APOD: Apollo 17: A Stereo View from Lunar... (2012 Dec 13)

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APOD: Apollo 17: A Stereo View from Lunar... (2012 Dec 13)

Post by APOD Robot » Thu Dec 13, 2012 5:05 am

Image Apollo 17: A Stereo View from Lunar Orbit

Explanation: Get out your red/blue glasses and check out this awesome stereo view of another world. The scene was recorded by Apollo 17 mission commander Eugene Cernan on December 11, 1972, one orbit before descending to land on the Moon. The stereo anaglyph was assembled from two photographs (AS17-147-22465, AS17-147-22466) captured from his vantage point on board the Lunar Module Challenger as he and Dr. Harrison Schmitt flew over Apollo 17's landing site in the Taurus-Littrow Valley. The broad, sunlit face of the mountain dubbed South Massif, rises near the center of the frame, above the dark floor of Taurus-Littrow to its left. Beyond the mountains, toward the lunar limb, lies the Moon's Mare Serenitatis. Piloted by Ron Evans, the Command Module America is visible in orbit in the foreground against the South Massif's peak.

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Re: APOD: Apollo 17: A Stereo View from Lunar... (2012 Dec 1

Post by abhagwat » Thu Dec 13, 2012 7:18 am

What I did not understand in this picture ia, how come the command module be seen below the lunar module? Can anyone please explain? Thank you.

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Re: APOD: Apollo 17: A Stereo View from Lunar... (2012 Dec 1

Post by tli_22722 » Thu Dec 13, 2012 10:22 am

abhagwat wrote:What I did not understand in this picture ia, how come the command module be seen below the lunar module? Can anyone please explain? Thank you.
This is entirely possible.
Shortly before landing, the CSM was in a circular lunar orbit.
The LM entered a elliptical descent orbit, with the perilune approaching the landing site.
So after a half revolution (apolune) the LM was well above the CSM.
Apollo flight profile: http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/ima ... -34071.jpg

BTW: Happy 40th anniversary to Apollo 17!

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Re: APOD: Apollo 17: A Stereo View from Lunar... (2012 Dec 1

Post by Guest » Thu Dec 13, 2012 10:43 am

Argh... I goofed when sending my reply, sorry sorry... can't erase because of lost password, I'll have to open a new account one of these days.

Awsome picture indeed! What I think I'd wanted to know in order to get a better grasp of the geometry :

what are altitude estimates for both modules and distance from one to another ? Also, approx height of the mountains below .

Thanks

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Re: APOD: Apollo 17: A Stereo View from Lunar... (2012 Dec 1

Post by neufer » Thu Dec 13, 2012 2:48 pm

tli_22722 wrote:
abhagwat wrote:
What I did not understand in this picture is, how come the command module be seen below the lunar module? Can anyone please explain? Thank you.
This is entirely possible.

Shortly before landing, the CSM was in a circular lunar orbit.

The LM entered a elliptical descent orbit, with the perilune approaching the landing site.

So after a half revolution (apolune) the LM was well above the CSM.
Art Neuendorffer

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Re: APOD: Apollo 17: A Stereo View from Lunar... (2012 Dec 1

Post by Beyond » Thu Dec 13, 2012 3:07 pm

pantaloons :?: :?: Geeze neufer, when you said you were older than dirt, i didn't realize how old the dirt was that you were referring to :!: :lol2:
Last edited by Beyond on Thu Dec 13, 2012 5:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: APOD: Apollo 17: A Stereo View from Lunar... (2012 Dec 1

Post by neufer » Thu Dec 13, 2012 4:06 pm

Beyond wrote:
pantaloons :?: :?:

