APOD: Perseid Outburst at Westmeath Lookout (2021 Sep 24)

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APOD: Perseid Outburst at Westmeath Lookout (2021 Sep 24)

Post by APOD Robot » Fri Sep 24, 2021 4:05 am

Image Perseid Outburst at Westmeath Lookout

Explanation: This year an outburst of Perseid meteors surprised skywatchers. The reliable meteor shower's peak was predicted for the night of August 12/13. But persistent visual observers in North America were deluged with a startling Perseid shower outburst a day later, with reports of multiple meteors per minute and sometimes per second in the early hours of August 14. The shower radiant is high in a dark night sky in this composite image. It painstakingly registers the trails of 282 Perseids captured during the stunning outburst activity between 0650 UT (02:50am EDT) and 0900 UT (05:00am EDT) on August 14 from Westmeath Lookout, Ontario. Of course the annual Perseid meteor shower is associated with planet Earth's passage through dusty debris from periodic comet 109P/Swift-Tuttle. The 2021 outburst could have been caused by an unanticipated encounter with the Perseid Filament, a denser ribbon of dust inside the broader debris zone.

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Re: APOD: Perseid Outburst at Westmeath Lookout (2021 Sep 24)

Post by Ann » Fri Sep 24, 2021 6:10 am

IMG_9365-Aug1314-2021-282-meteors1024[1].jpg
Perseid Outburst at Westmeath Lookout.
Image Credit & Copyright: Pierre Martin

Beautiful and impressive!

Note how the band of the Milky Way runs horizontally near the top of the picture. You can see the Double Cluster of Perseus, which looks like two equally bright white dots surrounded by some fluff, in the right part of the Milky Way. Divide the band of the Milky Way in half, and then the Double Cluster is halfway between the middle of the Milky Way and the right hand edge of the picture. At far right, again in the band of the Milky Way, you can see the Alpha Perseus Moving Cluster, which is a relatively loose grouping of stars.

Between the Double Cluster and the Alpha Perseus Moving Cluster is a star - I think it is Gamma Perseus - which seems to be quite close to the point (now what is that point called?) from which almost all the Perseids seem to emanate.

I'm not annotating this image, because if I do, I will have to upload it to my computer. And once I upload it, I can't remove it. If I upload a document, then I can remove it, because my computer has a "Remove" function for documents. But for images, there is no "Remove" function. I can do a lot of things with the images I have uploaded, such as edit them, rotate them and share them, but I can't remove them. Yes, I can remove them from easy and quick access, but I can't remove them from my hard disk. So any image I upload is going to stay in my hard disk forever, and this one wasn't worth it.

Ann
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Re: APOD: Perseid Outburst at Westmeath Lookout (2021 Sep 24)

Post by orin stepanek » Fri Sep 24, 2021 11:54 am

Glad they're tiny! :wink:
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Re: APOD: Perseid Outburst at Westmeath Lookout (2021 Sep 24)

Post by Chris Peterson » Fri Sep 24, 2021 2:10 pm

The peak as seen here in Colorado.
_
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Re: APOD: Perseid Outburst at Westmeath Lookout (2021 Sep 24)

Post by neufer » Fri Sep 24, 2021 3:11 pm

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whitewater_Region wrote:
<<Whitewater Region is a township on the Ottawa River in Renfrew County, located within the scenic Ottawa Valley in eastern Ontario, Canada. Whitewater Region is made up of the former municipalities of Beachburg, Ross, Cobden and Westmeath.

Champlain set out on May 27, 1613, to continue his exploration of the Huron country and in hopes of finding the "northern sea" (probably Hudson Bay) he had heard about. Champlain traveled the Ottawa River, later giving the first description of this area. Along the way, he left behind a cache of silver cups, copper kettles, and a brass astrolabe dated 1603 that was found in 1867 by a farm boy named Edward Lee near Cobden, Ontario. Captain Cowley, who operated a steamboat on nearby Muskrat Lake, offered Lee ten dollars for the astrolabe. Lee gave it to him but never received any money. The astrolabe is the smallest of the 35 mariner's astrolabes surviving from the early part of the 17th century, and the only one from France. Although meant to be used vertically to measure the position of the sun at its zenith, all the quadrants of the disc are graduated.

