiuchi (2012 Aug 28)

Postby smitty » Tue Aug 28, 2012 12:01 pm

And what about the amazingly dense and seemingly homogeneous background field of what I assume must be stars and/or galaxies? Is that part of any named star field or other named celestial wonder? Are we looking toward the center of the Milky Way? Not all sky images appear to have this sort of dense star field background.

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Re: APOD: Colorful Clouds Near Rho Ophiuchi (2012 Aug 28)

Postby orin stepanek » Tue Aug 28, 2012 12:18 pm

Gonna make a very colorful background! 8-) :D :clap: :clap: :thumb_up: :thumb_up:
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Re: APOD: Colorful Clouds Near Rho Ophiuchi (2012 Aug 28)

Postby Ann » Tue Aug 28, 2012 2:01 pm

smitty wrote:And what about the amazingly dense and seemingly homogeneous background field of what I assume must be stars and/or galaxies? Is that part of any named star field or other named celestial wonder? Are we looking toward the center of the Milky Way? Not all sky images appear to have this sort of dense star field background.


Check out this picture by Richard Payne. You can see the Milky Way, including the visually brightest part of it at center left. You can see Antares (the bright orange star) and the Rho Ophiuchi complex (the bluish star to the upper right of Antares) at three o'clock. As you can see, the Antares and Rho Ophiuchi region is "above" the densest part of the bulge of the Milky Way. Nevertheless, the stars you see in the background in today's APOD likely belong to the bulge of the Milky Way.

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Re: APOD: Colorful Clouds Near Rho Ophiuchi (2012 Aug 28)

Postby Chris Peterson » Tue Aug 28, 2012 2:49 pm

smitty wrote:And what about the amazingly dense and seemingly homogeneous background field of what I assume must be stars and/or galaxies? Is that part of any named star field or other named celestial wonder? Are we looking toward the center of the Milky Way? Not all sky images appear to have this sort of dense star field background.

We're looking almost into the center of our galaxy. That star field does have a name: the Milky Way! This is right in its densest region. What looks like a gray fog to our eyes resolves to thousands of stars in a telescopic view.
Chris

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Re: APOD: Colorful Clouds Near Rho Ophiuchi (2012 Aug 28)

Postby RCN Retired » Tue Aug 28, 2012 4:30 pm

I just signed this site and interesting that this is the first thread I read. This picture shows exactly what a current scientific report I read this past week described. It stated that each and every galaxy has a black hole at the very center. Some of these holes are not active, and the Milky way has one of these types. A black hole that is active sucks in everything within its reach, growing larger and larger by absorbing energy and gravity. Eventually the neutrons and protons deep inside interact with an unknown element and the black hole implodes. This "Big Bang" spews debris millions of lights years in every direction. This debris in time loses speed and the objects become attracted to each other due to gravity. The small pieces of course being controlled by the larger ones. Each of these groups become a galaxy itself.

At the center of course forms a small black hole, which devours what is closest to it, but not powerful enough to draw very far in space terms, but still strong enough to keep the new formed planets with their moons from drifting off. Every planets gravity effects others and keeps their orbits fairly constant. The study found in deep space that the fog or mist like appearance that shows in the center of a Galaxy is a mass of planets attracted the most by a black hole with help from other larger planets. This is what is going on in our Milky way they say. The scientists state that our Milky Way is safe from it's black hole for thousands of light years yet.

The report covers a lot more than I have here and it opens up numerous lines of thought. They are looking far beyond the Milky Way for answers to questions about our home base.

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Re: APOD: Colorful Clouds Near Rho Ophiuchi (2012 Aug 28)

Postby Chris Peterson » Tue Aug 28, 2012 4:54 pm

RCN Retired wrote:I just signed this site and interesting that this is the first thread I read. This picture shows exactly what a current scientific report I read this past week described. It stated that each and every galaxy has a black hole at the very center. Some of these holes are not active, and the Milky way has one of these types. A black hole that is active sucks in everything within its reach, growing larger and larger by absorbing energy and gravity.

That is mostly true. Black holes don't really suck things in the way most people imagine. Stuff orbits them just like it would orbit any body with mass. An active black hole is one that has enough dust and gas around it that orbital energy is lost through collisions, and as a result material spirals into the black hole- releasing a lot of energy in the process. An inactive black hole simply doesn't have enough stuff around it to cause orbiting bodies to lose energy, so they continue to orbit. The central black holes found in most galaxies probably go through cyclic periods of activity and inactivity, as their environments change.