Geeze neufer, when you said you were older that dirt, i didn't realize how old the dirt was that you were referring to :!:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trousers wrote:
<<During the French Revolution, the male citizens of France adopted a working-class costume including ankle-length trousers, or pantaloons (from a Commedia dell'Arte character named Pantalone) in place of the aristocratic knee-breeches. The new garment of the revolutionaries differed from that of the ancien regime upper classes in three ways: it was loose where the style for breeches had most recently been form-fitting, it was ankle length where breeches had generally been knee-length for more than two centuries, and they were open at the bottom while breeches were fastened. This style was introduced to England in the early 19th century, possibly by Beau Brummell, and by mid-century had supplanted breeches as fashionable street wear. At this point, even knee-length pants adopted the open bottoms of trousers (see shorts) and were worn by young boys, for sports, and in tropical climates. Breeches proper survived into the 20th century as court dress, and also in baggy mid-calf (or three-quarter length) versions known as plus-fours or knickers worn for active sports and by young school-boys. Types of breeches are still worn today by baseball and American football players.

Sailors may have played a role in the worldwide dissemination of trousers as a fashion. In the 17th and 18th centuries, sailors wore baggy trousers known as galligaskins. Sailors also pioneered the wearing of jeans, trousers made of denim. These became more popular in the late 19th century in the American West because of their ruggedness and durability.>>
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pantalone wrote:
<<Pantalone, or Pantalone de' bisognosi, Italian for 'Pantalone of the needy', is one of the most important principal characters found in commedia del arte. With his exceptional greed and status at the top of the social order, Pantalone is "money" in the commedia world.

Commedia productions date back to Italy around the year 1560, making the origin for Pantalone's character quite difficult to determine. The most common explanation for the name "Pantalone" comes from the Italian phrase pianta leone, translated as "plant the lion." The lion may, in fact, refer to the emblem of the Republic of Venice, and Venice's conquests around the globe where Venetians had literally "planted the lion" flag. Another explanation is that the name comes from Saint Pantaleon (in Italian Pantaleone), a saint venerated in Venice. Pantalone's character is always a Venetian old man, "a rich and almost miserly old merchant, always decrepit and stumbling." The character of Pantalone is entirely based on money and ego, for he has the highest regards for his intelligence, "but at every step he becomes the butt for EVERy conceivable kind of trick". With little else to occupy his thoughts after a life as a tradesman or merchant, Pantalone is the metaphorical representation of money in the commedia world. Pantalone is usually the father to one of the lovers, another stock character found in commedia. He is driven to keep his child and their respective lover apart. Pantalone is presented either as a widower or bachelor, and despite his age, makes numerous passes at the women within the commedia world, "though he is always rejected". Pantalone never forgets a deal and his merit is based on actions, not words.
Image
Despite his sinister and often inhumane treatment towards his fellows, Pantalone is perceived to be a pivotal part of commedia. His importance is represented in almost every commedia production; often placing him at the beginning of the comedy. In a commedia comedy, many zanni or lazzi routines will begin by an action delivered by Pantalone himself.

The traditional Pantalone stance is that of a hunch-backed old man. While it would generally be assumed the hunch-backed position may be one of an elderly old man, it is really for the protection of his money bag that generates his apparent frailty. He walks with his hips forward, allowing him to make larger strides when he walks. He often falls backwards, generally to bad news related in some way or another to his financials. When this occurs, he is often amusingly "turtle-like" and is often stuck in that position until assisted. None of Pantalone's physical actions should look easy, for his is truly "the oldest of the old".

Pantalone's character has transcended through the decades; "were we to seek his present-day counterpart we should not be far wrong in thinking of a middle-aged businessman, wealthy and well esteemed, apt at times to dally with ladies full of doubtful virtue, at other times as apt to show himself the devoted father anxious to protect a young son or puzzled by the actions of a daughter he does not understand". Parts of his character, from the overprotective father to the greedy man concerned with nothing but his wealth, are traits familiar to today's pop-culture world. For example, the school principal in the film Sixteen Candles (1984) is an interpretation of the Pantalone character, for his goal is to keep the two main characters from being together and to maintain some type of control of his school. He is the bitter old man determined to keep his students from having any kind of fun. On the television show The Simpsons, Mr. Burns, owner of the Springfield Nuclear Power Plant and the richest citizen of Springfield, is perhaps the epitome of the Pantalone character. He is greedy, stingy, and occasionally downright mean.>>
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Re: APOD: Apollo 17: A Stereo View from Lunar... (2012 Dec 1

