Planck Universe: 13.81 billion years old

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neufer
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Planck Universe: 13.81 billion years old

Post by neufer » Thu Mar 21, 2013 2:20 pm

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/21/universe-age-planck-space-probe-date-big-bang_n_2922818.html wrote:
Universe's Age? Planck Space Probe Data Push Back
Date Of Big Bang That Started It All
By LORI HINNANT & SETH BORENSTEIN, huffingtonpost, 03/21/13

<<PARIS -- New results from a look into the split second after the Big Bang indicate the universe is 80 million years older than previously thought but the core concepts of the cosmos – how it began, what it's made of and where it's going – seem to be on the right track. The findings released Thursday bolster a key theory called inflation, which says the universe burst from subatomic size to its now-observable expanse in a fraction of a second.

The Big Bang is the most comprehensive theory of the universe's beginning. It says the visible portion of the universe was smaller than an atom when, in a split second, it exploded, cooled and expanded rapidly, much faster than the speed of light.

The European Space Agency's Planck space probe looked back at the afterglow of the Big Bang, and those results have now added about 80 million years to the universe's age, putting it 13.81 billion years old.

The probe also found that the cosmos is expanding a bit slower than originally thought, has a little less of that mysterious dark energy than astronomers figured and a tad more normal matter. But scientists say those are small changes in calculations about the cosmos, nothing dramatic when dealing with numbers so massive.

"We've uncovered a fundamental truth of the universe," said George Efstathiou, director of the Kavli Institute for Cosmology at the University of Cambridge who announced the Planck satellite mapping. "There's less stuff that we don't understand by a tiny amount."

The $900 million Planck space telescope was launched in 2009. It has spent 15 1/2 months mapping the sky, examining light fossils and sound echoes from the Big Bang by looking at the background radiation in the cosmos. The device is expected to keep transmitting data until late 2013, when it runs out of cooling fluid. Officials at NASA, which also was part of the experiment, said this provided a deeper understanding of the intricate history of the universe and its complex composition.

Outside scientists said the result confirms on a universal scale what the announcement earlier this month by a different European group confirmed on a subatomic scale – that they had found the Higgs boson particle which explains mass in the universe. "What a wonderful triumph of the mathematical approach to describing nature," said Brian Greene, a Columbia University physicist who was not part of the new research. "It's an amazing story of discovery.">>
Art Neuendorffer

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A spectacular new map of the "oldest light" in the sky

Post by Psnarf » Thu Mar 21, 2013 2:49 pm

Planck satellite: Maps detail Universe's ancient light
BBC News | Science & Environment | 2013 Mar 21

13.8 billion years ago, something may have occurred. Meanwhile, it's back to the drawing board. Ratio of matter to dark energy has to be revised, matter (31.7%) :: "dark energy" (68.3%). And what's the deal with that cold spot?
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Re: 13.81 billion years old

Post by Beyond » Thu Mar 21, 2013 2:58 pm

It's all BTFSPLK's fault. His name is unpronounceable :!: All we can understand is a small part...JOE.
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Re: A spectacular new map of the "oldest light" in the sky

Post by MargaritaMc » Thu Mar 21, 2013 3:45 pm

Planck Reveals an Almost Perfect Universe
ESA Space Science | Planck | 2013 Mar 21

Berkeley Lab scientists read the cosmic writing on the wall
DOE/Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | via EurekAlert | 2013 Mar 21
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
&mdash; Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: 13.81 billion years old

Post by Ann » Thu Mar 21, 2013 4:32 pm

Hugely interesting, Margarita!

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Re: Planck Universe: 13.81 billion years old

Post by bystander » Thu Mar 21, 2013 5:39 pm

Planck reveals an almost perfect Universe
Max Planck Gesellschaft | 2013 Mar 21

Planck challenges our understanding of the Universe
UK Space Agency | 2013 Mar 21

Planck Mission Brings Universe Into Sharp Focus
NASA | JPL-Caltech | 2013 Mar 21

Universe Older Than Thought, New Map Reveals
Space.com | via Discovery News | 2013 Mar 21

Universe Older Than Previously Thought
NASA Science News | 2013 Mar 21

Planck Mission Brings Universe Into Sharp Focus
University of California, Santa Barbara | 2013 Mar 21

Planck's new map brings universe into focus
University of California, Davis | via EurekAlert | 2013 Mar 21
Planck's 'Child' Universe
International School of Advanced Studies (SISSA) | 2013 Mar 21

Planck Mission Updates the Age of the Universe and What it Contains
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | 2013 Mar 21

Best Image of Big Bang Afterglow Ever Confirms Standard Cosmology
Science NOW | Adrian Cho | 2013 Mar 21

Astrophysicists Helped Planck Bring Universe into Sharp Focus
Princeton University | 2013 Mar 21

