Found Images: 2023 October

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Found Images: 2023 October

Post by bystander » Mon Oct 02, 2023 1:53 pm


Have you seen a great image or video somewhere that you think would make a great APOD? Nominate it for APOD! Please post as much information here as you have about the image/video with a link to any source(s) for it you know of here, and the editors will take a look.

When posting the image itself, please do not post anything larger than a thumbnail here; please honor the copyright holder's copyright.

Please keep hotlinked images under 500K.

Thank you!

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ESA: Glowing Rosy in the Dark (IC 1284)

Post by bystander » Mon Oct 02, 2023 3:31 pm

Glowing Rosy in the Dark
ESO Picture of the Week | VST | 2023 Oct 02
There are two different types of nebulae brought to you in this Picture of the Week. Each appears with a distinct colour in the visible sky and are captured here using the wide-field camera OmegaCAM on the VLT Survey Telescope (VST), hosted at ESO’s Paranal Observatory in the Chilean desert.

The large, bright emission nebula at the centre, IC1284, is a star-forming region composed primarily of hydrogen. Its rosy glow comes from electrons within the hydrogen atoms: they’re excited by the radiation from young stars, but then they lose energy and emit a specific colour or wavelength of light. One of the filters on OmegaCAM lets through this particular reddish colour, hence the nebula’s look. Meanwhile, another colour filter highlights the blue reflection nebulae NGC6589 and NGC6590 in the lower right corner. The dust in a reflection nebula preferentially scatters shorter, bluer wavelengths of light from nearby stars, which is what gives these nebulae their eerie glow. It’s the same reason why the sky is blue!

The frame of this image covers an area roughly equivalent in the sky to a full Moon. This image was captured as part of a large ESO public survey, the VST Photometric H alpha Survey of the Southern Galactic Plane and Bulge (VPHAS+), which observes nebulae and stars in visible light to help astronomers understand how stars are born, live and die.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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ESA: Leaving on a Jet

Post by bystander » Mon Oct 02, 2023 3:39 pm

Leaving on a Jet
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2023 Oct 02
This spectacular image shows a region called G35.2-0.7N, which is known as a hotbed of high-mass star formation. The kind of stars that form here are so massive that they will end their lives as destructive supernovae. However, even as they form they greatly impact their surroundings. At least one B-type star — the second most massive type — lurks within the region pictured here, and a powerful protostellar jet that it is launching towards us is the source of the spectacular light show. The image was taken with the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3), which is mounted on the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, and the region G35.2-0.7N lies around 7200 light-years from Earth in the constellation Aquila.

This beautiful picture was assembled using data that were collected primarily for very specific research purposes, as are many of the Hubble Pictures of the Week. The research conducted using these data included measuring the extent of ionisation in the jets being blasted out of the protostar buried within G35.2-0.7N. Ionisation is a process by which atoms or molecules become charged, often because they are in such a high-energy environment that they have lost some of their electrons (the tiny negatively charged particles that orbit nuclei in atoms and molecules). Protostellar jets are enormous collimated beams of matter that are ejected from protostars. Collimated simply means that the matter is ejected in parallel (column-like) streams, which in turn means that the jets do not spread out much, but extend out very far in relatively straight lines.

The visual result of the ejected matter is the glorious display visible in this image. Much of the nebula is dark, with light being blocked from Hubble’s view by the rich dust clouds that produce these massive stars. Near the very centre can be seen the location of the star and the jet of material it is emitting. The small, bright orange streak there is a cavity in the dust carved out by the ferocity of the jet as it streams towards us. By breaking through its dusty cocoon, the jet reveals light from the protostar, but there is still so much dust that the light is “reddened” to a fiery orange. The massive protostar lies at the very lower-left tip of this cavity.
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Re: Found Images: 2023 October

Post by starsurfer » Mon Oct 02, 2023 10:48 pm

HFG 1 and Abell 6
http://www.capella-observatory.com/Imag ... Abell6.htm
Copyright: Josef Pöpsel, Stefan Binnewies and Frank Sackenheim
HFG1Abell6.jpg
HFG 1 is the planetary nebula at top and Abell 6 is the smaller planetary nebula at the bottom.
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Re: Found Images: 2023 October