The Algonquins, wary of the European intrusion into their territory, deterred Champlain from going farther by telling him that Vignau had lied about the route. It did, however, exist: the English explorer Henry Hudson had reached Hudson Bay in 1610. Champlain continued to work to improve relations with the natives, promising to help them in their struggles against the Iroquois. With his native guides, he explored further up the Ottawa River and reached Lake Nipissing. He then followed the French River until he reached Lake Huron.>>
Last edited by neufer on Fri Sep 24, 2021 5:25 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: APOD: Perseid Outburst at Westmeath Lookout (2021 Sep 24)

Post by Joe Stieber » Fri Sep 24, 2021 3:56 pm

The photographer, Pierre Martin, posted this same picture in the Spaceweather Photo Gallery on Sept 20. He included a relatively lengthy description of the circumstances.

https://spaceweathergallery.com/indiv_u ... _id=178039

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Re: APOD: Perseid Outburst at Westmeath Lookout (2021 Sep 24)

Post by ta152h0 » Fri Sep 24, 2021 5:50 pm

Just when you think you know everything, good old Murphy sends you another surprise in a never ending history of the Universe. pass the ice cold one.
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Re: APOD: Perseid Outburst at Westmeath Lookout (2021 Sep 24)

Post by johnnydeep » Fri Sep 24, 2021 6:45 pm

Ann wrote:
I'm not annotating this image, because if I do, I will have to upload it to my computer. And once I upload it, I can't remove it. If I upload a document, then I can remove it, because my computer has a "Remove" function for documents. But for images, there is no "Remove" function. I can do a lot of things with the images I have uploaded, such as edit them, rotate them and share them, but I can't remove them. Yes, I can remove them from easy and quick access, but I can't remove them from my hard disk. So any image I upload is going to stay in my hard disk forever, and this one wasn't worth it.
That seems very strange. What computer do you have?
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Re: APOD: Perseid Outburst at Westmeath Lookout (2021 Sep 24)

Post by Chris Peterson » Fri Sep 24, 2021 6:49 pm

johnnydeep wrote:
Fri Sep 24, 2021 6:45 pm
Ann wrote:
I'm not annotating this image, because if I do, I will have to upload it to my computer. And once I upload it, I can't remove it. If I upload a document, then I can remove it, because my computer has a "Remove" function for documents. But for images, there is no "Remove" function. I can do a lot of things with the images I have uploaded, such as edit them, rotate them and share them, but I can't remove them. Yes, I can remove them from easy and quick access, but I can't remove them from my hard disk. So any image I upload is going to stay in my hard disk forever, and this one wasn't worth it.
That seems very strange. What computer do you have?
Indeed. That is one of the most bizarre things I've ever heard.
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Re: APOD: Perseid Outburst at Westmeath Lookout (2021 Sep 24)

Post by neufer » Fri Sep 24, 2021 10:48 pm

orin stepanek wrote:
Fri Sep 24, 2021 11:54 am

Glad they're tiny! :wink:
https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/images/148844/sudbury-impact-structure wrote:

Sudbury Impact Structure

<<The object responsible for creating Sudbury Basin crashed into Earth about 1.8 billion years ago. That makes this crater in Canada fifty times older than Popigai—one of the world’s most well-preserved craters—which was created a mere 36 million years ago. Much of Sudbury’s original crater, thought to have measured at least 200 kilometers across, has been deformed and eroded. Despite this, the crater has had a lasting impact on the region. This region of Canada owes its unique geology to that powerful collision—initially thought to be an asteroid and later interpreted as a comet. The collision punctured Earth’s crust, allowing material from the mantle to well up from below and fill the basin with melted rock. Then after a shockwave shattered the surrounding rocks, minerals from the melted rock below infiltrated the cracks. People have been making use of the minerals in Sudbury Basin for thousands of years. Large-scale mining operations started with the Murray Mine (now defunct) in the late 1800s. The mining took a toll on the landscape, polluting the region with sulfur dioxide and metals released during smelting processes. In recent decades, efforts have been made to capture emissions and restore the health of the basin’s land and water.>>
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sudbury_Basin wrote:
<<The Sudbury Basin, also known as Sudbury Structure or the Sudbury Nickel Irruptive, is a major geological structure in Ontario, Canada. It is the third-largest known impact crater or astrobleme on Earth, as well as one of the oldest. The crater formed 1.849 billion years ago in the Paleoproterozoic era. The basin is located on the Canadian Shield in the city of Greater Sudbury, Ontario. The former municipalities of Rayside-Balfour, Valley East and Capreol lie within the Sudbury Basin, which is referred to locally as "The Valley". The urban core of the former city of Sudbury lies on the southern outskirts of the basin.

The Sudbury basin formed as a result of an impact into the Nuna supercontinent from a bolide approximately 10–15 km in diameter 1.849 billion years ago in the Paleoproterozoic era. Debris from the impact was thrown more than 800 km; rock fragments ejected by the impact have been found as far away as Minnesota.

Models suggest that for such a large impact, debris was most likely scattered globally, but has since been eroded. Its present size is believed to be a smaller portion of a 130 km round crater that the bolide originally created. Subsequent geological processes have deformed the crater into the current smaller oval shape. Sudbury Basin is the third-largest crater on Earth, after the 300 km Vredefort crater in South Africa, and the 150 km Chicxulub crater under Yucatán, Mexico.