Planck shows almost perfect cosmos – plus axis of evil
New Scientist | Jacob Aron | 2013 Mar 21

The Universe Is 13.82 Billion Years Old
Slate Blogs | Bad Astronomy | 2013 Mar 21

Planck’s Cosmic Map Reveals Universe Older, Expanding More Slowly
Universe Today | John Williams | 2013 Mar 21

Supercomputer Helps Planck Mission Expose Ancient Light
NASA | JPL-Caltech | 2013 Mar 21

Building the Massive Simulation Sets Essential to Planck Results
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory | 2013 Mar 14
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Re: Planck Universe: 13.81 billion years old

Post by MargaritaMc » Thu Mar 21, 2013 7:49 pm

http://www.ras.org.uk/news-and-press/21 ... is-of-evil
The New Scientist link in bystander's post mentions 'axis of evil'. The Royal Astronomical Society has the above article. The New Scientist information is behind a subscription wall after the initial link.

M

PS. Later edit, answering my own query!
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
&mdash; Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: Planck Universe: 13.81 billion years old

Post by bystander » Thu Mar 21, 2013 8:00 pm

MargaritaMc wrote:http://www.ras.org.uk/news-and-press/21 ... is-of-evil
The New Scientist link in bystander's post mentions 'axis of evil'. The Royal Astronomical Society has the above article. The New Scientist information is behind a subscription wall after the initial link.

M

PS. Later edit, answering my own query!
http://asterisk.apod.com/viewtopic.php?f=31&t=24503
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Re: Planck Universe: 13.81 billion years old

Post by Beyond » Thu Mar 21, 2013 8:06 pm

margaritaMc wrote:PS. Later edit, answering my own query!
Answering your own query :?: :?: You've only got two posts in this thread. Where the heck did you hide your query that you answered :?: :?:
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MargaritaMc
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Re: Planck Universe: 13.81 billion years old

Post by MargaritaMc » Thu Mar 21, 2013 8:09 pm

bystander wrote:
MargaritaMc wrote:http://www.ras.org.uk/news-and-press/21 ... f-evil----

PS. Later edit, answering my own query!
http://asterisk.apod.com/viewtopic.php?f=31&t=24503

What a STAR you are!!
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
&mdash; Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: Planck Universe: 13.81 billion years old

Post by MargaritaMc » Thu Mar 21, 2013 8:16 pm

Beyond wrote:
margaritaMc wrote:PS. Later edit, answering my own query!
Answering your own query :?: :?: You've only got two posts in this thread. Where the heck did you hide your query that you answered :?: :?:
SORRY! I should have left what I'd asked - it was just asking what 'axis of evil' implied in this context, as Google, Wikipedia and my memory could only supply George Bush's use of the term (and a comedy group). I didn't stop to think that my PS was nonsensical once I'd found out what it implied by doing a more specific search. Put it down to what is euphemistically known as a 'Senior Moment'... :wink:
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
&mdash; Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: Planck Universe: 13.81 billion years old

Post by Beyond » Thu Mar 21, 2013 8:58 pm

MargaritaMc wrote:
Beyond wrote:
margaritaMc wrote:PS. Later edit, answering my own query!
Answering your own query :?: :?: You've only got two posts in this thread. Where the heck did you hide your query that you answered :?: :?:
SORRY! I should have left what I'd asked - it was just asking what 'axis of evil' implied in this context, as Google, Wikipedia and my memory could only supply George Bush's use of the term (and a comedy group). I didn't stop to think that my PS was nonsensical once I'd found out what it implied by doing a more specific search. Put it down to what is euphemistically known as a 'Senior Moment'... :wink:
Oh... you have 'those' also :?: :mrgreen: :lol2:
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Planck 2013 Results Papers

Post by bystander » Fri Mar 22, 2013 5:10 am

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Re: Planck Universe: 13.81 billion years old

Post by ErnieM » Sat Mar 23, 2013 2:26 pm

Image
Image
Image
Watch the video simulation
Click to play embedded YouTube video.

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Re: Planck Universe: 13.81 billion years old

Post by Psnarf » Sat Mar 23, 2013 4:05 pm

Thank you for merging my post. Dr. Neufer and I were typing at the same time. I didn't know he had already started a thread.
[I couldn't get back sooner, I hosed my boot sequence.]

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Re: Planck Universe: 13.81 billion years old

Post by MargaritaMc » Sat Mar 23, 2013 4:29 pm

Psnarf wrote
I hosed my boot sequence.
Margarita says -- What does THAT mean??! :?: :shock: :D :
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
&mdash; Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: Planck Universe: 13.81 billion years old

Post by owlice » Mon Mar 25, 2013 11:11 am

MargaritaMc wrote:
Psnarf wrote
I hosed my boot sequence.
Margarita says -- What does THAT mean??! :?: :shock: :D :
His computer made (or had) a boo-boo... apparently with his help! :shock:

http://onlineslangdictionary.com/meanin ... n-of/hosed
http://www.techterms.com/definition/bootsequence
A closed mouth gathers no foot.