Post by starsurfer » Mon Oct 02, 2023 10:50 pm

FP J1912-0331
https://www.imagingdeepspace.com/fp-j1912-0331.html
Data: Sven Eklund
Processing: Peter Goodhew
Fe05Td1bqPbD_16536x0_Rr9Vgg-0.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2023 October

Post by starsurfer » Mon Oct 02, 2023 10:54 pm

StDr 44
https://www.starscapeimaging.com/StDr44/StDr44.html
Data: Jon Talbot
Processing: Marcel Drechsler
StDr44.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2023 October

Post by starsurfer » Mon Oct 02, 2023 10:59 pm

HB 21 region
https://www.astrobin.com/i0atrg/
Copyright: Bray Fall
Acknowledgements: Marcel Drechsler, Xavier Strottner, Peter Goodhew and Sven Eklund
RSIX0x3eS8Cm_16536x0_nJSgeYk.jpg
HB 21 is also catalogued as G89.0+4.7 and has a size of 2x1.5 degrees. Fal 2 is a likely ionized ISM nebula to the left of it.
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Re: Found Images: 2023 October

Post by starsurfer » Mon Oct 02, 2023 11:06 pm

MWP 1 and Alv 1
https://www.astrobin.com/l1by13/B/
Copyright: Herbert West
Q4P6y03VMCbg_16536x0_ieTZ0INm.jpg
Alv 1 was serendipitously discovered by the amateur astronomer Filipe Alves in 2009 whilst taking an image of MWP 1. Unfortunately, his website is no longer online. A lot of new planetary nebulae have been discovered by amateur astrophotographers whilst imaging a more well known deep sky object, with the Soap Bubble Nebula probably being the best example.
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Re: Found Images: 2023 October

Post by starsurfer » Mon Oct 02, 2023 11:10 pm

Bernes 6
https://www.astrobin.com/54pjmd/
Copyright: Wolfgang Promper
2Pg0c9QZaZj9_16536x0_ieTZ0INm.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2023 October

Post by starsurfer » Sat Oct 07, 2023 9:57 pm

Bubble Nebula (NGC 7635) region
http://www.astrosurf.com/ilizaso/orriak ... Q_U16m.htm
Copyright: Iñaki Lizaso
BubbleNebula.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2023 October

Post by starsurfer » Sat Oct 07, 2023 10:00 pm

NGC 3583
https://esahubble.org/images/potw2018a/
Copyright: ESA/Hubble & NASA, A. Riess et al

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Re: Found Images: 2023 October

Post by starsurfer » Mon Oct 09, 2023 10:38 pm

WR 128 nebula and Sh2-84
https://www.astrobin.com/rk2h62/
Copyright: Walter Leonhard Schramböck
TGasVpkBgSY7_16536x0_ieTZ0INm.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2023 October

Post by starsurfer » Mon Oct 09, 2023 10:42 pm

Ear Nebula and IC 5076
http://outters.fr/wp/?p=9891
Copyright: Nicolas Outters
ear_nebula.jpg
This area is north of the North America Nebula.
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Re: Found Images: 2023 October

Post by starsurfer » Mon Oct 09, 2023 10:46 pm

B150
https://www.astrobin.com/5sczua/
Copyright: Aleix Roig
ZMTT8w7leu3k_16536x0_44DdFZM3.jpg
The amateur discovery Hu 1 can be seen near the top left corner, which was discovered by the amateur astronomer Laurent Huet.
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ESO: An ExTrA Special Planet Hunter

Post by bystander » Tue Oct 10, 2023 12:08 am

An ExTrA Special Planet Hunter
ESO Picture of the Week | La Silla | 2023 Oct 09
The white pearl on the left side of this Picture of the Week is one of the Exoplanets in Transits and their Atmospheres telescopes — ExTrA for short. Located at ESO’s La Silla Observatory at an altitude of 2375m, ExTrA is a French national project comprising three 60 centimetre telescopes that are working towards one goal: to detect Earth-sized planets in our home galaxy, the Milky Way.

ExTrA focuses on planets around very small stars, with a radius down to a tenth of the Sun. It relies on the so-called transit method, looking for slight dips in the light emitted from a star when a planet passes in front of it, like a tiny eclipse. The smaller the star is, the larger the dip an Earth-sized planet will cause. Each telescope observes a target star and four reference ones to calibrate the effects of Earth’s atmosphere. The telescopes can observe either the same patch of the sky or different ones; the light they collect is sent to a single infrared spectrograph that breaks it up into different colours or wavelengths, thus combining the classic transit method with spectral information.

