APOD: A Solstice Night in Paris (2019 Jun 28)

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APOD: A Solstice Night in Paris (2019 Jun 28)

Post by APOD Robot » Fri Jun 28, 2019 4:22 am

[img]https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/calendar/S_190628.jpg[/img] A Solstice Night in Paris

Explanation: The night of June 21 was the shortest night for planet Earth's northern latitudes, so at latitude 48.9 degrees north, Paris was no exception. Still, the City of Light had an exceptionally luminous evening. Its skies were flooded with silvery night shining or noctilucent clouds after the solstice sunset. Hovering at the edge of space, the icy condensations on meteoric dust or volcanic ash are still in full sunlight at the extreme altitudes of the mesophere. Seen at high latitudes in summer months, stunning, wide spread displays of northern noctilucent clouds are now being reported.

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Ann
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Re: APOD: A Solstice Night in Paris (2019 Jun 28)

Post by Ann » Fri Jun 28, 2019 7:59 am

There were some lovely clouds all over Europa on summer solstice night. The clouds were bright and beautiful particularly during the twilight hours, but they faded towards midnight.

Today's APOD is beautiful.

Ann
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Re: APOD: A Solstice Night in Paris (2019 Jun 28)

Post by JohnD » Fri Jun 28, 2019 8:14 am

What's the black blob?
Flaw, flyspeck, blimp, odd aeroplane??

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Re: APOD: A Solstice Night in Paris (2019 Jun 28)

Post by Ann » Fri Jun 28, 2019 9:08 am

JohnD wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 8:14 am
What's the black blob?
Flaw, flyspeck, blimp, odd aeroplane??
Maybe a small low-lying cloud that is not illuminated by the Sun?

Ann
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Re: APOD: A Solstice Night in Paris (2019 Jun 28)

Post by orin stepanek » Fri Jun 28, 2019 12:12 pm

Beautiful! :D
Orin

Smile today; tomorrow's another day!

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Re: APOD: A Solstice Night in Paris (2019 Jun 28)

Post by neufer » Fri Jun 28, 2019 2:06 pm

https://www.cnbc.com/2019/06/27/temperatures-in-france-hit-104-f-and-they-could-go-higher.html wrote:
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
France hits a record high temperature of 111 F in scorching heatwave
Silvia Amaro, Thu, Jun 27 2019 5:27 AM EDT

<<France registered its highest temperature since records began Friday, agency Meteo France reported, with much of Europe engulfed in a sweltering heatwave. The mercury hit 44.3 (111.74 Fahrenheit) degrees centigrade in Carpentras, in the southern Vaucluse region. The previous record was 44.1 centigrade, reached during the deadly heatwave of 2003. Almost the entire country is on orange alert — the second-highest in the agency’s scale for weather warnings. And four regions in the southern part of the country were put under red alert — the highest using the same scale — on Friday. The heat could lead to a 10% cut in wheat production, one analyst told CNBC. “Currently we have very high temperatures in France and we feel that will have some impact on wheat yield,” Gautier Maupu, international consultant at Agritel, a French agricultural and agroindustry markets research provider, told CNBC Thursday. If the heatwave lasts more than 10 days, the reduction in yield will be even higher, Maupu added.>>
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Re: APOD: A Solstice Night in Paris (2019 Jun 28)

Post by LoicM » Fri Jun 28, 2019 5:27 pm

Ann wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 7:59 am
There were some lovely clouds all over Europa on summer solstice night. The clouds were bright and beautiful particularly during the twilight hours, but they faded towards midnight.

Today's APOD is beautiful.

Ann
Thank you :)

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Re: APOD: A Solstice Night in Paris (2019 Jun 28)

Post by LoicM » Fri Jun 28, 2019 5:30 pm

Ann wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 9:08 am
JohnD wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 8:14 am
What's the black blob?
Flaw, flyspeck, blimp, odd aeroplane??
Maybe a small low-lying cloud that is not illuminated by the Sun?

Ann
yes it's only a small low-lying cloud not illuminated by the sun that is between -6 and -16 degrees under the horizon.
You can see other clouds like this one on the larger panorama the same date at the same place on my Flickr account.

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Re: APOD: A Solstice Night in Paris (2019 Jun 28)

Post by LoicM » Fri Jun 28, 2019 5:31 pm

neufer wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 2:06 pm
https://www.cnbc.com/2019/06/27/temperatures-in-france-hit-104-f-and-they-could-go-higher.html wrote:
Click to play embedded YouTube video.
France hits a record high temperature of 111 F in scorching heatwave
Silvia Amaro, Thu, Jun 27 2019 5:27 AM EDT

<<France registered its highest temperature since records began Friday, agency Meteo France reported, with much of Europe engulfed in a sweltering heatwave. The mercury hit 44.3 (111.74 Fahrenheit) degrees centigrade in Carpentras, in the southern Vaucluse region. The previous record was 44.1 centigrade, reached during the deadly heatwave of 2003. Almost the entire country is on orange alert — the second-highest in the agency’s scale for weather warnings. And four regions in the southern part of the country were put under red alert — the highest using the same scale — on Friday. The heat could lead to a 10% cut in wheat production, one analyst told CNBC. “Currently we have very high temperatures in France and we feel that will have some impact on wheat yield,” Gautier Maupu, international consultant at Agritel, a French agricultural and agroindustry markets research provider, told CNBC Thursday. If the heatwave lasts more than 10 days, the reduction in yield will be even higher, Maupu added.>>
i confirm, since monday, we are betwwe 32° and 38 degrees in Paris, and temperature never under 20 degrees during nights.