The large impact crater filled with magma containing nickel, copper, palladium, gold, the platinum group and other metals. In 1856 while surveying a baseline westward from Lake Nipissing, provincial land surveyor Albert Salter located magnetic abnormalities in the area that were strongly suggestive of mineral deposits, especially near what would later become Creighton Mine. The area was later examined by Alexander Murray of the Geological Survey of Canada, who confirmed "the presence of an immense mass of magnetic trap". Due to the then-remoteness of the Sudbury area, Salter's discovery did not have much immediate effect. The later construction of the Canadian Pacific Railway through the area, however, made mineral exploration more feasible. The development of a mining settlement occurred in 1883 after blasting at the railway construction site revealed a large concentration of nickel and copper ore at what is now the Murray Mine site, named by owners William and Thomas Murray.

The Vermillion Mine, which was the first in the Basin to be exploited, was the site at which Frank Sperry (a chemist of the Canadian Copper Company) made the first identification in 1889 of the arsenide of platinum which bears his name. As a result of these metal deposits, the Sudbury area is one of the world's major mining communities, and has fathered Vale Inco and Falconbridge Xstrata. The Basin is one of the world's largest suppliers of nickel and copper ores. Most of these mineral deposits are found on its outer rim.

Due to the high mineral content of its soil, the floor of the basin is among the best agricultural land in Northern Ontario, with numerous vegetable, berry, and dairy farms located in the valley. However, because of its northern latitude, it is not as productive as agricultural lands in the southern portion of the province. Accordingly, the region primarily supplies products for consumption within Northern Ontario, and is not a major food exporter.

NASA used the site to train the Apollo astronauts in recognizing rocks formed as the result of a very large impact, such as breccias. Astronauts who would use this training on the Moon included Apollo 15's David Scott and James Irwin, Apollo 16's John Young and Charlie Duke, and Apollo 17's Gene Cernan and Jack Schmitt. Notable geologist instructors included William R. Muehlberger.>>
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Re: APOD: Perseid Outburst at Westmeath Lookout (2021 Sep 24)

Post by Joe Stieber » Sat Sep 25, 2021 12:14 am

Ann wrote:
Fri Sep 24, 2021 6:10 am

I'm not annotating this image, because if I do, I will have to upload it to my computer. And once I upload it, I can't remove it. ... So any image I upload is going to stay in my hard disk forever, and this one wasn't worth it.

Ann
That's a mystery to me as well — why you can't delete image files. In any case, I did a quick label job.

APOD_24-Sept-2021_labeled.jpg
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The Persistence of Memory

Post by neufer » Sat Sep 25, 2021 2:59 am

Click to play embedded YouTube video.
Chris Peterson wrote:
Fri Sep 24, 2021 6:49 pm
johnnydeep wrote:
Fri Sep 24, 2021 6:45 pm

Ann wrote:"I'm not annotating this image, because if I do, I will have to upload it to my computer. And once I upload it, I can't remove it. So any image I upload is going to stay in my hard disk forever, and this one wasn't worth it."

That seems very strange. What computer do you have?
Indeed. That is one of the most bizarre things I've ever heard.
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Re: APOD: Perseid Outburst at Westmeath Lookout (2021 Sep 24)

Post by johnnydeep » Sat Sep 25, 2021 1:14 pm

Joe Stieber wrote:
Sat Sep 25, 2021 12:14 am
Ann wrote:
Fri Sep 24, 2021 6:10 am

I'm not annotating this image, because if I do, I will have to upload it to my computer. And once I upload it, I can't remove it. ... So any image I upload is going to stay in my hard disk forever, and this one wasn't worth it.

Ann
That's a mystery to me as well — why you can't delete image files. In any case, I did a quick label job.


APOD_24-Sept-2021_labeled.jpg
Beautiful!
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Re: The Persistence of Memory

Post by johnnydeep » Sat Sep 25, 2021 1:22 pm

neufer wrote:
Sat Sep 25, 2021 2:59 am
...Salvador Dali's The Persistance Of Memory...
Chris Peterson wrote:
Fri Sep 24, 2021 6:49 pm
johnnydeep wrote:
Fri Sep 24, 2021 6:45 pm

Ann wrote:"I'm not annotating this image, because if I do, I will have to upload it to my computer. And once I upload it, I can't remove it. So any image I upload is going to stay in my hard disk forever, and this one wasn't worth it."

That seems very strange. What computer do you have?
Indeed. That is one of the most bizarre things I've ever heard.
If I had to guess, it might be a Mac, or since Ann mentioned "uploading" maybe a web doc service like Google docs. Or maybe a combination.
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Re: APOD: Perseid Outburst at Westmeath Lookout (2021 Sep 24)

Post by Bird_Man » Sun Sep 26, 2021 5:43 pm

If I had to guess, it might be a Mac, or since Ann mentioned "uploading" maybe a web doc service like Google docs. Or maybe a combination.
I’m not familiar with Google docs, but deleting a file, image or otherwise, is easily done on a Mac. I wonder if there is something in the software Ann uses to annotate files that is limiting what she can do?