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Re: Planck Universe: 13.81 billion years old

Post by MargaritaMc » Mon Mar 25, 2013 11:25 am

owlice wrote: His computer made (or had) a boo-boo... apparently with his help! :shock:

http://onlineslangdictionary.com/meanin ... n-of/hosed
http://www.techterms.com/definition/bootsequence
Ah! I knew what a boot sequence was, but thought 'hose' might mean cleaning it up!
I have bookmarked the slang dictionary as I'm always being brought up short by new slang that I don't understand. Living in a Spanish-speaking environment means that I don't get introduced to it in everyday speech.
So, when an exercise at the Khan Academy tells me to "rock on" :shock: - I am a foreigner in my own language :roll:
Margarita
"In those rare moments of total quiet with a dark sky, I again feel the awe that struck me as a child. The feeling is utterly overwhelming as my mind races out across the stars. I feel peaceful and serene."
&mdash; Dr Debra M. Elmegreen, Fellow of the AAAS

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Re: Planck data

Post by bystander » Tue Apr 02, 2013 4:30 am

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SAO: A Challenge to Cosmology

Post by bystander » Sun Apr 14, 2013 9:05 pm

A Challenge to Cosmology
Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory
Weekly Science Update | 2013 Apr 12
The universe was created about fourteen billion years ago in a blaze of light known as the big bang. After about 380,000 years or so, once matter had cooled enough for neutral atoms (mostly hydrogen atoms) to form, light was able to travel through space relatively freely. We see that light today as the cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR). The light is extremely uniform across the sky, but not perfectly so: Astronomers have discovered that the radiation actually has very faint ripples and bumps in it at a level of only about one part in ten thousand. These ripples reflect the architecture of the universe when the light was freed, and are the cosmic seeds for subsequent cosmic structures, like galaxies.

The CMBR was discovered by Penzias and Wilson in 1964. Those faint ripples were first spotted by the NASA’s COBE satellite in 1991, and they have been studied in increasing detail during the past decade with NASA’s WMAP satellite (as well as with millimeter ground-based telescopes). Last month, the European Space Agency announced the first results from its Planck satellite, launched in 2009 to study the CMBR with greater precision than ever before. They reported excellent agreement with current models, and updated some of the key values, for example finding that the age of the universe is 13.82 billion years. But the precisions of WMAP and especially Planck allow astronomers to think about more than just how galaxies developed after the matter cooled. They enable consideration of what happened in the invisible era, before the matter had cooled. The pivotal event of that epoch is thought to have occurred right at the start, within less than a fraction of the first second: inflation.

According to models of inflation proposed in the 1980’s, based on concepts in elementary particle physics, the early universe underwent a dramatic and exponential growth spurt, swelling in size a trillion trillion trillion times. The power of this theory is that it explains many otherwise mysterious properties of the universe; for example, why distant regions located in opposite directions of space seem to be so very similar (and likewise, why do the CMBR ripples look everywhere so extremely similar to one another)? After all, the regions might be so far apart (both then and now) that they should have matured in completely independent ways? Inflation provides a solution by starting them all off rather close together and only then, somewhat later, pushing them quickly very far apart. The ideas of inflation have been constantly refined over the decades and numerous variations have been elaborated. The new Planck measurements seem to lend support.

Or maybe not. CfA astronomers Anna Ijjas, Paul Steinhardt, and Avi Loeb have just published a paper arguing that the new Planck results, far from lending credibility to ideas of inflation, actually undermine them. Indeed, they argue that they pose a challenge to cosmology overall. The scientists point out that the results of Planck are actually too good, because they disfavor the simplest versions of inflation and favor with high precision only a very particular version. Yet, they argue, if one accepts the most basic principles of the inflationary paradigm, this particular version is, actually a very unlikely compared to the simplest. For this and other reasons all related to the new Planck data, the whole edifice of inflation may be in trouble. There are alternative ideas that have been proposed over the years to inflation. Perhaps the new Planck results and the criticisms in this new paper will prompt some provocative new reconsideration of modern cosmology.

Inflationary paradigm in trouble after Planck2013 - Anna Ijjas, Paul J. Steinhardt, Abraham Loeb
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Re: Planck Universe: 13.81 billion years old

Post by ErnieM » Wed May 01, 2013 2:51 pm

Image
Image
The top image posted by psnarf has more pronounced colors. The solid white line added for emphasis even makes the image resemble the concept of ying and yang of Chinese philosophy.

Bystander posted the image on the left is similar to the one I posted.

The above two images, though similar, don't look the same. In my eyes, anyway. Are they from the same ESA Planck data sets?