Not only do ExTra telescopes make great exoplanet hunters, they also make pretty good picture frames. Just kidding, but can you see the telescope peaking through the frame of the door of the dome? It’s the ESO 3.6-metre telescope. Also, ExTrA are not the only triplets at La Silla: in this image we can also see the three BlackGEM telescopes.
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ESA: LINER on Collision Course

Post by bystander » Tue Oct 10, 2023 12:19 am

LINER on Collision Course
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2023 Oct 09
This Picture of the Week prominently features two galaxies: NGC 3558 in the lower left, and LEDA 83465 in the upper right. Both galaxies lie roughly 450 million light years from Earth. The two galaxies are separated from one another by a distance of roughly 150 000 light years, which might sound vast, until we consider that our nearest galactic neighbour — the Andromeda galaxy — is a whopping 2.5 million light years distant from the Milky Way galaxy. In galactic terms, the two galaxies pictured here are practically on top of one another.

This is because they belong to a crowded and chaotic galaxy cluster known as Abell 1185, which is packed with galaxies that are interacting with one another via gravity. These galactic interactions have sometimes led to dramatic results, such as galaxies being torn apart completely. This fate has not befallen NGC 3558, which currently retains its integrity as both an elliptical galaxy and a low-ionisation nuclear emission-line region, or LINER. In fact, it probably attained its present form by devouring smaller galaxies in the cluster — galaxies much like LEDA 83465.

LINERs are a particular type of galactic nucleus or core, and are distinguished by the chemical fingerprints written into the light that they emit. As their name suggests, LINERs emit light which suggests that many of the atoms and molecules within these galactic cores have either been weakly ionised or not ionised at all. Ionisation is the process by which atoms or molecules lose or gain electrons. In galaxies, it is driven by a variety of processes — from shockwaves travelling through galaxies, to radiation from massive stars or from hot gas in accretion discs. In the case of LINERs, this means that many of the atoms and molecules within the galaxies have lost either a single electron, or have retained all their electrons. The mechanism that drives this weak ionisation in LINERs such as NGC 3558 is still debated amongst astronomers.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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— Garrison Keillor

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Re: Found Images: 2023 October

Post by starsurfer » Thu Oct 12, 2023 10:41 pm

IC 4628
https://www.cielaustral.com/galerie/photo155.htm
Copyright: Ciel Austral
photo155fb.jpg
photo155.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2023 October

Post by starsurfer » Thu Oct 12, 2023 10:46 pm

Ear Nebula (IPHASX J205013.7+465518)
https://www.astrobin.com/mtp1j8/
Copyright: Boris Chausov
uf1Mz2uyxj3L_16536x0_b9muqi8S.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2023 October

Post by starsurfer » Sun Oct 15, 2023 10:09 pm

NGC 6188 and NGC 6193
http://www.atacama-photographic-observa ... php?id=231
Copyright: Thierry Demange, Richard Galli and Thomas Petit
ngc6188.jpg
NGC 6188 refers to the emission nebula while NGC 6193 is the open cluster left of centre. A small part of the outer halo around NGC 6164-5 can be seen at the top right corner.
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Re: Found Images: 2023 October

Post by starsurfer » Sun Oct 15, 2023 10:13 pm

Gum 15
https://www.chart32.de/index.php/component/k2/item/370
Copyright: CHART32
Processing: Bernd Flach-Wilken
Gum15.jpg
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NOIRLab: Rainbow on Maunakea (Gemini)

Post by bystander » Mon Oct 16, 2023 5:02 pm

Rainbow on Maunakea
NOIRLab Image of the Week | Gemini | 2023 Oct 11
From the vantage point of Gemini North, one half of the International Gemini Observatory, operated by NSF’s NOIRLab, a small rainbow can be seen sprouting from behind smaller peaks near the summit of Maunakea. One of the five volcanoes constituting the Big Island of Hawai‘i, Maunakea rises to an elevation of 4205 meters (13,786 feet). At that elevation, tropical clouds infrequently cover the summit, but they often roll past at lower altitude, as seen here, bringing some moisture to the dry area. These water droplets suspended in the air would typically be invisible, but their presence is betrayed when light is refracted through them. The droplets become like prisms, slowing and then separating the almost white sunlight into its component colors. The result is a spectacular spectrum of light — a rainbow — that is beautifully complimented by the red soil of the volcano and deep blue of the sky.
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ESA: Perched on Top of the World (NTT)