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Re: APOD: A Solstice Night in Paris (2019 Jun 28)

Post by neufer » Fri Jun 28, 2019 5:46 pm

LoicM wrote:
Fri Jun 28, 2019 5:31 pm

i confirm, since monday, we are betwwe 32° and 38 degrees in Paris, and temperature never under 20 degrees during nights.
Hopefully, it is even warmer under those yellow vests.
Art Neuendorffer

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Re: APOD: A Solstice Night in Paris (2019 Jun 28)

Post by neufer » Sat Jun 29, 2019 1:00 am

https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/145249/heatwave-scorches-europe wrote:
Earth Observatory:
Heatwave Scorches Europe

by Kathryn Hansen, June 27, 2019

<<It’s early summer and Europe is already feeling the heat. Many parts of the continent saw the hottest temperatures so far for 2019, with some cities recording their hottest day on record.

The heatwave is apparent on this map, which shows temperatures across Europe on June 27, 2019. The map was derived from the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) model, and represents air temperatures at 2 meters above the ground. The darkest red areas are where the model shows temperatures surpassing 40°C.

The GEOS model, like all weather and climate models, uses mathematical equations that represent physical processes (like precipitation and cloud processes) to calculate what the atmosphere will do. Actual measurements of physical properties, like temperature, moisture, and winds, are routinely folded into the model to keep the simulation as close to observed reality as possible.

On June 27, an awareness report from the Network of European Meteorological Services specified “very dangerous” temperatures—the highest alert level—in parts of Spain, France, Switzerland, and Croatia. The meteorological department in France listed numerous cities where records for the hottest June day were broken, many of which were set during the deadly heatwave in 2003. France’s national record for the hottest temperature (of any time of the year), set in 2003, was broken in the town of Carpentras, which hit 45.9°C (114.6°F) on June 28 at 4:20 p.m. local time.

The 2019 heatwave got its start in late June, when warm air masses from the Sahara first hit Spain and then spread to Central Europe. News reports also cite a pair of high-pressure systems responsible for drawing in the warm air and suppressing cloud cover. The exceptional heat was expected to last through the month.>>
Art Neuendorffer

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Re: APOD: A Solstice Night in Paris (2019 Jun 28)

Post by JohnD » Sat Jun 29, 2019 7:31 pm

Thank you, Anne, LoicM,
John

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Re: APOD: A Solstice Night in Paris (2019 Jun 28)

Post by neufer » Mon Jul 01, 2019 7:26 pm

https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/145202/clouds-light-the-night wrote:
Earth Observatory : Clouds Light the Night
Michael Carlowicz, June 12, 2019

<<As spring turns to summer in the northern hemisphere each year, unusual streaks of clouds form high in the atmosphere around sunset in the world’s high latitudes (typically 50° to 65° North). On some days, the clouds are visible at middle latitudes. In June 2019, they have been stretching as far south as anyone can remember.

:arrow: This image shows a satellite view of noctilucent or “night shining” clouds on June 12, 2019. Noctilucent clouds draw their name from the fact that they appear in the twilight hour just after sundown. They float so high in the atmosphere that they are still lit by sunlight even after the Sun has dropped below the horizon for people on the ground. The image is centered on the North Pole and is based on data acquired by NASA’s Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) spacecraft. The instrument measures albedo, or the amount of light reflected back to space by the high-altitude clouds. The map is a composite view stitched together from several satellite passes. As Earth’s lower atmosphere warms with spring and summer, the upper atmosphere grows cooler. In the process, ice crystals collect on meteor dust and other particles, creating electric blue wisps on the edge of space—usually 80 to 85 kilometers (50 to 53 miles) in altitude. In the AIM map, noctilucent clouds appear in various shades of light blue to white, depending on the density of the ice particles.

According to amateur astronomers, citizen scientists, and several media outlets, noctilucent clouds have regularly appeared in the middle latitudes of North America and Europe in June 2019. Spaceweather.com reported an outbreak of the clouds on June 8-9 that was visible from Oklahoma, New Mexico, and the southern California desert. Reports have come in from many countries in Europe, as well. The season typically starts in late May and ends in August. Since the launch of AIM in 2007, researchers have found that noctilucent clouds are stretching to lower latitudes with greater frequency. There is some evidence that this is a result of changes in the atmosphere, including more water vapor, due to climate change. Spaceweather.com reported that AIM mission scientists at the University of Colorado have observed more moisture in the mesosphere in June 2019 than they have observed in 12 years. The clouds are also more common during solar minimum, the lowest ebb of solar flares and sunspots in the Sun’s 11-year cycle of activity. Lower solar activity means there is a bit less ultraviolet radiation breaking up the water molecules at high altitudes. The Sun is currently near its minimum.

Another NASA vehicle also observed noctilucent clouds recently. The Curiosity Mars rover acquired an image of the clouds in the skies over Mars on May 17, 2019, or sol 2,410 of the mission. The image above was acquired by Curiosity’s Navcams while looking up from Gale Crater.>>
Art Neuendorffer