Found Images: 2023 September

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Found Images: 2023 September

Post by bystander » Fri Sep 01, 2023 7:56 pm


Have you seen a great image or video somewhere that you think would make a great APOD? Nominate it for APOD! Please post as much information here as you have about the image/video with a link to any source(s) for it you know of here, and the editors will take a look.

When posting the image itself, please do not post anything larger than a thumbnail here; please honor the copyright holder's copyright.

Please keep hotlinked images under 500K.

Thank you!

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starsurfer
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Fri Sep 01, 2023 10:21 pm

K1-17
https://www.imagingdeepspace.com/kohoutek-1-17.html
Copyright: Peter Goodhew and Sven Eklund
GpWcv1aIqVJC_16536x0_Rr9Vgg-0.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Sun Sep 03, 2023 10:42 pm

Abell 66
https://astrodonimaging.com/gallery/abell-66/
Copyright: Don Goldman
Abell66.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Sun Sep 03, 2023 10:48 pm

Sh2-68
http://www.capella-observatory.com/Imag ... Sh2-68.htm
Copyright: Josef Pöpsel, Stefan Binnewies and Frank Sackenheim
Sh2-68.jpg
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ESO: A Golden Halo around the ELT

Post by bystander » Mon Sep 04, 2023 5:07 pm

A Golden Halo around the ELT
ESO Picture of the Week | ELT | 2023 Sep 04
It might look like the opening scene from The Lion King, but this stunning Picture of the Week was actually taken in the Chilean Atacama Desert rather than the African savannas. Taking centre stage is ESO’s Extremely Large Telescope (ELT), or part of it, at least.

The ELT’s steel dome is about 80 metres tall and one day it will play host to the world’s biggest eye on the sky. When finished, the dome will weigh some 6100 tonnes and be capable of rotating 360 degrees on a set of 36 stationary trolleys.

This spectacular photograph of the sunrise over Cerro Armazones, the ELT’s perch, was shot on 29 August from around 23 kilometres away on top of another famous mountain: Cerro Paranal, home to the ELT’s older sibling, ESO’s Very Large Telescope, or VLT. You could say the stars were aligned for this image: since the position of the sunrise changes throughout the year as the Earth moves around the Sun, there’s only a narrow window of time when the sunrise frames the ELT if observed from Paranal.

What’s more, if you look carefully, you can just about make out two sunspots on the Sun’s surface. These dark, cooler regions are formed by intense magnetic fields. While they may look small from this distance, in reality they’re the size of planets.
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ESA: Galactic Isolation (IC 1776)

Post by bystander » Mon Sep 04, 2023 5:28 pm

Galactic Isolation
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2023 Sep 04
The swirls of the galaxy IC 1776 stand in splendid isolation in this image from the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. This galaxy lies over 150 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Pisces.

IC 1776 recently played host to a catastrophically violent explosion — a supernova — which was discovered in 2015 by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search, a robotic telescope which scours the night sky in search of transient phenomena such as supernovae. A network of automatic robotic telescopes are spread across the globe, operated by both professional and amateur astronomers, and, without human intervention, reveal short-lived astronomical phenomena such as wandering asteroids, gravitational microlensing, or supernovae.

Hubble investigated the aftermath of the supernova SN 2015ap during two different observing programmes, both designed to comb through the debris left by supernovae explosions in order to better understand these energetic events. A variety of telescopes automatically follow up the detection of supernovae to obtain early measurements of these events’ brightnesses and spectra. Complementing these measurements with later observations which reveal the lingering energy of supernovae can shed light on the systems which gave rise to these cosmic cataclysms in the first place.
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Tue Sep 05, 2023 10:16 pm

MWP 1 and Alv 1
https://www.astrobin.com/5udyaa/B/
Copyright: Wei-Hao Wang
rGge1UmwRmZ3_16536x0_uD9YQ5TJ.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Tue Sep 05, 2023 10:22 pm

G2.4+1.4
https://celestialphotographer.com/g2.4+1.4
Data: Markus Blauensteiner, Oliver Schneider and Faried Abu-Salih
Processing: Markus Blauensteiner
G2414.jpg
JaFu 1 is one of four planetary nebulae known to be members of a globular cluster.
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Tue Sep 05, 2023 10:26 pm

Sh2-98 region
https://www.astrobin.com/r9oixn/
Copyright: Rolf Dietrich
2YY7UJraZVcX_16536x0_EA4KPnE6.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Tue Sep 05, 2023 10:33 pm

CTA 1
https://www.astrobin.com/gobexs/
Copyright: David Elmore
fi7V_sDb4xAZ_2560x0_w3ksRGJG.jpg
This supernova remnant is also catalogued as G119.5+10.2 and the planetary nebula Kronberger 50 (Kn 50) can be seen near the bottom right corner.
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Fri Sep 08, 2023 10:22 pm