Post by Fred Max » Fri Dec 14, 2012 12:16 am

What makes you think that I have red/blue glasses...???
FM

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Re: APOD: Apollo 17: A Stereo View from Lunar... (2012 Dec 1

Post by Anthony Barreiro » Fri Dec 14, 2012 12:55 am

Fred Max wrote:What makes you think that I have red/blue glasses...???
FM
http://www.rainbowsymphonystore.com/3dglasses.html

among other vendors. An internet search for "3d glasses" should give you plenty of options.
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Re: APOD: Apollo 17: A Stereo View from Lunar... (2012 Dec 1

Post by Melisande » Fri Dec 14, 2012 3:22 am

Do they have 3D recorder back in 1972 ???

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Re: APOD: Apollo 17: A Stereo View from Lunar... (2012 Dec 1

Post by alter-ego » Fri Dec 14, 2012 4:30 am

Anthony Barreiro wrote:
Fred Max wrote:What makes you think that I have red/blue glasses...???
FM
http://www.rainbowsymphonystore.com/3dglasses.html

among other vendors. An internet search for "3d glasses" should give you plenty of options.
The images below are the component red and blue images. View these images from ~18" with relaxed eyes and let the images overlap in the middle, you'll view the 3D version without glasses. When you're comfortable and have "locked on" to the 3D image, try increasing your browser magnification in real time (I can with the ctrl key + mouse wheel). I find I can get to 170% without much problem.

Not as big an image as using the glasses, but this technique works pretty well - especially if you don't have any 8-)
Apollo Stereo.JPG
Use the images below, if you prefer the crossed-eyes view:
Crossed.JPG
You do not have the required permissions to view the files attached to this post.
Last edited by alter-ego on Fri Dec 14, 2012 7:11 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: APOD: Apollo 17: A Stereo View from Lunar... (2012 Dec 1

Post by Chris Peterson » Fri Dec 14, 2012 5:14 am

Melisande wrote:Do they have 3D recorder back in 1972 ???
Not needed. It's just a couple of pictures made a few seconds apart, which gives slightly different views.
Chris

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Re: APOD: Apollo 17: A Stereo View from Lunar... (2012 Dec 1

Post by Chris Peterson » Fri Dec 14, 2012 5:16 am

alter-ego wrote:The images below are the component red and blue images.
Thanks. I always knock these out in Photoshop when presented with a red/blue anaglyph. Even though I have glasses, I don't like the effect at all. Stereo pairs like this provide a much better effect, I think (you can reverse the images so you look at them with crossed eyes, and that allows for full-sized images to be used).
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Re: APOD: Apollo 17: A Stereo View from Lunar... (2012 Dec 1

Post by alter-ego » Fri Dec 14, 2012 7:17 am

Chris Peterson wrote:
alter-ego wrote:The images below are the component red and blue images.
Thanks. I always knock these out in Photoshop when presented with a red/blue anaglyph. Even though I have glasses, I don't like the effect at all. Stereo pairs like this provide a much better effect, I think (you can reverse the images so you look at them with crossed eyes, and that allows for full-sized images to be used).
Thanks for that response. It is true the crossed-eyes view permits a larger image. When I want large angles I like that method, but typically I'm drawn to the relaxed way because of less eye strain.

I've now added the image set for using crossed eyes. Kind of fun to go from one to the other.
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Re: APOD: Apollo 17: A Stereo View from Lunar... (2012 Dec 1

Post by neufer » Fri Dec 14, 2012 1:28 pm

Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Chris Peterson wrote:
Melisande wrote:
Do they have 3D recorder back in 1972 ???
Not needed. It's just a couple of pictures made a few seconds apart, which gives slightly different views.
Although the quasi-synchronous orbital rotation of CSM with LM probably makes the (relatively large & hence quite close) CSM appear to be much more distant than it actually was.

(Unlike the distant moon out your car window that just appears to be following you, CMS actually IS following LM and hence appears to be distant.)
Art Neuendorffer