Eventually the neutrons and protons deep inside interact with an unknown element and the black hole implodes. This "Big Bang" spews debris millions of lights years in every direction. This debris in time loses speed and the objects become attracted to each other due to gravity. The small pieces of course being controlled by the larger ones. Each of these groups become a galaxy itself.

This is not how black holes behave, and does not describe current ideas on how galaxies form.

The study found in deep space that the fog or mist like appearance that shows in the center of a Galaxy is a mass of planets attracted the most by a black hole with help from other larger planets. This is what is going on in our Milky way they say.

We can observe dozens of stars rapidly orbiting the central black hole of the Milky Way. No planets, though.
Chris

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Re: APOD: Colorful Clouds Near Rho Ophiuchi (2012 Aug 28)

Postby FloridaMike » Tue Aug 28, 2012 7:25 pm

RCN Retired wrote:I just signed this site and interesting that this is the first thread I read...


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Re: APOD: Colorful Clouds Near Rho Ophiuchi (2012 Aug 28)

Postby emc » Tue Aug 28, 2012 8:14 pm

nephelococcygia

Image

Not the exact angle in today's APOD... but I imagine a blue haired torso complete with eyes and screaming teeth. Kind of Dali-ish.

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Tasteful Clouds Near Rho Ophiuchi

Postby neufer » Wed Aug 29, 2012 2:11 pm

http://www.space.com/17345-sugar-molecu ... -star.html wrote:
Space Sugar Discovered Around Sun-Like Star
by SPACE.com Staff: 29 August 2012 Time: 06:01 AM ET

Molecules of simple sugar, known as glycolaldehyde,
were found around a young, sun-like star.

<<What a sweet cosmic find! Sugar molecules have been found in the gas surrounding a young sun-like star, suggesting that some of the building blocks of life may actually be present even as alien planets are still forming in the system.

The young star, called IRAS 16293-2422, is part of a binary (or two-star) system. It has a similar mass to the sun and is located about 400 light-years away in the constellation of Ophiuchus. The sugar molecules, known as glycolaldehyde, have previously been detected in interstellar space, but according to the researchers, this is the first time they have been spotted so close to a sun-like star.

In fact, the molecules are about the same distance away from the star as the planet Uranus is from our sun.

"In the disk of gas and dust surrounding this newly formed star, we found glycolaldehyde (C2H4O2), which is a simple form of sugar, not much different to the sugar we put in coffee," study lead author Jes Jørgensen, of the Niels Bohr Institute in Denmark, said in a statement. "This molecule is one of the ingredients in the formation of RNA, which — like DNA, to which it is related — is one of the building blocks of life." Glycolaldehyde can react with a substance called propenal to form ribose, which is a major component of RNA, or ribonucleic acid. RNA is similar to DNA, which is considered one of the primary molecules in the origin of life.

Astronomers found the sugar molecules using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) radio telescope in Chile. Using ALMA, the astronomers monitored the sugar molecules and found that they are falling toward one of the stars in the binary system, explained study researcher Cécile Favre, of Aarhus University in Denmark. "The sugar molecules are not only in the right place to find their way onto a planet, but they are also going in the right direction," Favre said in a statement.

When new stars are formed, the clouds of dust and gas from which they are born are extremely cold. Much of the gas turns into ice on the dust particles, bonding together and becoming complex molecules, the researchers said. As the newborn star develops, it heats up the inner parts of the rotating cloud of gas and dust, warming it to about room temperature, the scientists explained. This heating process evaporates the chemically complex molecules and forms gases that emit radiation that can be picked up by sensitive radio telescopes.

"A big question is: how complex can these molecules become before they are incorporated into new planets?" Jørgensen said. "This could tell us something about how life might arise elsewhere, and ALMA observations are going to be vital to unravel this mystery."

Since IRAS 16293-2422 is located relatively close to Earth, scientists will be able to study the molecular and chemical makeup of the gas and dust around the young star. Powerful instruments, including ALMA, will also help researchers see the interactions of these molecules as new alien planets form. The detailed results of the study will be published in an upcoming issue of the Astrophysical Journal Letters.>>
Art Neuendorffer


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