APOD: The Large Cloud of Magellan (2013 May 28)

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APOD: The Large Cloud of Magellan (2013 May 28)

Postby APOD Robot » Tue May 28, 2013 4:11 am

Image The Large Cloud of Magellan

Explanation: The 16th century Portuguese navigator Ferdinand Magellan and his crew had plenty of time to study the southern sky during the first circumnavigation of planet Earth. As a result, two fuzzy cloud-like objects easily visible to southern hemisphere skygazers are known as the Clouds of Magellan, now understood to be satellite galaxies of our much larger, spiral Milky Way galaxy. About 160,000 light-years distant in the constellation Dorado, the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is seen here in a remarkably deep, colorful, and annotated composite image. Spanning about 15,000 light-years or so, it is the most massive of the Milky Way's satellite galaxies and is the home of the closest supernova in modern times, SN 1987A. The prominent patch just left of center is 30 Doradus, also known as the magnificent Tarantula Nebula, is a giant star-forming region about 1,000 light-years across.

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Re: APOD: The Large Cloud of Magellan (2013 May 28)

Postby Beyond » Tue May 28, 2013 4:23 am

Whatta BIG APOD picture!! I suppose it has to be to fit everything in. There's a lotta stuff there. Even a very big Tarantula. EEK :!: :lol2:
But I'm wondering if the Mu Men are friendly or not?
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Re: APOD: The Large Cloud of Magellan (2013 May 28)

Postby Ann » Tue May 28, 2013 4:38 am

Yes! I was hoping that Ferdinand was Magellan and that the "Ferdinand's Fuzzy" that yesterday's teaser spoke of would turn out to be one of the Magellanic Clouds.

This is a superior image. And the LMC is a treasure trove of galactic goodies indeed, and this image does them wonderful justice.

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Re: APOD: The Large Cloud of Magellan (2013 May 28)

Postby StarTrailer@3ap.org » Tue May 28, 2013 5:43 am

can anyone tell me how large the field of view in this image is, please?

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Re: APOD: The Large Cloud of Magellan (2013 May 28)

Postby MargaritaMc » Tue May 28, 2013 8:59 am

This is a beautiful image - but the annotations don't have my favourite Hodges!

viewtopic.php?f=23&t=30813&start=700#p199733

To be fair - the image would have to be far too large to be an Apod to include all the amazing detail of the image found by Ann that is linked from the Quiz thread topic above...

Margarita
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Re: APOD: The Large Cloud of Magellan (2013 May 28)

Postby starsurfer » Tue May 28, 2013 10:09 am

When I saw yesterday's clue, I knew it was this amazing image by Lorenzo and co., simply stunning!! The LMC is one of my favourite southern objects and I would love to be able to see it in the night sky in Chile or some other remote place! :D There's still a lot of mystery about the clouds, they might not actually be satellites of the Milky Way and might be interlopers that were captured a long time ago. I think there are a few papers about this theory but I don't have time to find them now.

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Re: APOD: The Large Cloud of Magellan (2013 May 28)

Postby starsurfer » Tue May 28, 2013 10:11 am

MargaritaMc wrote:This is a beautiful image - but the annotations don't have my favourite Hodges!

viewtopic.php?f=23&t=30813&start=700#p199733

To be fair - the image would have to be far too large to be an Apod to include all the amazing detail of the image found by Ann that is linked from the Quiz thread topic above...

Margarita

The Hodge globulars are highlighted in this labeled version of a mosaic by Rob Gendler: http://www.robgendlerastropics.com/LMCmosaic.html
Observing with a telescope, you could get lost for hours in the maze of clusters and nebulae!! There's hundreds of things that have never been imaged in a closeup long focal length image. :(

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Re: APOD: The Large Cloud of Magellan (2013 May 28)

Postby MargaritaMc » Tue May 28, 2013 10:59 am

starsurfer wrote:
MargaritaMc wrote:This is a beautiful image - but the annotations don't have my favourite Hodges!

viewtopic.php?f=23&t=30813&start=700#p199733

To be fair - the image would have to be far too large to be an Apod to include all the amazing detail of the image found by Ann that is linked from the Quiz thread topic above...

