APOD: Barnard Stares at NGC 2170 (2013 Jan 19)

Comments and questions about the APOD on the main view screen.
User avatar
APOD Robot
Otto Posterman
Posts: 5455
Joined: Fri Dec 04, 2009 3:27 am

APOD: Barnard Stares at NGC 2170 (2013 Jan 19)

Post by APOD Robot » Sat Jan 19, 2013 5:10 am

Image Barnard Stares at NGC 2170

Explanation: A gaze across a cosmic skyscape, this telescopic mosaic reveals the continuous beauty of things that are. The evocative scene spans some 6 degrees or 12 Full Moons in planet Earth's sky. At the left, folds of red, glowing gas are a small part of an immense, 300 light-year wide arc. Known as Barnard's loop, the structure is too faint to be seen with the eye, shaped by long gone supernova explosions and the winds from massive stars, and still traced by the light of hydrogen atoms. Barnard's loop lies about 1,500 light-years away roughly centered on the Great Orion Nebula, a stellar nursery along the edge of Orion's molecular clouds. But beyond lie other fertile star fields in the plane of our Milky Way Galaxy. At the right, the long-exposure composite finds NGC 2170, a dusty complex of nebulae near a neighboring molecular cloud some 2,400 light-years distant.

<< Previous APOD This Day in APOD Next APOD >>
[/b]

User avatar
Beyond
500 Gigaderps
Posts: 6889
Joined: Tue Aug 04, 2009 11:09 am
Location: BEYONDER LAND

Re: APOD: Barnard Stares at NGC 2170 (2013 Jan 19)

Post by Beyond » Sat Jan 19, 2013 5:18 am

Is there a name for the round red bubble in the lower right?
To find the Truth, you must go Beyond.

Selador

Re: APOD: Barnard Stares at NGC 2170 (2013 Jan 19)

Post by Selador » Sat Jan 19, 2013 5:39 am

Beyond wrote:Is there a name for the round red bubble in the lower right?
I was wondering the same thing. Seems almost a perfect globe.

User avatar
Ann
4725 Å
Posts: 13600
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 5:33 am

Re: APOD: Barnard Stares at NGC 2170 (2013 Jan 19)

Post by Ann » Sat Jan 19, 2013 6:09 am

Beyond wrote:Is there a name for the round red bubble in the lower right?
I think you mean the red bubble called van den Bergh 70. In this picture, you can see van den Bergh 70 at upper left.

Sidney van den Bergh cataloged
all BD and CD stars north of -33 deg which are surrounded by reflection nebulosity visible on both the blue and red prints of the Palomar Sky Survey.
The van den Bergh catalog contains 159 reflection nebulae.

Reflection nebulae, unlike emission nebula, reflect the light of a star rather than emit their own light. Reflection nebulae are typically blue, but a very few may be another color entirely: the most famous one is the dusty yellow reflection nebula around Antares.

Reflection nebulae are typically found around young stars, often stars of spectral classes B and A. Sidney van den Bergh has cataloged several reflection nebulae in the NGC 2170 complex itself. There are several stars of spectral class B in and near NGC 2170.

The star inside van den Bergh 70 is of spectral class B1, according to my software. A star of that spectral class is just hot enough to ionize a (relatively faint) red emission nebula. Dust in the vicinity of the star reflects the blue light of the star.

Let me say, finally, that today's APOD is glorious! That part of Barnard's Loop really does look like some kind of lumbering red space giant with a huge red nose and a small blue eye, contemplating those baby nebulae and baby stars that he has just discovered! :D (Will he eat them?) :shock:

Ann
Color Commentator

User avatar
Raven
Ensign
Posts: 22
Joined: Thu Jan 17, 2013 12:15 am
Location: Franklin, WI, USA

Re: APOD: Barnard Stares at NGC 2170 (2013 Jan 19)

Post by Raven » Sat Jan 19, 2013 7:35 am

The title "Barnard Stares...." hints at something about Barnard's Star, not Barnard's loop.

What about "Barnard Looks....", "Barnard Leers....", "Barnard Glares....", or something else alliterating with "loop" or at least not with "star"?

Boomer12k
:---[===] *
Posts: 2691
Joined: Sun Apr 22, 2007 12:07 am

Re: APOD: Barnard Stares at NGC 2170 (2013 Jan 19)

Post by Boomer12k » Sat Jan 19, 2013 1:35 pm

I would be great to see the whole night sky like this. It shows that there are wonders upon wonders, and that is right in our own neighborhood.
Looking at each section close up is awesome enough, but to see the area all together is just breath taking. :D

Great Work!

:---[===] *

User avatar
Ann
4725 Å
Posts: 13600
Joined: Sat May 29, 2010 5:33 am

Re: APOD: Barnard Stares at NGC 2170 (2013 Jan 19)

Post by Ann » Sat Jan 19, 2013 2:24 pm

Raven wrote:The title "Barnard Stares...." hints at something about Barnard's Star, not Barnard's loop.

What about "Barnard Looks....", "Barnard Leers....", "Barnard Glares....", or something else alliterating with "loop" or at least not with "star"?
Tenth magnitude (V=9.54) red dwarf Barnard's Star in constellation Ophiuchus stares at open cluster IC 4665 and red giant star Beta Ophiuchi.

Supergiant star Betelgeuse in Orion is located almost opposite supergiant star Antares in constellation Scorpius. Ophiuchus is a constellation that borders Scorpius. So Barnard's Loop and Barnard's Star are in fact located pretty much opposite one another in the sky. You may confuse them.

Or not.