PP 81
https://www.astrobin.com/2jjc4r/
Copyright: Wolfgang Promper
oN3FuvvCcjRE_16536x0_ieTZ0INm.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Sun Sep 10, 2023 9:48 pm


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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Sun Sep 10, 2023 9:50 pm

IC 2051
https://esahubble.org/images/potw1950a/
Copyright: ESA/Hubble & NASA, P. Erwin et al

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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Mon Sep 11, 2023 10:02 pm

IC 1311 and Patchick 6
https://www.astrobin.com/aholep/
Copyright: Nicolas Puig
mrvWVpMJEEHL_16536x0_VqSQIJ22.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Mon Sep 11, 2023 10:05 pm

Sh2-124 and LDu 1
https://www.astrobin.com/fuc6mj/
Copyright: Manuel Peitsch
RTwVi-xCCPBy_16536x0_ieTZ0INm.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by bystander » Wed Sep 13, 2023 6:28 pm

Telescopes among the Clouds
NOIRLab Image of the Week | Gemini | 2023 Sep 06
Near the summit of Maunakea, Gemini North — the northern half of the International Gemini Observatory operated by NSF’s NOIRLab — sits high above the clouds of Hawai‘i in the company of other Maunakea observatories. Being at an altitude of approximately 4200 meters (nearly 14,000 feet) above sea level allows the telescope to capture amazing views of the world beyond Earth’s atmosphere. In addition, Gemini North’s location also grants it stable weather and atmospheric conditions for many nights a year, giving a perfectly clear picture of the sky. At such a high elevation, clouds often form below the summit to form a cloud deck. As is the case in this image however, there are times when clouds accumulate higher in the sky above these facilities. Of course, a few high clouds will not stop astronomers from using Gemini North to make the most of their observations!
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ESO: A Flower with Four Petals

Post by bystander » Wed Sep 13, 2023 7:00 pm

A Flower with Four Petals
ESO Picture of the Week | VLT | 2023 Sep 11
There are several galaxies in this Picture of the Week, but the most fascinating is probably the one surrounded by four light-blue dots, resembling a flower with blue petals. But, are these dots real? Yes and no… Taken with ESO’s Very Large Telescope ([urlhttps://www.eso.org/public/teles-instr/paranal-observatory/vlt/]VLT[/url]), this image shows a so-called Einstein Cross.

The four ‘petals’ are images of a distant galaxy hidden behind the orange galaxy at the centre. Something very fascinating happens to allow us to detect the light from this hidden object: the galaxy at the centre acts as a gravitational lens, bending the light emitted from the distant galaxy around it. As a result, we see several images of the distant galaxy, distorted and magnified. In the special configuration of these two galaxies, the hidden one appears as four images around the central ‘lens’ galaxy, forming a cross-like (or flower-like) pattern dubbed an Einstein Cross. Gravitational lensing thus allows us to discover hidden galaxies that would be otherwise invisible to us.

The observations of this system were conducted with the Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) instrument at ESO’s VLT in Chile. MUSE splits the light coming from every point within the area being observed into a rainbow or spectrum, which provides astronomers with a wealth of information about the objects within the field of view. The results of these observations, presented in a new paper led by Aleksandar Cikota at the Gemini Observatory in Chile, show that the distant galaxy is forming stars at a rapid rate. Since light left the galaxy when the Universe was about 20% of its current age, studying it provides clues about how galaxies formed in the early Universe.

DESI-253.2534+26.8843: A New Einstein Cross Spectroscopically Confirmed
with Very Large Telescope/MUSE and Modeled with GIGA-Lens
~ Aleksandar Cikota et al
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ESA: Measure of a Great Galactic Disc (NGC 3156)

Post by bystander » Wed Sep 13, 2023 7:19 pm

Measure of a Great Galactic Disc
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2023 Sep 11
This dream-like Picture of the Week features the galaxy known as NGC 3156. It is a lenticular galaxy, meaning that it falls somewhere between an elliptical and a spiral galaxy. It lies about 73 million light-years from Earth, in the minor equatorial constellation Sextans.

Sextans is a small constellation that belongs to the Hercules family of constellations. It itself is a constellation with an astronomical theme, being named for the instrument known as the sextant. Sextants are often thought of as navigational instruments that were invented in the 18th century. However, the sextant as an astronomical tool has been around for much longer than that: Islamic scholars developed astronomical sextants many hundreds of years earlier in order to measure angles in the sky. A particularly striking example is the enormous sextant with a radius of 36 metres that was developed by Ulugh Beg of the Timurid dynasty in the fifteenth century, located in Samarkand in present-day Uzbekistan. These early sextants may have been a development of the quadrant, a measuring device proposed by Ptolemy. A sextant, as the name suggests, is shaped like one-sixth of a circle, approximately the shape of the constellation.