Margarita

The Hodge globulars are highlighted in this labeled version of a mosaic by Rob Gendler: http://www.robgendlerastropics.com/LMCmosaic.html
Observing with a telescope, you could get lost for hours in the maze of clusters and nebulae!! There's hundreds of things that have never been imaged in a closeup long focal length image. :(

Yes! That's the labeled image that Ann gave in what I (above) called the Quiz thread! It is a splendid piece of work, isn't it? I got lost in it for ages.

I didn't know what the Hodge catalogue was, so set a puzzle about it rather than simply ask a direct question on the forum!

Another catalogue that I've been unable to discover is the one that gives several objects in the LMC the 'name' DEM L followed by a number.

I've web searched and found this article that studies them,but it gives no clue about who or what gave rise to the DEM acronym.

The nearest possibility that I came across was Differential Emission Measures.

Has anyone any information about this category in the LMC? :?:

Margarita
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: APOD: The Large Cloud of Magellan (2013 May 28)

Postby Boomer12k » Tue May 28, 2013 12:40 pm

Awesome....thanks for the Annotation as well. :D

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Re: APOD: The Large Cloud of Magellan (2013 May 28)

Postby Beyond » Tue May 28, 2013 1:08 pm

MargaritaMc wrote:

Another catalogue that I've been unable to discover is the one that gives several objects in the LMC the 'name' DEM L followed by a number.

I've web searched and found this article that studies them,but it gives no clue about who or what gave rise to the DEM acronym.

The nearest possibility that I came across was Differential Emission Measures.

Has anyone any information about this category in the LMC? :?:

Margarita

I found this acronym website http://www.acronymfinder.com but it doesn't have DEM L. I surmise that the "L" stands for log.
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Re: APOD: The Large Cloud of Magellan (2013 May 28)

Postby NGC3314 » Tue May 28, 2013 1:11 pm

MargaritaMc wrote:Another catalogue that I've been unable to discover is the one that gives several objects in the LMC the 'name' DEM L followed by a number.

I've web searched and found this article that studies them,but it gives no clue about who or what gave rise to the DEM acronym.


Got it: the source for the DEM numbers is this paper by Davies, Elliott, and Meaburn.

The nebular complexes of the large and small Magellanic Clouds

Long exposures of the complexes of ionized hydrogen in both the LMC and SMC have been taken with the 48-in. SRC Schmidt camera through a H-alpha + forbidden NII interference filter of 100-A bandwidth. These plates and identifying charts are presented in a form in which little information is lost. A catalog of many individual emission regions in both these galaxies is also compiled. The relationships between the nebulosities and OB associations as well as between 21-cm neutral hydrogen emission and continuum radio emission are discussed, and a number of supernova-remnant candidates are listed for further study.


The scanned PDF of the full article isn't too bad in retaining visibility of the objects - they have a bunch of map-like sketches as well to distinguish which one is which.

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Re: APOD: The Large Cloud of Magellan (2013 May 28)

Postby ta152h0 » Tue May 28, 2013 3:46 pm

Very nice and you can always projected on a big screen at sports stadiums, during night games. Now that would be cool. Like Mr Stafford's song, Wildwood weed , " take a trip and never leave the ground "
Wolf Kotenberg

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Re: APOD: The Large Cloud of Magellan (2013 May 28)

Postby MargaritaMc » Tue May 28, 2013 5:06 pm

Beyond wrote:
MargaritaMc wrote:

Another catalogue that I've been unable to discover is the one that gives several objects in the LMC the 'name' DEM L followed by a number.

I've web searched and found this article that studies them,but it gives no clue about who or what gave rise to the :arrow: DEM acronym.

The nearest possibility that I came across was Differential Emission Measures.

Has anyone any information about this category in the LMC? :?:

Margarita

I found this acronym website http://www.acronymfinder.com but it doesn't have DEM L. I surmise that the "L" stands for log.


Beyond - ¡That's the acronym website that I looked up and found "Differential Emission Measures" :!: :lol2:
The thought that the L stands for log is a possibility - but WHO or WHERE created this list of astronomical objects? What is the rational for the list?

The use of unexplained acronyms in astronomy drives me totally batty ! :bang:

Ooh, I feel better having got that off my chest! :lol2:

Back to studying the spectra of stars...

....
PS. Later edit: THANK YOU "NGC 3324"! :clap: :clap: :clap:
I've just properly read your post - and I finally see! The DEM = Davies, Elliot and Meaburn.