Ann
Color Commentator

User avatar
owlice
Guardian of the Codes
Posts: 8406
Joined: Wed Aug 04, 2004 4:18 pm
Location: Washington, DC

Re: APOD: Barnard Stares at NGC 2170 (2013 Jan 19)

Post by owlice » Sat Jan 19, 2013 3:25 pm

Raven wrote:The title "Barnard Stares...." hints at something about Barnard's Star, not Barnard's loop.
Not to me, it doesn't.

I like everything about this APOD, image, text, and links; it connects nicely with one of last week's images in addition to other APODs and the Adams quote is evocative, poetic, and fitting.
A closed mouth gathers no foot.

User avatar
neufer
Vacationer at Tralfamadore
Posts: 18805
Joined: Mon Jan 21, 2008 1:57 pm
Location: Alexandria, Virginia

Re: APOD: Barnard Stares at NGC 2170 (2013 Jan 19)

Post by neufer » Sat Jan 19, 2013 3:53 pm

owlice wrote:
Raven wrote:
The title "Barnard Stares...." hints at something about Barnard's Star, not Barnard's loop.
Not to me, it doesn't.
"Barnard Stares...." also hints at the Barn Owl Stare: :owl:

I'm assuming that the APOD title was simply an inside joke
directed specifically at folks like "Raven."

Only this and nothing more.
Art Neuendorffer

User avatar
stephen63
Science Officer
Posts: 304
Joined: Sat Jan 12, 2013 2:53 am
Location: Pa

Re: APOD: Barnard Stares at NGC 2170 (2013 Jan 19)

Post by stephen63 » Sat Jan 19, 2013 5:00 pm

Boomer12k wrote:I would be great to see the whole night sky like this. It shows that there are wonders upon wonders, and that is right in our own neighborhood.
Looking at each section close up is awesome enough, but to see the area all together is just breath taking. :D

Great Work!
This fellow was thinking the same thing! 37,440 exposures later....... Maybe not the whole sky, but at least he captured the Milky Way!
http://skysurvey.org/survey/

User avatar
stephen63
Science Officer
Posts: 304
Joined: Sat Jan 12, 2013 2:53 am
Location: Pa

Re: APOD: Barnard Stares at NGC 2170 (2013 Jan 19)

Post by stephen63 » Sat Jan 19, 2013 5:09 pm

Actually, it looks like he captured the entire night sky.

User avatar
Beyond
500 Gigaderps
Posts: 6889
Joined: Tue Aug 04, 2009 11:09 am
Location: BEYONDER LAND

Re: APOD: Barnard Stares at NGC 2170 (2013 Jan 19)

Post by Beyond » Sat Jan 19, 2013 5:48 pm

Ann wrote:
Beyond wrote:Is there a name for the round red bubble in the lower right?
I think you mean the red bubble called van den Bergh 70. In this picture, you can see van den Bergh 70 at upper left.

Sidney van den Bergh cataloged.
That would seem to be it. Although it looks more fuller/better in todays APOD.
Thanks, Ann.
To find the Truth, you must go Beyond.

Robin

Re: APOD: Barnard Stares at NGC 2170 (2013 Jan 19)

Post by Robin » Sat Jan 19, 2013 6:39 pm

That bubble is miles away from the Van den Bergh 70 in the "picture". And it's got very sharp and round edges.

starsurfer
Stellar Cartographer
Posts: 5405
Joined: Thu Mar 15, 2012 7:25 pm

Re: APOD: Barnard Stares at NGC 2170 (2013 Jan 19)

Post by starsurfer » Sun Jan 20, 2013 12:00 am

Ann wrote:
Beyond wrote:Is there a name for the round red bubble in the lower right?
I think you mean the red bubble called van den Bergh 70. In this picture, you can see van den Bergh 70 at upper left.

Sidney van den Bergh cataloged
all BD and CD stars north of -33 deg which are surrounded by reflection nebulosity visible on both the blue and red prints of the Palomar Sky Survey.
The van den Bergh catalog contains 159 reflection nebulae.

Reflection nebulae, unlike emission nebula, reflect the light of a star rather than emit their own light. Reflection nebulae are typically blue, but a very few may be another color entirely: the most famous one is the dusty yellow reflection nebula around Antares.

Reflection nebulae are typically found around young stars, often stars of spectral classes B and A. Sidney van den Bergh has cataloged several reflection nebulae in the NGC 2170 complex itself. There are several stars of spectral class B in and near NGC 2170.

The star inside van den Bergh 70 is of spectral class B1, according to my software. A star of that spectral class is just hot enough to ionize a (relatively faint) red emission nebula. Dust in the vicinity of the star reflects the blue light of the star.

Let me say, finally, that today's APOD is glorious! That part of Barnard's Loop really does look like some kind of lumbering red space giant with a huge red nose and a small blue eye, contemplating those baby nebulae and baby stars that he has just discovered! :D (Will he eat them?) :shock:

Ann
vdB70 also has lots of Ha emission nebulosity along with the reflection nebula. A closeup by Adam Block would be amazing!!! :D

Guest

Re: APOD: Barnard Stares at NGC 2170 (2013 Jan 19)

Post by Guest » Sat Jan 26, 2013 12:19 pm

What a beautiful image: I like these views of the night sky!

Awoodriff
Asternaut
Posts: 2
Joined: Wed Feb 06, 2013 9:55 am

Re: APOD: Barnard Stares at NGC 2170 (2013 Jan 19)

Post by Awoodriff » Fri Feb 08, 2013 9:34 am

Seems like I'm not the only one amazed with van den Bergh 70. :) Got me thinking what it was.