Post by bystander » Mon Oct 16, 2023 5:14 pm

Perched on Top of the World
ESA Picture of the Week | La Silla | 2023 Oct 16
Standing majestically at the top of a hill at ESO’s La Silla Observatory, surveying the watercolour scenery of another sunset in Chile’s Atacama Desert, is the New Technology Telescope (NTT). The star of this Picture of the Week has been ticking along, making discovery after discovery, ever since it was inaugurated in 1989. Its home at La Silla sits at an altitude of 2400 metres and is far from sources of light pollution, giving the NTT uninterrupted views of the Universe.

This plucky telescope has a 3.58-metre primary mirror, which it uses to observe the cosmos in optical and near-infrared wavelengths of light. Currently, the NTT is equipped with two instruments: the Son of ISAAC (SOFI) and the ESO Faint Object Spectrograph and Camera 2 (EFOSC2). The former received its unusual name because of its similarity to an instrument on ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT, located further north) that went by the name ISAAC. Instruments like SOFI that observe infrared light can pierce through cosmic dust better than facilities observing at other wavelengths, peeling back a veil shrouding the Universe.

As for EFOSC2, it has had a rather nomadic life: it started operating at the NTT in 1989 and then it was relocated twice to other telescopes at La Silla before returning to the NTT in 2008. Having undergone several improvements over the years, it remains a highly versatile instrument at La Silla.
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
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ESA: ‘S’ is for ‘Spiral’, ‘AB’ is for … ‘Weakly Barred’ (IC 5332)

Post by bystander » Mon Oct 16, 2023 5:32 pm

‘S’ is for ‘Spiral’, ‘AB’ is for … ‘Weakly Barred’
ESA Hubble Picture of the Week | 2023 Oct 16
This glittering image shows the spiral galaxy IC 5332, which lies about 30 million light-years away in the constellation Sculptor, and has an almost face-on orientation to Earth. To explain what is meant by ‘face-on’, it is helpful to visualise a spiral galaxy as an (extremely) large disc. If the galaxy is oriented so that it appears circular and disc-shaped from our perspective here on Earth, then we can say that it is ‘face-on’. In contrast, if it is oriented so that it appears squashed and oval-shaped, then we would say that it is ‘edge-on’. The key thing is that the same galaxy would look extremely different from our perspective depending on whether it was face-on or edge-on as seen from Earth. Check out these previous Hubble Pictures of the Week for examples of another face-on spiral galaxy and an almost edge-on spiral galaxy.

IC 5332 is designated as an SABc-type galaxy in the De Vaucouleurs system of galaxy classification. The ‘S’ is straightforward, identifying it as a spiral galaxy, which it clearly is, given the well-defined arms of bright stars and darker dust that curl outwards from the galaxy’s dense and bright core. The ‘AB’ is a little more complex. It means that the galaxy is weakly barred, which refers to the shape of the galaxy’s centre. The majority of spiral galaxies do not spiral out from a single point, but rather from an elongated bar-type structure. SAB galaxies — which are also known as intermediate spiral galaxies — do not have a clear bar-shape at their core, but also do not spiral out from a single point, instead falling somewhere in between. The lowercase ‘c’ describes how tightly wound the spiral arms are: ‘a’ would indicate very tightly wound, and ‘d’ very loosely wound. Thus, IC 5332 is quite an intermediate spiral galaxy on many fronts: weakly barred, with quite loosely wound arms, and almost completely face-on!
Know the quiet place within your heart and touch the rainbow of possibility; be
alive to the gentle breeze of communication, and please stop being such a jerk.
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Re: Found Images: 2023 October

Post by starsurfer » Fri Oct 20, 2023 10:27 pm

HDW 3
https://www.astrobin.com/p70bsv/
Copyright: Maciej Kapkowski
SbDquYA7ecMu_16536x16536_kWXURFLk.jpg
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Re: Found Images: 2023 October

Post by starsurfer » Fri Oct 20, 2023 10:29 pm

Iris Nebula (NGC 7023)
https://www.astrobin.com/v9gvr6/
Copyright: Peter Csordas
jNGiHplwkZ0U_16536x16536_zMxJEC0X.jpg
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