Margarita
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— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: APOD: The Large Cloud of Magellan (2013 May 28)

Postby Beyond » Tue May 28, 2013 6:48 pm

So then... DEM l, would be the Davies, Elliot and Meaburn. List. Now that wasn't so hard... was it :?: :lol2:
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Re: APOD: The Large Cloud of Magellan (2013 May 28)

Postby MargaritaMc » Tue May 28, 2013 7:35 pm

Beyond wrote:So then... DEM l, would be the Davies, Elliot and Meaburn. List. Now that wasn't so hard... was it :?: :lol2:

Image

You know what I'm like, Beyond - dashing around so fast that I don't stop to look properly... :roll: :lol2:
Margarita

PS. Later edit - the 'L' stands for Large and 'S' stands for Small,
So DEM L73 is a nebular complex in the LARGE Magellanic Cloud studied by D, E and M.
And DEM S4 will be ditto in the SMALL Magellanic Cloud.

Isn't it simple, once you know?
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: APOD: The Large Cloud of Magellan (2013 May 28)

Postby starsurfer » Wed May 29, 2013 9:05 pm

MargaritaMc wrote:
starsurfer wrote:
MargaritaMc wrote:This is a beautiful image - but the annotations don't have my favourite Hodges!

viewtopic.php?f=23&t=30813&start=700#p199733

To be fair - the image would have to be far too large to be an Apod to include all the amazing detail of the image found by Ann that is linked from the Quiz thread topic above...

Margarita

The Hodge globulars are highlighted in this labeled version of a mosaic by Rob Gendler: http://www.robgendlerastropics.com/LMCmosaic.html
Observing with a telescope, you could get lost for hours in the maze of clusters and nebulae!! There's hundreds of things that have never been imaged in a closeup long focal length image. :(

Yes! That's the labeled image that Ann gave in what I (above) called the Quiz thread! It is a splendid piece of work, isn't it? I got lost in it for ages.

I didn't know what the Hodge catalogue was, so set a puzzle about it rather than simply ask a direct question on the forum!

Another catalogue that I've been unable to discover is the one that gives several objects in the LMC the 'name' DEM L followed by a number.

I've web searched and found this article that studies them,but it gives no clue about who or what gave rise to the DEM acronym.

The nearest possibility that I came across was Differential Emission Measures.

Has anyone any information about this category in the LMC? :?:

Margarita

Hey Margarita which Quiz thread are you taking about?

The DEM catalogue was publised in 1976 and the three letters are for the three astronomers who compiled it, I suppose you know them now. As well as emission nebuae, some of the DEM nebulae are Wolf Rayet nebulae such as DEM L174 and DEM L315 and some are supernova remnants, most notably DEM 316.

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Re: APOD: The Large Cloud of Magellan (2013 May 28)

Postby MargaritaMc » Wed May 29, 2013 9:53 pm

Hi and thanks for the info, starsurfer! Yes, we had got it sorted - but more detailed information is always gratefully received!
The "Quiz Thread" is actually entitled "Where Am I?"

This is where Moonlady began it and sets out what it is about
viewtopic.php?f=23&t=30813

And this is where I made a puzzle about Paul W. Hodge's catalogue
viewtopic.php?f=23&t=30813&start=700#p199732

It's still ongoing and I've posted a puzzle today! Do join in - it is good fun, and a jokey way of learning about astronomical objects.

Margarita
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: APOD: The Large Cloud of Magellan (2013 May 28)

Postby Lorenzo Comolli » Sat Jun 01, 2013 9:53 pm

Hei, thank you very much for all the comments! I, and my co-authors, are very grateful.

can anyone tell me how large the field of view in this image is, please?

According to Astrometry.net it is 7.67 x 7.55 deg
http://nova.astrometry.net/user_images/53443#annotated

Lorenzo

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Re: APOD: The Large Cloud of Magellan (2013 May 28)

Postby MargaritaMc » Sun Jun 02, 2013 7:47 am

Lorenzo Comolli wrote:Hei, thank you very much for all the comments! I, and my co-authors, are very grateful.

can anyone tell me how large the field of view in this image is, please?

According to Astrometry.net it is 7.67 x 7.55 deg
http://nova.astrometry.net/user_images/53443#annotated

Lorenzo

And thank YOU, Lorenzo, for the splendid image and for the Astrometry.net link. Others here probably already know of it, but I am still relatively new to astronomy and am highly grateful for every extra source of information :D

Best wishes
Margarita
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
— Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS


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