Sextants are no longer in use in modern astronomy, having been replaced by instruments that are capable of measuring the positions of stars and astronomical objects much more accurately and precisely. NGC 3156 has been studied in many ways other than determining its precise position — from its cohort of globular clusters, to its relatively recent star formation, to the stars that are being destroyed by the supermassive black hole at its centre.
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NOIRLab: Calibration Station (Rubin Observatory)

Post by bystander » Wed Sep 13, 2023 7:34 pm

Calibration Station
NOIRLab Image of the Week | Rubin Observatory | 2023 Sep 13
The bright band of the Milky Way seems to spill from the open dome of the Rubin Auxiliary Telescope (AuxTel) in this image from the recent NOIRLab 2022 Photo Expedition. As well as the spectacular Milky Way, replete with intricate clouds of gas and dust, an amorphous airglow is visible along both horizons.

The AuxTel will take a variety of measurements and calibrations during the operations of Vera C. Rubin Observatory, a Program of NSF’s NOIRLab. These complementary data will be used to understand atmospheric conditions and make scientific observations more accurate as Rubin Observatory conducts its decade-long sky survey. In contrast to the new Simonyi Survey Telescope of Rubin Observatory, the AuxTel was repurposed for use at the observatory, a donation from astronomer Edgar Smith.

Rubin Observatory is a joint initiative of the National Science Foundation and the US Department of Energy (DOE). Once completed, Rubin will be operated jointly by NSF’s NOIRLab and DOE's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to carry out the Legacy Survey of Space and Time.
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Thu Sep 14, 2023 10:47 pm

Soap Bubble Nebula (Ju 1)
https://www.astrobin.com/q7jbhk/
Copyright: Boris Chausov
CyuKO1-a5alF_16536x0_b9muqi8S.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Thu Sep 14, 2023 10:50 pm

Rosette Nebula (NGC 2237)
https://www.cielaustral.com/galerie/photo144.htm
Copyright: Ciel Austral
photo144.jpg
This image shows a small part of the whole nebula.
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Fri Sep 15, 2023 10:18 pm

StDr 31
http://www.astrofotografie-hess.at/stdr31.html
Data: Rochus Hess
Processing: Marcel Drechsler
stdr31.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Sun Sep 17, 2023 10:22 pm

Abell 59 and Berkeley 44
http://www.astrophoton.com/PN_Abell59.htm
Copyright: Bernhard Hubl
Abell59.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2023 September

Post by starsurfer » Sun Sep 17, 2023 10:23 pm

NGC 1365
https://noirlab.edu/public/images/iotw2127a/
Copyright: Dark Energy Survey/DOE/FNAL/DECam/CTIO/NOIRLab/NSF/AURA
Processing: Travis Rector (University of Alaska Anchorage/NSF’s NOIRLab), Jen Miller (Gemini Observatory/NSF’s NOIRLab), Mahdi Zamani & Davide de Martin (NSF’s NOIRLab)

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ESO: New Planetary-Mass Object Found in Quadruple System (HIP 81208)

Post by bystander » Tue Sep 19, 2023 3:05 pm

New Planetary-Mass Object Found in Quadruple System
ESO Picture of the Week | VLT | 2023 Sep 18
This Picture of the Week shows the unique stellar system HIP 81208, as captured by ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile. Astronomers thought HIP 81208 was a system consisting of a massive central star (A, the central bright spot), a brown dwarf (B) circling around it, and a low-mass star (C) orbiting further away. However, a new study has revealed a never-before-seen hidden gem: an object (Cb), approximately 15 times more massive than Jupiter, orbiting around the smaller of the two stars (C).

The discovery of Cb means that HIP 81208 is a uniquely intriguing system with two stars and two smaller bodies orbiting each one –– in other words, a hierarchical quadruple system. The mass of the newly found Cb object places it right at the border between planets and brown dwarfs –– failed stars that are not massive and hot enough to fuse hydrogen into helium.

The hidden giant Cb was spotted when a team of astronomers, led by A. Chomez of the Paris Observatory, re-analysed archival data from the Spectro-Polarimetric High-contrast Exoplanet REsearch (SPHERE) instrument installed on the VLT. While many other instruments use indirect methods to hunt for far-flung worlds, SPHERE uses a technique known as direct imaging: what we see here is an actual image of the system. Indeed, this is the first hierarchical quadruple system to be found using direct imaging, which will prove invaluable to understanding how complex systems like this one form and evolve.

An Imaged 15 MJup Companion within a Hierarchical Quadruple System ~ A. Chomez et al
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